STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

3/20/2001 9:30 - 10:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


STAR GAZER

Episode # 01-14 / 1217th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 4/2/2001 through Sunday 4/8/2001

"The Planet Mars Is Getting Ready to Back Up!
And You Can Watch It Shift Into Reverse
From Your Own Back Yard"

 

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers and as I mentioned a few weeks ago, the red planet Mars is racing toward earth for its closest and brightest meeting with planet earth in 12 years this June. And it is brightening so rapidly it almost takes one's breath away. Let me show you: O.K., We've got our skies set up for this month of April just before dawn, facing south where you will see, close to the horizon, the fish-hook shaped pattern of stars called Scorpius the Scorpion with the brilliant red-orange star Antares marking its heart, Antares literally meaning 'The Rival of Mars'. And off to its left its rival namesake the ancient planet Ares, now named Mars, which right now is even brighter than Antares because it's racing toward us.

In fact it is heading for us so fast that it will more than double in brightness this month and then will double in brightness again next month. In fact by the end of May it will be brighter than the king of the planets Jupiter. And you can watch it brighten night after night. But you'll also be able to watch it do something else that's really fascinating, something astronomers call 'retrograde motion' which simply means that Mars will actually appear to back up in the sky, something which puzzled our ancestors for thousands of years. Let me explain:

Now back on February 20th Mars was near the head of the Scorpion and was moving eastward. By March 4th it had moved well past Antares, and by May 1st it will be even farther along. But on May 11th Mars will appear to stop moving and then will start to back up and move westward and make a bee line for Antares. But then on July 19th when it's at its very closest to Antares it will once again appear to stop moving. And the next day it will once again resume its eastward forward motion, heading for the teapot of Sagittarius, and will be just below the top star in the lid of the teapot during the 3rd week of September. So, why will Mars appear to back up?

Simple. Just think of earth and Mars like cars on a race track. Earth is on an inside track, Mars on the outside. Now because Mars always moves slower than earth, every once in a while when our earth overtakes Mars we look at it from a different direction and that makes it appear to back up as seen from our planet. It's simply a wonderful cosmic illusion, or perhaps I should say cosmic deception because it deceived our ancestors into believing that the planets were gods and had minds of their own. And every once in a while would back up just to show their displeasure with us mere mortals. So, get thee outside at least once a week before dawn, look south and watch the incredible brightening of the red planet and then after May 11th watch it shift into reverse. Isn't planet watching fun? I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#01-14 M

4/02/2001 thru 4/8/2001

"Watching The Planet Mars Go Into Reverse"


Horkheimer: Have you ever seen a planet back up? Well, you can watch Mars go into reverse starting next month. This week Mars is up to the left of Antares in Scorpius and on May 1st it will be even farther from it. But on May 11th is will appear to stop and then head back toward Antares. But on July 19th when it's at its closest to Antares it will again stop and resume its forward motion. So what's really happening here? Does Mars really back up? No, it's all a cosmic illusion. Like 2 cars on a race track, our earth on the inside track passes slower-moving Mars and for a few weeks we see Mars from a different direction. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer







STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

3/20/2001 9:30 - 10:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov




Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #01-15 /1218th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 4/9/2001 through Sunday 4/15/2001

"The Horse On The Handle Of The Big Dipper"

 

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers. Every April when I go outside in early evening and look north I'm reminded of that old phrase "April showers bring May flowers" because every April in early evening the Big Dipper is positioned in such a way that the cup is pointed downward so that its water would be pouring out onto the ground nourishing the flowers that will pop up in May. But it's not the cup we're going to look at this episode...It's the Dipper's handle, and more specifically, the horse on the handle. Let me show you:


O.K., We're facing due north in early evening in April and we can easily see four stars which trace out the Dipper's cup and the three stars behind which make up its handle. And we're going to pay attention to what looks like, to most people, the one star at the bend of the handle, the star named Mizar, a star which you have undoubtedly seen many, many times. But have you ever really looked closely at this star? Because those who have know that it has a secret. You see, if you look real close at Mizar you will see that it is not just 1 star, but 2. Indeed, right next to Mizar you will see a slightly dimmer star, a star named Alcor which in Arabic means 'the lost or friendless one'.

Now centuries ago it was said that these 2 stars, bright Mizar and dimmer Alcor, were used as a kind of ancient eye exam for one of an Arab sultan's armies. If a recruit could see the 2 stars he was in, if he couldn't he was out. But to tell you the truth it wasn't a very difficult eye test because even today with light pollution everywhere most people can see 2 stars, although admittedly nowadays I have to use my glasses. At any rate, long ago these 2 stars became popularly known as "the horse and the rider." Mizar of course being the horse and dimmer Alcor being the rider. And you can see them for yourself any night you can see the Big Dipper. And there our ancient eye test ends.

But it doesn't end there for modern eyes of a different kind, the eyes of a special device called a spectroscope because if we aim a spectroscope at Alcor the rider we would see that this so-called friendless one is not so friendless after all. In fact Alcor has a companion rider, another star invisible to the naked eye, thus making Alcor 2 riders on Mizar the horse. But hold on just a second, that's not exactly true either because if we look real close at Mizar we further discover that Mizar the horse is not just 1 star, or even 2 stars, not even 3 stars or 4 stars but is in fact a rare quintuple star. Wow!

In other words, when we look at this ancient Arab representation of a solitary horse with its solitary friendless rider, we are in reality looking at 2 horsemen driving a team of 5 horses across the night sky on the bend of the handle of the big dipper. Incredible isn't it? What modern astronomy reveals about objects that generations of mankind have seen for thousands of years. So, get thee outside, look for Mizar and Alcor, the horse and its rider, 2 visible stars which we now know are in reality, seven. Wow! Isn't star gazing wonderful? I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.



Star Gazer Minute

#01-15 M

4/09/2001 thru 4/15/2001

"The Horse On The Handle Of The Big Dipper"

 

Horkheimer: Ancient Arabs used the Big Dipper for an eye test and you can too.
Look north in early evening and if you look closely at Mizar, the star at the bend of the handle, you'll see a dimmer star, Alcor, right next to it. These 2 stars are known as the horse and the rider and the ability to see both got you into the sultan's army. But if we look closely through the eyes of a spectroscope we see Alcor is actually 2 stars and Mizar is actually 5 stars. So in reality we have 2 horsemen driving a team of 5 horses across the night sky. 7 stars where we see only 2. How's that for an eye test? I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

3/20/2001 9:30 - 10:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)

Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 01-16 / 1219th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 4/16/2001 through Sunday 4/22/2001

"Celebrate National Astronomy Day
On Saturday April 28th!
And The Moon Pays A Last Visit
To Saturn and Jupiter"
 

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers and mark Saturday, April 28th on your calendar as National Astronomy Day, a day when most astronomy clubs, planetariums and science centers all across the country will be celebrating with all kinds of things astronomical, including looking through telescopes, and usually free of charge. Now since 1973 National Astronomy Day is always observed in April or May on the sSturday closest to the 1st quarter moon.

You see, 1st quarter moons are always visible in early evening and they're much more interesting to observe through telescopes than a full moon. And last quarter moons don't rise until midnight. So a Saturday closest to a 1st quarter moon in April or May, when the weather is turning nice just fits the bill. So call your local planetarium, science center or astronomy club to see what they are doing Astronomy Day and check our web site. Now just coincidentally there will be 2 exquisite planets available for viewing just after sunset on astronomy day and for the next few weeks. Let me show you:

O.K., We've got our skies set up for the middle of next week which is Astronomy Week, Wednesday April 25th just after sunset, facing west where you'll still be able to see, although very low in the heavens, the 2 planets which have been providing such a spectacular sky show for the past few months in the constellation Taurus, the king of the planets, 88,000 mile wide Jupiter and the ringed planet, 75,000 mile wide Saturn. And an exquisite crescent moon with "the old moon in the new moon's arms" will be hovering just above Saturn and below Jupiter and to the left of the Pleiades, the Seven Sisters. Then on the 26th an even more exquisite crescent moon will be just beyond Jupiter. Once again, the 25th and the 26th.

Now these are the last 2 pairings of a waxing crescent moon and Jupiter and Saturn for the entire year. So please, if you have a telescope make sure you take a look at these two during the next couple of weeks because Saturn will disappear in early May and Jupiter in late May. Of course most astronomy clubs, planetariums and science centers will be showing you Jupiter and Saturn through their telescopes on astronomy day.

Now as many of you may recall, Jupiter and Saturn have been a close pair and have been playing celestial tag with The Pleiades for the past few months. But sadly that's about to end because Jupiter and Saturn are slowly pulling farther and farther apart. On Sunday April 1st they were only 10 degrees apart but by Sunday the 15th they were 11 degrees apart and by National Astronomy Day they will be 12 degrees apart, and rapidly moving away from each other.

So say good-bye to these two as a cosmic duo, playing tag with The Pleiades in Taurus, because as astronomer Robert Victor points out, these 2 planets won't appear together in Taurus again until 2059, 58 years from now. I'm really sad to see them go. At any rate enjoy all the free events and free telescopic viewing on National Astronomy Day. It'll be a great outing for the whole family. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#01-16 M

4/16/2001 thru 4/22/2001

"Celebrate National Astronomy Day
On Saturday April 28th!"

Horkheimer: Saturday April 28th is National Astronomy Day which means that astronomy club, planetariums and science centers will be doing all kinds of things astronomical, including looking through telescopes at the moon, Jupiter and Saturn, and usually for free. On Wednesday the 25th an exquisite crescent moon, complete with earth shine, will hover between 75,000 mile wide Saturn and 88,000 mile wide Jupiter. And on the 26th an even bigger crescent will be just beyond the king of the planets. And on Saturday, National Astronomy Day some organization near you is bound to let you look at them through their telescopes. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer





STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

3/20/2001 9:30 - 10:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #01-17 /1220th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 4/23/2001 through Sunday 4/29/2001

"The Surprising And Amazing Truth
About The North Star
And How To Find It"

 

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers and if someone asked you right now to name the brightest star we can see from planet earth, what would you say? Well, if you said "The North Star", you're wrong. But if you said Sirius, you're right. Don't feel too bad though if you said the North Star because most people think that the North Star is the brightest star, even though there are more than 50 other stars visible to the naked eye which are brighter. So why do so many people think that the North Star is the brightest star? Well, it's probably because people have heard the North Star mentioned more often than any other star and the reason it's mentioned more often is because its position in the sky makes it the most useful star. Let me explain:

O.K., We've got our skies set up so that we're facing north any night during the month of May between the hours of 8 and 10 your local time. And if you look up you'll easily see the Big Dipper, 4 stars make up its cup and 3 stars make its handle. And once you've found the Big Dipper you can easily find the North Star because all you have to do is take the 2 stars at the end of the cup, which are called the pointer stars, mentally measure the distance between them and then shoot an imaginary arrow 5-1/2 times that distance through them and that arrow will always land smack dab on the North Star.

And once you've found it you'll notice the North Star is indeed not the brightest star in the heavens and is in fact no brighter than the 2 pointer stars we used to find it. So why is it so important? Simple. The North Star is always due north, plus wherever you happen to be in the northern hemisphere it will always be the same number of degrees above the horizon as your latitude north of earth's equator. So before the invention of the compass this star was extremely important to navigators and explorers to determine not only what direction north was, but exactly how far north they were above the equator.

You see, we measure the distance from the equator to the north pole in degrees of latitude. The equator is zero degrees and the north pole is 90 degrees. We also measure the distance from any flat horizon to overhead in degrees, zero degrees at the horizon, 90 degrees overhead. So if you're at the north pole the north star will appear 90 degrees above the horizon or directly overhead. If you're in London it will appear 52 degrees above the horizon, in New York 40 degrees. And because Miami is so much closer to the equator it will appear 25 degrees above the horizon.

And you can check this out wherever you live because you'll always see the North Star due north, exactly the same number of degrees above a flat horizon as your latitude above the equator. Now you know why, although the North Star is not the brightest star it is the most important star. So if you're ever lost at night simply look for the north star because it will always be due north and if it's not you're either south of the equator or on the wrong planet. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#01-17M

4/23/2001 thru 4/29/2001

"The Amazing Truth
About The North Star"

 

Horkheimer: Most people think the North Star is the brightest star but there are 50 other stars which are brighter. So why is it so special? Simple. You can use it to find your direction and your latitude because it is always due north and it is always the same number of degrees above your horizon as your latitude. In London it's 52 degrees above the horizon, in New York, 40 degrees and in Miami, 25. To find it yourself look for the Big Dipper, shoot an arrow through the 2 stars at the end of the cup and it will land smack dab on the North Star. So if you're ever lost at night you'll not only be able to find due north, but you'll also know how far you are above the earth's equator. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only
Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer

 


 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

3/20/2001 9:30 - 10:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #01-18 /1221st Show
To Be Aired : Monday 4/30/2001 through Sunday 5/6/2001

"The Pink Iron Planet Makes Its Best
Evening Appearance Of The Year!
And Venus Makes Its Best Appearance
As The Morning 'Star'!"

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers and this week Venus reaches its greatest brilliancy as a morning star and Mercury begins its best evening appearance of the year and visits Saturn and Jupiter. Let me show you:

O.K., We've got our skies set up for this week and next just before sunrise, facing east where you'll see the 8,000 mile wide planet which was the star attraction as the brilliant evening star over the past few months but which has now changed personalities and is appearing as the morning star at its greatest brilliancy in morning skies just before sunrise this week. And even though it is dazzling and breathtakingly beautiful and will undoubtedly be mistaken for a UFO by many people, I personally still miss it as the brilliant evening star just after sunset.

And speaking of after sunset, if you look west/northwest this weekend, Saturday the 5th and Sunday May 6th, about 45 minutes after sunset and if you have a clear flat horizon, you'll be able to see the tiny 1st planet out from the sun, pinkish Mercury, hovering just below the Seven Sisters, The Pleiades, with Saturn up to its left and Jupiter up above Saturn. And if you watch night after night you will be able to see Mercury as it brightens and moves closer and closer to Jupiter. In fact, it will snuggle up next to Jupiter on Tuesday the 15th and Wednesday the 16th, 2 nights when you'll mentally be able to compare them side by side.

You see, while Mercury is a tiny 3,000 mile wide planet with a huge core made almost entirely out of iron, Jupiter is a gigantic 88,000 mile wide planet made almost entirely out of gas. In fact, Jupiter is so much bigger than Mercury we could line 30 Mercurys up side by side across Jupiter's middle. And while Mercury will be only 90 million miles away on the 15th and 16th, good old Jupiter will be 560 million miles beyond. Now if you watch Mercury and Jupiter the following week you will see that they will rapidly pull apart from each other and on Thursday evening the 24th an incredible crescent moon, complete with earth shine will be huddled right up next to the pink iron planet named for the messenger of the gods.

So there you have it. Venus at its greatest brilliancy this week as the morning star before sunrise in the east and Mercury making its best evening appearance of the year rising higher each night and visiting Saturn, then Jupiter, and finally pairing with an exquisite crescent moon on the 24th. What a wonderful way to start the month of May. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#01-18M

4/30/2001 thru 5/6/2001

"Mercury And Venus
Make Great Appearances"

 

 

Horkheimer: This week Venus reaches its greatest brilliancy as the morning star and Mercury begins its best appearance of the year. Face east before dawn and you'll see 8,000 mile wide Venus looking like a dazzling UFO. Then face west after sunset this weekend and you'll see tiny pinkish Mercury as it starts its climb past Saturn and toward Jupiter night after night until on the 15th and 16th 3,000 mile wide Mercury will huddle right next to 88,000 mile wide Jupiter, a planet so huge we could line 30 Mercurys up side by side across its middle. Talk about huge! I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only
Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer



[SmilinJack]Return to the [STAR GAZER Main Page]