STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Monday 6/20/02 - 1100 - 1200 Eastern Time

One Hour Feed - 5 shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

STAR GAZER

Episode # 02-27 / 1282nd Show
To Be Aired : Monday 7/1/2002 through
Sunday 7/7/2002

"Earth At Aphelion; Saturn Meets The Moon; And Venus Meets The Heart Of Leo"


Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers. This week our Earth is at aphelion and next week the ringed planet Saturn will have a super close meeting with the Moon plus Venus will have a super close meeting with Regulus. Let me show you: O.K., This Saturday, July 6th, at midnight eastern daylight time our Earth is officially at aphelion which is the astronomical word for saying that our Earth is farthest from the Sun. Ap means "away from" and helion comes from the Greek word helios which means sun. In fact, we will be 94 million, 511 thousand miles away at midnight on the 6th which is over 3 million miles farther away than when our Earth was at perihelion on January 2nd, the word 'perihelion' being the astronomical word for closest to the Sun; 'helion' once again for sun, and 'peri' which means "close to or near to." Indeed, this week and next our Sun actually appears 7% dimmer than it did in January which leads one to ask " So why is it warmer now than in January?"

And the answer is simple, it all has to do with our Earth's tilt. You see, in July our northern hemisphere is tilted more directly toward the Sun and it is the direct rays of the Sun that account for its being hotter even though we're farther away. Conversely, even though we're closest to the Sun in January our northern hemisphere is then tilted away from the Sun and receives less direct rays and thus it's colder, but only in our northern hemisphere. The reverse situation occurs in the southern hemisphere. Think about it.

And now let's take a look at early next week when a slender sliver of an old crescent Moon, complete with earthshine pays a visit to the ringed planet. Go outside on Sunday July 7 just before dawn. Look east/northeast and there you'll see as exquisite crescent Moon just above the red eye star of Taurus the Bull, Aldebaran. And below them you'll see Saturn and if you have an extremely flat horizon you may even see Mercury. But Sunday is just the set up because the big event occurs on Monday just before dawn when an even skinnier crescent is almost smack dab on top of Saturn and will provide a picture of breathtaking beauty. Don't miss this.

Then on Tuesday the 9th if you have an absolutely clear flat horizon some of you may even see one of the skinniest Moons you'll ever see parked right along side Mercury. Now for those of you who don't like to get up early, go out 1 hour after sunset Sunday the 7th, look west and you'll see brilliant Venus approaching the brightest star of Leo, Regulus. And on Monday it will be even closer. On Tuesday closer still and on Wednesday they'll be at their closest! Only 1 degree apart. Then you can watch them pull away from each other on Thursday and even farther apart on Friday when a crescent Moon will join them for yet another exquisite picture. Plus on Saturday the crescent Moon, Venus and Regulus will line up in a row. Wow! The Moon and Saturn early next week ... The Moon, Venus and Regulus at week's end. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#02-27M

7/01/2002 thru 7/07/2002

"Three Cosmic Goodies"

Horkheimer: Three interesting cosmic things are happening this week and next. This Saturday at midnight our Earth will be at its farthest from the Sun for the year, over 3 million miles farther away than when our Earth was at its closest on January 2nd. So why is it warmer now? It all has to do with our Earth's tilt. Think about it. And while you're thinking go out Monday morning July 8th just before dawn and you'll see an exquisite old crescent Moon almost smack dab on top of the ringed planet Saturn. Then on Wednesday night the 10th, look west and you'll see the brightest planet, Venus, parked right next to the brightest star of Leo, Regulus. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer







STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Monday 6/20/02 - 1100 - 1200 Eastern Time

One Hour Feed - 5 shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



 

STAR GAZER

Episode #02-28 /1283rd Show
To Be Aired : Monday 7/8/2002 through Sunday 7/14/2002

"The Two 'Mairzy Doats and Dozey Doats' and
'Supercalifragilisticexpialidocius' Stars
Of The Cosmos"

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers. Every once in a while a song comes along whose lyrics are just plain fun to pronounce. For instance, when I was a kid we all used to sing "mairzy doats and dozey doats and little lamzie divy." And then a few years later every one was singing "supercalifragilisitic expialidocius." Well, would you believe there's a cosmic version of "mairzy doats" and "supercalifragilistic expialidocius?" Let me show you: O.K.


We've got our skies set up for any night the next couple of weeks just after it gets dark out and if you look south you will see the giant fish hook shaped constellation Scorpius followed by the teapot shaped portion of Sagittarius. But up and to the right of the fish hook of Scorpius you will see 2 semi bright stars with 2 of the strangest names in the cosmos. They are Zubenelgenubi and Zubeneschamali. Now in arabic Zubenelgenubi means the southern claw and Zubeneschamali means the northern claw and over 2,000 years ago they were the claws of Scorpius.

But Julius Caesar and his egocentric buddies came along and chopped them off and renamed them Libra the Scales, for the symbol of Roman justice which would be the equivalent of congress renaming Orion "Elvis". At any rate, these 2 stars are as wonderful as their names are weird and although they look alike and appear to be the same brightness they are actually very different. Zubenelgenubi is 65 light years away from our Earth and is twice as wide as our million mile wide Sun. But it shines 25 times brighter and is racing toward us at the incredible speed of 6 miles per second.

Plus upon closer examination we find that Zubenelgenubi is not just 1, not even 2, but 3 stars, 2 of which are so close together they orbit each other once every 20 days. On the other hand, or other claw I should say, Zubeneschamali, the northern or higher claw is over twice as far away as Zubenelgenubi, 140 light years distant. So if it appears as bright to us as Zubenelgenubi, it must be larger. And indeed it is 30 times wider and 6 times brighter than Zubenelgenubi which means that it is 60 times wider and 150 times brighter than our Sun. And it is speeding toward us 4 times faster than Zubenelgenubi at a rate of 21 miles per second. Plus Zubeneschamali is the center of a centuries old debate.

You see over 2,000 years ago when it was still part of Scorpius it was listed as the brightest of all the Scorpion's stars, even brighter than Antares, Scorpius' super bright heart star. In the 2nd century A.D. however the great astronomer Ptolemy wrote that Zubeneschamali was equal to Antares in brightness. But today, 1800 years later, Antares appears to be 5 times brighter than Zubeneschamali. The mystery is: has Zubeneschamali dimmed over the past 2,000 years or has Antares gotten brighter? No one knows. At any rate, some night the next couple of weeks find these 2 wonderful tongue-twister stars for yourself. It's even easier than saying "mairzy doats" or "supercalifragilistic expialidocius." I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.



Star Gazer Minute

#02-28 M

7/08/2002 thru 7/14/2002

"It's Zubenelgenubi and
Zubeneschamali Time"

Horkheimer: It's Zubenelgenubi and Zubeneschamali time. Just after dark look south and you'll see the fish hook shaped pattern of stars, Scorpius the Scorpion and to its right the 2 brightest stars of Libra.. The star closest to the horizon is named Zubenelgenubi which means the "southern claw" and the star above it is named Zubeneschamali which means "the northern claw". And 2,000 years ago these were the official claws of the scorpion. But then Julius Caesar came along and chopped them off and renamed them Libra for the Roman scales of justice which to me would be the cosmic equivalent of congress renaming Orion "Elvis". Zubenelgenubi and Zubeneschamali, easy to find and fun to pronounce. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Monday 6/20/02 - 1100 - 1200 Eastern Time

One Hour Feed - 5 shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 02-29 / 1284th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 7/15/2002 through Sunday 7/21/2002

"A Cosmic City Of A Million Stars and
How To Find It"

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers. You know most everyone knows that our Sun is just one star in a family of 200 billion stars we call the Milky Way Galaxy. But did you know that some of the stars in our galaxy are clustered together in tight balls like cosmic cities containing hundreds, sometimes thousands and even up to a million suns? And that every summer you can see one of the very best? Let me show you:

O.K., we've got our skies set up for late July, early August, between the hours of 9 and 10 p.m., your local time, facing due north where you'll see the Little Dipper directly above your horizon. To its left you'll see the Big Dipper and if you shoot an arrow through its handle, following its curve, that arrow will land smack dab on the brightest star is summer's skies, Arcturus. Then if you look northeast you will see 3 bright stars that make up the Summer Triangle, the brightest star of which is Vega. Then if you draw a line between Vega and Arcturus you will see 2 interesting but rather dim, constellations, a half circle of stars marks the constellation Corona Borealis, the Northern Crown. To its right, toward Vega a faint sort of butterfly pattern of stars named Hercules.

But to see Hercules and Corona Borealis you'll have to make sure there's no bright moon out on the night you do your viewing. Plus if you're far from city lights you should be able to see a very dim fuzzy star in the square portion of Hercules, which astronomers call M-13 and which some early astronomers thought was either a comet or a cloud-like object called a nebula. In fact if you have a pair of binoculars and look at M-13 it will indeed look like a tiny round cloud which never ever moves in relation to the other stars. Charles Messier, for whom M-13 is named, described this cosmic cloud in 1764 as "round and brilliant with a brighter center, a nebula which I'm sure contains no star." Of course Charles Messier didn't have telescopes like we have today because even with a good amateur telescope, if you look at M-13 you will be able to count several stars in this fuzzy ball of light. And with a professional telescope you'll count thousands.

In reality however we know that M-13 is what we now call a globular cluster, a gigantic spherical city of stars all circling around a common center of gravity, a city of not hundreds, not thousands, but of at least a million stars, a cosmic city in the constellation Hercules, truly deserving of the adjective herculean. Indeed many of M-13's stars are 2,000 times as bright as our own Sun and we can't even imagine what it would be like to live on a planet circling one of these stars if indeed these stars have planets. But it would seem any planet would rarely ever experience true night because these stars are packed so closely together in a ball only 150 light years wide. And it is an ancient city we see this summer because the star light we see now left this cluster 25,000 years ago before the dawn of written history on this planet. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#02-29 M

7/15/2002 thru 7/21/2002

"Cosmic City Of A Million Stars"

Horkheimer: Every summer we can see a spherical city of a million stars. Look north for the Little Dipper, to its left the Big Dipper. Shoot an arrow through its handle to Arcturus, draw a line between it and the brightest star of the Summer Triangle, Vega. Between them you'll see Corona Borealis and a butterfly-shaped pattern of stars called Hercules. And if there's no bright moon out and you're far from city lights you'll see a dim, fuzzy star in Hercules called M-13. Through binoculars it looks like a tiny cloud but in reality is a tightly-packed ball of a million stars 150 light years wide and so far away the light we see this summer left this city of stars 25,000 years ago. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer





STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Monday 6/20/02 - 1100 - 1200 Eastern Time

One Hour Feed - 5 shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #02-30 /1285th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 7/22/2002 through Sunday 7/28/2002

"The Wonderful Cat's Eyes
Of Summer's Skies"

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers and don't you think it just a bit un-fair that of all the constellations named for animals not one of them is named for america's favorite household pet, the pussy cat? After all Orion is not only ac-companied by one but two of his favorite dogs, Canis Major the big dog and Canis Mi-nor the not so big dog. Oh, I know there's Leo the Lion and even a lynx but they would hardly qualify as household pets. So until somebody gets around to offi-cially naming a kitty in the cosmos we'll have to settle for the second best thing; the two mar-velous cat's eyes that appear every year in summer's skies. Never heard of them? Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for any night in July and August from after dark to midnight where if you look to-ward the south you will see summer's biggest constellation Scorpius the scorpion. It's one of the few constellations which actually looks like its name. It even has a red star where its heart should be named Antares, a humongous star 700 times wider than our own Sun plus you can even see how it's rather nasty tail curves around up and back on itself just like a real scorpion's with two stars marking it's poisonous stinger. Their Arabic names from left to right are Shaula and Lesath. And these names mean "the sting". In folk legend, however, they are not only "the sting" but are also the two eyes of an ancient celestial cat which stare out at us every single sum-mer.

Now although they don't appear to be all that exceptional to the naked eye, if we look deeper into these cat's eyes with a tele-scope we can see the secrets they have hid-den within them from human eyes for thousands of years. Wonderful secrets be-cause when we com-pare each star to our sun they are truly marvelous. Indeed while our Sun is about a million miles wide, Shaula is almost twice as wide. And it is a much hotter star than our yellow Sun and burns a fierce blue-white and is in fact 1200 times more lumi-nous. It looks dimmer only because it is 280 light years away which means that we see Shaula not as it exists now this sum-mer but as it existed when its light left it 280 years ago in 1722. Lesath, the dimmer of the two, is even more incredible and appears dimmer only because it is over 5 times farther away than Shaula, 1600 light years beyond which means that we see it not as it exists now but as it existed 1600 years ago around 400 A.D. And it burns an even fiercer blue-white hot than Shaula and is 15,000 times brighter than our sun, plus Lesath makes both Shaula and our Sun seem puny by compari-son because it is 2 1/2 times the diameter of Shaula and 7 times as wide as our Sun. Some pussy cat, eh folks? So get thee outside the next few weeks and find these two magical cat's eyes peering through summer nights as they silently ride across the south-ern sky masquerading as the sting of the scor-pion. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#02-30 M

7/22/2002 thru 7/28/2002

"Two Cat's Eyes Of Summer Skies"

Horkheimer: Although there's no constellation named for America's favorite household pet, there are 2 cat's eyes in summer skies. Look south for the fish-hook shaped pattern of stars, Scorpius the scorpion. The 2 stars which mark his stinger named Shaula and Lesath were also known in ancient times as the cat's eyes. Shaula which is 2 times as wide as our million mile wide Sun is so far away we see it as it existed 280 years ago. And humongous Lesath which is 7 times our Sun's diameter is so far away we see it as it existed 1600 years ago. Pretty impressive for a pussy cat. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!



How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Monday 6/20/02 - 1100 - 1200 Eastern Time

One Hour Feed - 5 shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #02-31 /1286th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 7/29/2002 through Sunday 8/04/2002

"How To Get Started In Astronomy and
The Two Comets That Never Were"


Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers. This week I'd like to tell you how to get started in astron-omy and show you how to find and actually see two comets that never ex-isted. Now in the 25 years we've been doing "Star Gazer" I can't tell you how many times people have asked me "How do I get started star gazing?". So right off the bat I'll tell you.

#1. If you watch "Star Gazer" regularly you'll get a taste for stargazing which I hope will make you want more. And if you miss an episode I'd like to remind you that you can download not only the current shows but shows for the past several months onto your computer and see them in streaming video ab-solutely free any time of night or day. Plus you can also down-load the script of this show and hundreds of shows complete with star charts and dia-grams. Simply log onto www.jackstargazer.com. Secondly, I rec-om-mend that you buy any children's book on the constella-tions. If it's simple enough for a child to understand, you'll understand it too. 3rd, attend the free meetings of a lo-cal astronomy club. Not only will you learn a lot but you'll get involved with people who love ama-teur astronomy and who'll let you look through their tele-scopes ab-solutely free. And fi-nally in this August's issue of "Reader's Digest" you'll find a wonder-ful ar-ticle on how to get started star gazing, to which yours truly, humbly contributed. But now I'd like to show you how to find two comets that never ex-isted but which you can actually see.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for any night in Au-gust in early evening. Look due south and you'll see a fish hook shaped group of stars which is Scorpius the scorpion. And if you're far from city lights just above Scorpius' stinger you'll be able to see two tiny fuzzy clouds which look like the heads of comets, but unlike comets they never de-velop tails and they never move in relation to the stars. They're always in the same place. These two comet heads that never were, were named M-6 and M-7 by Charles Messier, an 18th century as-tronomer who made a list of fuzzy cloud-like objects so he wouldn't get confused when he went comet hunting.

And although they really do look like de-capitated comet heads with the naked eye through a pair of binoculars, they re-veal themselves to be great clusters of stars, other suns far, far away. The one closest to the stinger, M-7 is a cluster of about 80 stars and is 800 light years away which means that the light we see now is actually the light that left these stars 800 years ago around 1200 A.D., 300 years be-fore Columbus set sail. The higher clus-ter M-6, also has about 80 stars in it but is quite a bit dimmer. The reason being that it is exactly twice as far away, 1600 light years beyond. Which means the light we see now is actually the light that left these stars 1600 years ago around 400 A.D. About the time of the fall of the Ro-man Empire. Wow! So get thee out to see M-6 and M-7 the two comets that never were and log onto our website at least once a week. Because once you get started star gaz-ing the universe is the limit. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!


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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#02-31 M

7/29/2002 thru 8/04/2002

"How To Get Started Stargazing"

Horkheimer: In the 25 years we've been doing "Star Gazer" I can't tell you how many people have asked me, "How do I get started star gazing?" So I'll tell you: No. 1 watch "Star Gazer" regularly. If you miss an episode you can not only download our scripts and star charts, but also see our shows on streaming video. No.2 buy any children's book on the constellations. If it's simple enough for a child to understand you'll understand it too. Third join a local astronomy club. You'll learn a lot plus you'll get to look through telescopes for free. Finally, you'll find a great article on how to get started in this August's issue of Reader's Digest to which yours truly humbly contributed. And once you get started stargazing the universe is the limit. Keep Looking Up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer

 

 



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