STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Friday 3/20/07 - 1000-1100 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

 

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 07-14 / 1530th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 4/02/2007 through
Sunday 4/08/2007

"The Goddess Of Love Visits The Seven Sisters"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. On Wednesday evening April 11th the planet named for the Roman goddess of love, will pay a very close visit to one of the loveliest star clusters of them all, The Pleiades, the Seven Sisters. And you can start watching them get closer each night beginning this weekend. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Saturday April 7th, about one hour after sunset facing west where you will see super bright 8,000 mile wide Venus aptly named for the goddess of love because it is the brightest and most beautiful of all the naked eye planets. It's the brightest because in addition to it's being so close it is the most reflective of all the planets because it is enshrouded in a perpetual cloud cover which acts like a gigantic mirror reflecting sunlight back to Earth. But besides being beautiful to the naked eye if you have a small telescope you will notice that Venus appears to go through phases just like our Moon. Currently it is in a gibbous phase and looks like this.

But something special has been added this Saturday because if you have fairly dark skies you will see a tiny cluster of stars called the Seven Sisters, although most people can only count six with the naked eye. Some people think this cluster looks like a tiny dipper or a cluster of grapes, but in western tradition they are known as the seven daughters of Atlas who ride across the sky on the shoulder of Taurus the Bull and whose bright red eye Aldebaran can be seen up and to their left. Now on Saturday the sisters will be only five degrees away from Venus. Or if you'd like to think of it this way, since the full Moon is half a degree wide, ten full Moons could fit between Venus and the Seven Sisters. 24 hours later on Sunday evening they'll be only four degrees or eight full Moons apart. On Monday three and a half degrees or seven full Moons apart, on Tuesday only three degrees or six full Moons apart. But ta da! On Wednesday night the 11th they will be at their very closest only two and a half degrees or five full Moons apart which astronomically speaking is close!

And good luck abounds because if you're clouded out on Wednesday, on Thursday they'll still be only two and 3/4 degrees apart. And on Friday the 13th only 3 degrees apart. But the best night is Wednesday night! And to add to your viewing pleasure also use a pair of binoculars because you'll be able to see a lot more than seven sisters here. In fact we now know there are really about one hundred stars here in a sphere 14 light years in diameter, 400 light years away, wow! And that unlike our five billion year old Sun these stars are extremely young, only 70 million years old. Which means they were born only five million years before the dinosaurs got wiped out by a giant asteroid. So get thee out this weekend and start watching Venus and the Seven Sisters as they move closer and closer to each other each night. Keep looking up!

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#07-14 M

4/02/2007 thru 4/08/2007

"The Goddess Of Love Visits The Seven Sisters"

Horkheimer: On Wednesday April 11th the brightest planet Venus will meet the star cluster called the Pleiades, the Seven Sisters. About one hour after sunset face west and 8,000 mile wide, Earth-sized Venus will be super close to the Seven Sisters. With the naked eye you can count six stars, with binoculars, a couple dozen. In reality however the Seven Sisters are about 100 stars in a sphere 14 light years in diameter and so far away it takes 400 years for their light to reach us. Plus they are extremely young stars only 70 million years old, which means they were born only 5 million years before the dinosaurs got wiped out by a giant asteroid. Keep looking up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Friday 3/20/07 - 1000-1100 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode #07-15 /1531st Show
To Be Aired : Monday 4/09/2007 through Sunday 4/15/2007

"The Moon And Venus And The Red Eye Of Taurus
Meet In A Cosmic Triangle"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. If you'd like to see an exquisite triangle of three entirely different cosmic objects then mark Thursday evening April 19th as that night when our Moon and the planet Venus and the red star Aldebaran meet. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for next week Thursday April 19th one hour after Sunset facing west where the most dazzling thing you'll see will be the brightest planet of them all Earth-sized Venus. And parked just down to its right an exquisite crescent Moon complete with earthshine which will look like a grey black full Moon nestled within the crescent. And down to Venus' left the red star which marks the eye of Taurus the Bull, Aldebaran. And as you can easily see, if we draw lines between them they make an exquisite cosmic triangle and a very instructive one because these three objects are as different as three objects can be.

Venus for instance is a planet about the same size as our Earth, 8,000 miles wide, whereas our Moon is a natural satellite of a planet, our planet Earth and is only 2000 miles wide. And while both our Moon and Venus appear to shine extremely bright they do not in reality make their own light, but only shine by the reflected light of a star, the closest star our Sun. Indeed all stars make their own light. So when we look at Aldebaran we are seeing a self-luminous cosmic body. Now although Aldebaran, Venus and the Moon appear close to each other from our perspective nothing could be farther from the truth. In fact on the 19th the Moon will be only 225,000 miles away whereas Venus will be 102 million miles away. Aldebaran on the other hand will be 382 trillion miles away, or to put it this way, since light travels at a constant speed of 186,000 miles per second when we look at the Moon on the 19th we will see the light that left it about a second and a half ago. But we'll see the light that left Venus about nine minutes ago. Aldebaran on the other hand is so incredibly far away that we see the light that left it 65 years ago!

The only reason we can see Aldebaran at all from that distance is because it is so extremely huge. In fact, it is 40 times as wide as our almost one million mile wide Sun! So don't miss this exquisite sight Thursday night. And if you have a small telescope please use it because you'll be able to see that Venus goes through phases just like our Moon does and currently looks like a very tiny gibbous Moon. Aldebaran on the other hand won't look any bigger through a telescope, only much brighter although you'll be able to see how really red it is. But in case you're clouded out on Thursday the 19th, on Friday the 20th a slightly larger crescent Moon will be parked above Venus making yet another although much bigger cosmic triangle. But Thursday the 19th is the night you don't want to miss! Three very different cosmic objects await your viewing pleasure. Keep looking up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#07-15 M

4/09/2007 thru 4/15/2007

"The Moon And Venus And The Red Eye Of Taurus
Meet In A Cosmic Triangle"

Horkheimer: On Thursday April 19th our Moon, a planet and a star will make an exquisite cosmic triangle. One hour after sunset face west and you'll see the brightest planet Venus, down to its right an exquisite crescent Moon and down to its left the red star which marks the eye of Taurus the Bull, Aldebaran. Connect lines between them and voila! a magnificent cosmic triangle connects three objects as different as three objects can be. Venus is an 8,000 mile wide, Earth-sized planet, our Moon is a 2,000 mile wide natural satellite but Aldebaran is a blazing star 40 times as wide as our million mile wide Sun. What a triangle! Keep looking up!


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Friday 3/20/07 - 1000-1100 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 07-16 / 1532nd Show

To Be Aired : Monday 4/16/2007 through Sunday 4/22/2007

"Celebrate National Astronomy Day This Saturday
And Watch The Moon Visit Gemini, Saturn And Leo Next Week"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. This Saturday April 21st I encourage you to take your family to a nearby science museum, planetarium or astronomy club to celebrate National Astronomy Day because all across the U.S. there will be all sorts of astro-events this Saturday afternoon and astro-observing Saturday night. Plus at several institutions, Astronomy Magazine and Meade Telescopes are offering chances to win all kinds of astro-goodies including telescopes! Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Saturday April 21st just after sunset facing west where you'll see the brightest planet of them all, 8,000 mile wide, Earth-sized Venus. And if you happen to be at a National Astronomy Day event and look at it through a telescope you'll see that it goes through phases just like our Moon. And this weekend will look like a tiny gibbous Moon. And speaking of the Moon you'll also see a beautiful not quite first quarter Moon directly above Venus. And if you've never seen it through a telescope when it's in this phase it will knock your socks off. Next if you look southwest you'll see another bright light which is the ringed planet 75,000 mile wide Saturn. And I know that science museums, planetariums and astronomy clubs all across the U.S. will have their telescopes trained on it this Saturday and it too will knock your socks off.

So please don't miss this Saturday National Astronomy Day and to find out which institutions are offering a chance to win subscriptions to Astronomy Magazine and a fabulous computerized, automated, Meade go-to telescope go to our website www.jackstargazer.com for all the details. But don't go away, there's more. Because starting Saturday night you can watch the Moon pay a visit to several cosmic objects.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Sunday April 22nd the day after Astronomy Day and an almost first quarter Moon will be parked right underneath the two brightest stars of Gemini the Twins, Pollux and Castor and will make a wonderful cosmic triangle with them. And if you look closely at Pollux you'll notice that it is a different color than blue-white Castor and that'd because it's a much cooler star and has a yellowish orange tinge. The following night Monday the 23rd an almost first quarter Moon will have moved just beyond them. But the next night Tuesday the 24th you can use the Moon as a Saturn finder because it will be parked just to the right of it. But as close as the Moon is to Saturn on Tuesday, on Wednesday it will be even closer to the brightest star of Leo the Lion, the very hot blue white star Regulus, which marks his heart.

So there you have it Earth and the Moon in the west this Saturday National Astronomy Day night. And on Sunday the Moon visits Castor and Pollux, on Tuesday it visits Saturn and on Wednesday the heart of Leo the Lion. Keep looking up!


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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.

 


Star Gazer Minute

#07-16 M

4/16/2007 thru 4/22/2007

"Celebrate National Astronomy Day This Saturday"

Horkheimer: Saturday April 21st is National Astronomy Day which means that U.S. science museums, planetariums and astronomy clubs will be hosting all sorts of daytime astro events and night time free telescopic observing. Face west and you'll see the brightest planet, Earth-sized Venus, which through a telescope will look like a gibbous Moon. Just above it the crescent Moon though a telescope will take your breath away. And in the southwest 75,000 mile wide ringed Saturn will knock your socks off. Go to www.jackstargazer.com for more Astro-Day info and Meade Telescope and Astronomy Magazine freebies! Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Friday 3/20/07 - 1000-1100 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 07-17 / 1533rd Show

To Be Aired : Monday 4/23/2007 through Sunday 4/29/2007

"How To Find Uranus Using Mars As A Finder"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. And have we ever got something nifty for you to see. In fact three mornings in a row, Saturday, Sunday and Monday, April 28th, 29th and 30th you'll be able to easily find a planet rarely seen by many stargazers because it's so dim that you really need a bright object close by as a finder. I'm talking about the seventh planet Uranus and with clear skies and a bit of luck you'll be able to use Mars as a super finder. Now most amateur stargazers have seen the other naked eye planets. In their order out from the sun they are Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. And the reason they re seen easily and often is because they are quite bright against the background of stars.

But Uranus is a different story because it is so incredibly far away. You see whereas Jupiter is half a billion miles away and Saturn is a billion miles away, Uranus is almost twice as far as Saturn, two billion miles away. And even though it's eight times the diameter of Mars it is still always very dim as seen from Earth, thus the need for a bright planet finder. But it's worth looking for with the naked eye and especially through a pair of binoculars. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Saturday April 28th, one hour before sunrise facing east where close to the horizon you'll see a reddish gold light which is planet number four, 4,000 mile wide Mars. And if you've got really clear dark skies right next to it, less than one degree away which is less than the width of two full Moons side by side, you'll see a faint green light which is Uranus. But let me caution you. It is so dim that it is just on the edge of naked eye visibility, which means you have to have dark skies and really good eyesight. However if you have a pair of binoculars you'll have no problem finding it. In fact you'll be able to compare the difference in color between reddish-gold Mars and faint greenish Uranus. Even so keep in mind that Mars will be 91 times brighter than Uranus.

But if you're clouded out on Saturday, 24 hours later on Sunday the 29th they'll be even closer, only 3/4 of a degree or 1 1/2 full Moons apart. And if Sunday doesn't work for you on Monday the 30th they'll be only slightly more than one degree or two full Moons apart. Once again Saturday, Sunday, Monday. And please if you have a pair of binoculars use them. And if you have a small telescope you'll even be able to see not only the round disc of Mars but the round disc of Uranus. Now because Uranus is so far away it moves much slower in its orbit than our Earth. In fact it takes Uranus 84 years to make one trip around the sun. And it's a really weird trip because Uranus is tilted on its side. Plus even though we can't see them from Earth, Uranus has rings like Saturn. So get thee out this weekend with a pair of binoculars or a small telescope for a rare chance to use Mars to find Uranus. Keep looking up!


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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#07-17 M

4/23/2006 thru 4/29/2006

"How To Find Uranus Using Mars As A Finder"

Horkheimer: For three mornings in a row you'll be able to use the red planet Mars to find the dimmest of the naked eye planets Uranus. Even though it's eight times as wide as Mars it is always very dim because it is 2 billion miles away but on Saturday, Sunday and Monday the 28th, 29th and 30th if you look east one hour before sunrise you will easily see reddish gold mars and less than one degree away a faint green light which is Uranus. If you don't have really dark skies use a pair of binoculars and you'll easily find it. Uranus is weird because it is tilted on its side and is so far away it takes 84 years to make one trip around the Sun. See it now and keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer



STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Friday 3/20/07 - 1000-1100 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 07-18 / 1534th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 4/24/2006 through Sunday 4/30/2006

"Spring's Royal Sphinx Dominates Early Evening Skies"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. And now that the weather is warm enough for you to spend a little time outside in early evening without your long johns I'd like to suggest that sometime during this lovely month of May you go out and get a look at the most famous constellation of spring which for thousands of years has almost universally been associated with royalty and regal majesty. I'm talking about Leo the Lion. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for any clear night an hour or two after Sunset during may facing south where approximately 2/3 of the way up from the horizon to the zenith you will see the stars which make up the very ancient star pattern we call Leo. He is frequently depicted as a reclining sphinx with his two paws out in front of him and I'm sure that many an ancient Egyptian drew a correlation between this heavenly sphinx and their Earthly monumental statue. A very bright backward question mark or sickle shaped group of stars marks his head, mane and forepaws and a bright triangle of stars marks his rear. Leo's brightest star Regulus, which means the little king, marks the place where his heart should be. In fact Regulus' second, though lesser known, name in Latin is Cor Leonis, which means the heart of the lion. The Roman Pliny referred to it as the royal one and in ancient Greece it was called the king's star. And in ancient Mesopotamia it represented Amil-gal-ur a legendary king of the celestial sphere who in mythology ruled before the Great Flood.

But what our ancestors couldn't know about this royal heart of the king of the beasts and what modern astronomy tells us is that it is a star two times the size of our million mile wide Sun but so much hotter than our yellow Sun it shines blue white hot and 140 times brighter! And whereas it takes only 8 1/3 minutes for the light from our Sun to reach Earth, Regulus is so far away that it takes its light 77 years to reach us. How's that for royal grandeur? The second brightest star of Leo is the end star of his rear end triangle. It marks Leo's tail and is appropriately named Denebola, which means the lion's tail. It too is a great star although not as great as Regulus being only 1 1/2 times the size of our Sun and 14 times brighter. But it is twice as close to us as Regulus as it takes Denebola's light only 36 years to reach us.

So there you have it one of the most ancient constellations, always associated with royalty and as regal looking as the Sphinx itself. In fact as important as the Sphinx was to the early Egyptians this cosmic sphinx was even more important and was actually worshipped by them because the annual rise of the Nile River occurred every year when the Sun moved into Leo. So get thee outside to see this ancient lion king and ponder how many hundreds of generations have gazed up at these very same stars over the millennia. Keep looking up!


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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#07-18 M

4/30/2007 thru 5/06/2007

"Spring's Royal Sphinx Dominates Early Evening Skies

Horkheimer: Have you ever seen the royal sphinx of the heavens. Look south after sunset and you'll see Leo the Lion, which since ancient Egypt has been depicted as a sphinx. A backward question mark of stars marks his front and a triangle of stars, his rear. His brightest star Regulus is Latin for little king but little it's not. It is two times the size of our Sun and 140 times brighter and it takes 77 years for its light to reach us. Its second brightest star Denebola marks his tail. It is 1 1/2 times our Sun's size, 14 times brighter and it takes its light 36 years to reach us. I'll bet the Egyptian Sphinx is starry eyed with envy. Keep looking up!


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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


[SmilinJack]Return to the [STAR GAZER Main Page]