STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Wednesday 7/20/05 - 1000-1100 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 05-31 / 1443rd Show
To Be Aired : Monday 8/01/2005 through
Sunday 8/07/2005

"Next Week The Moon Visits The Two Brightest Planets
And The Perseid Meteor Shower Visits Earth"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Next Sunday the Moon visits the brightest planet Venus and on Tuesday the second brightest planet Jupiter. And early Friday morning the Earth is paid a visit by the Perseid Meteor Shower.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Sunday August 7th 45 minutes after sunset facing due west where you'll be greeted with a sight that will take your breath away, a sight that has been depicted in art since artists began drawing. The pairing of the two goddesses of the night, the beautiful planet Venus and our sister satellite the Moon in the shape of a wonderful crescent complete with Earthshine, which looks like a black full Moon nestled within the crescent. Up and to Venus' left is the second brightest planet Jupiter and on Monday night the 8th the crescent Moon will be right between them. But then on Tuesday the 9th a slightly fatter crescent will be parked just along side and beneath it. Don't miss these two close pairings because they are among the most beautiful cosmic sights you'll ever see. Remember Sunday the 7th the Moon visits Venus and Tuesday the 9th it visits Jupiter.

And if that's not enough to hold you for one week, on Friday morning the 12th from 2 a.m. to dawn the annual Perseid Meteor Shower will pay a visit to Earth and this year should be wonderful because there'll be no bright moonlight to wipe out the dimmer meteors. To see this meteor shower plan to go outside around 2 a.m. your local time and stay outside until twilight begins. But if you've got only an hour to spare go out an hour before it gets light out because that's when you'll see the most meteors. Face northeast and you'll see our old friends the Seven Sisters and just to their left the dim constellation Perseus which is where the Perseid Meteor Shower gets its name because all the meteors appear to originate from this part of the heavens. To see any meteor shower properly you need several things: Dark skies far away from city lights, a lawn chair, a blanket, plenty of patience and your trusty old naked eye. It you're far from city lights you may see 20 to 40 meteors per hour, most very faint but a few very bright. But just what are meteors anyway?

Well, although they look like shooting stars they are in fact simply specks of comet debris slamming into our Earth's atmosphere at speeds so fast that they cause the atmospheric gasses surrounding them to heat up and glow making streaks of light. And every August our Earth plows directly into a cosmic river of comet debris left by Comet Swift-Tuttle and this is what causes the Perseid meteor shower. So every time you see a Perseid meteor streak across the sky Friday morning remind yourself that what you are actually seeing is a tiny piece of comet litter plunging to its fiery death. Wow! What a week! Keep looking up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#05-31 M

8/01/2005 thru 8/07/2005

"Next Week The Moon Visits The Two Brightest Planets
And The Perseid Meteor Shower Visits Earth"

Horkheimer: Next week the Moon visits the two brightest planets and the Perseid meteor shower visits Earth. This Sunday look west and you'll see an exquisite pairing of the crescent Moon and the brightest planet Venus. And on Tuesday a slightly fatter crescent will pair up with the second brightest planet Jupiter. Wow! Plus early Friday morning face northeast, and if you're far from city lights you'll see the annual Perseid Meteor Shower which happens every August when our Earth plows directly into a cosmic river of comet debris. In fact each meteor you see is actually a tiny piece of comet litter plunging to its fiery death. Double wow! Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer







STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Wednesday 7/20/05 - 1000-1100 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



 

STAR GAZER

Episode #05-32 /1444th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 8/8/2005 through Sunday 8/14/2005

"Use The Moon This Weekend To Find
My Two Favorite Summer Constellations"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Beginning this weekend you can use the Moon for four nights to find my two favorite constellations of summer, which I hope will become your favorites once you've learned how to find them.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Saturday evening August 13th 9 p.m. your local daylight saving time facing due south where you'll see a wonderful 8 day old Moon which means it's just one day past first quarter at the very top of a pattern of bright stars which looks like a fish hook. In fact in ancient Hawaii it was believed that the demigod Maui used this fish hook to pull the Hawaiian islands up out of the ocean. The ancient Greeks and Romans however thought these bright stars looked more like the body of a scorpion. And indeed it really does fit the shape of a scorpion complete with a bright red star named Antares right where the red heart of the scorpion should be with two stars at the end of the upturned scorpion's dreaded stinger.

Now if it happens to be clouded out where you are this Saturday you can still use the Moon to find it on Sunday when a slightly fatter Moon will be just past Antares. Then the next night Monday the 15th the Moon pays a visit to my second favorite summer constellation Sagittarius which is a huge constellation half man and half horse but whose brightest stars form a pattern which if you draw lines between them look like a teapot. In fact the Moon will be right above the spout of the teapot Monday night, and if its clouded out on Monday, on Tuesday a slightly fatter Moon will be parked right next to the stars that mark the teapot's handle. Once again to find the scorpion start watching on Saturday and as the Moon moves from night to night it will slowly grow fatter. On Sunday night it is just past Antares and high above the stinger. On Monday it is parked right over the spout of the teapot of Sagittarius and on Tuesday right beside the stars that mark the handle.

How wonderful that two star patterns so close together really look like familiar easy to identify objects, a scorpion, or a fish hook, and a teapot. But as easy as they are to find especially if you use the Moon this weekend the wonders that these constellations contain are numerous and I'll give you just a couple. Antares, Scorpius' red heart star is second only to Orion's red Betelgeuse in size as far as red stars go. In fact if we could place Antares where our Sun is it would reach out past the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars and even Jupiter. Indeed it is so huge we could fit 216 million of our Suns or 281 trillion Earths inside it. Wow! Sagittarius is equally wonderful because it points directly toward the center of our Milky Way Galaxy which you can see any clear moonless night far from city lights. So get thee outside and find my two favorite summer constellations. It's easy, just keep looking up.

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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Star Gazer Minute

#05-32 M

8/8/2005 thru 8/14/2005

"Use The Moon This Weekend To Find
My Two Favorite Summer Constellations"

Horkheimer: You can use the Moon on four nights to find two of summer's best constellations. This Saturday face south and the Moon will be parked near the top of Scorpius whose bright red star Antares marks its heart. On Sunday it will be just past Antares and on Monday will be parked just above the spout of the teapot portion of Sagittarius. And on Tuesday will be next to its handle. Antares is so huge it could hold 216 million of our Suns or 281 trillion Earths and the spout of Sagittarius points directly to the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. Use the Moon to find the scorpion and the teapot. It's easy and fun! Keep looking up!


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Wednesday 7/20/05 - 1000-1100 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 05-33 / 1445th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 8/15/2005 through Sunday 8/21/2005

"A Preview Of Winter's Stars in August
And Saturn And Mercury Are Visited By The Moon"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. If you know when and where to look you can get a preview of the brightest stars of winter in the sultry days of August. Plus the Moon pays a visit to two morning planets to close out the month. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this weekend Saturday August 20th about 45 minutes before Sunrise facing east where you'll see several bright stars covering a huge area from east to southeast. In fact almost due east you'll see winter's super bright star Procyon, which marks the eye of Orion the hunter's little dog. And to its right just above the southeast horizon is the brightest star we can see from Earth Sirius, which marks the eye of Orion's big dog. And of course right above Sirius the unmistakable three stars evenly spaced in a row which mark the belt of winter's most famous constellation Orion himself, his two knee stars to the right and his two shoulder stars to the left. And directly above his shoulder stars Aldebaran the reddish star which marks the eye of Taurus the Bull. And to Taurus' left Capella the brightest star of winter's Auriga the Charioteer. And directly below him Castor and Pollux the two brightest stars of Gemini the Twins.

So even though nights may still be hot and sultry where you live at the end of August, every August if you get out just before Sunrise you can see all of the brightest stars of winter above the eastern horizon. But this year something has been added because directly below Castor and Pollux you will see two additional bright lights, which usually aren't there. Closest to the horizon the first planet out from the Sun, tiny 3,000 mile wide Mercury and just above him the exquisite ringed planet 75,000 mile wide Saturn. And as always may I remind you that whenever we look for Mercury we always need a clear flat unobstructed horizon because Mercury never gets really very high above it. Now if you watch both of these planets through the very end of August you will notice that Saturn is a little bit higher above the horizon each day while Mercury is slowly moving closer toward it.

And if you're one of those who never really knows for sure whether or not you've found the planets, well you can use the Moon at August's end as a finder. On Tuesday August 30th an old crescent Moon will be parked very close to Castor and Pollux and on Wednesday the 31st will be between Pollux and Saturn. On Thursday September 1st an extremely slender crescent Moon will be parked right between Saturn and Mercury and if you've got a really clear flat cloudless horizon on Friday September 2nd you may see one of the slenderest Moons you'll ever see parked right next to Mercury. So there you have it: all of winter's bright stars visible in the east just before sunrise at August's end. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.

 


Star Gazer Minute

#05-33M

8/15/2005 thru 8/21/2005

"A Preview Of Winter's Stars In August
And Saturn And Mercury Are Visited By The Moon"

Horkheimer: Did you know that you can get a preview of winter's brightest stars in the sultry nights of August? This weekend look east and all the major stars of winter will be in front of you, Procyon which marks the eye of Orion's little dog, Sirius the eye of his big dog and of course Orion himself, three stars for his belt, two for knees, two for shoulders. Above him Aldebaran the red eye star of Taurus the Bull and to his left Capella the brightest star of Auriga the Charioteer. And finally below Auriga the two brightest stars of Gemini the twins Castor and Pollux. Enjoy a bit of winter at the end of August. Just remember to keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer





STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Wednesday 7/20/05 - 1000-1100 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 05-34 / 1446th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 8/22/2005 through Sunday 8/28/2005

"The Two Brightest Planets Have A Super Close Meeting
And Mars Doubles In Brightness!"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Mark September as a wonderful month for planet gazing because not only will the red planet Mars double in brightness in September but the king and queen of the planets Venus and Jupiter have a super close meeting on the first day of the month. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for Thursday evening September 1st 45 minutes after Sunset facing west where you'll see the best meeting of the two brightest planets for the entire year, super bright, 8,000 mile wide, Venus, named for the Roman goddess of love and not quite as bright but much bigger and farther away, 88,000 mile wide Jupiter named for the Roman king of the gods. They will be only 1 and 2/10ths of a degree apart. Or to put it in practical terms, since a full Moon is only 1/2 a degree wide Jupiter and Venus will be little more than two full Moon widths apart which is really close and is the kind of dramatic sky picture that has captured the imagination of human beings for thousands of years. Please don't miss this sight. All you need to enjoy it is just your naked eye but if you have a pair of binoculars you'll be absolutely wowed. And even the cheapest telescope will show Venus looking like a tiny gibbous moon and Jupiter with four of its largest moons, three of which are larger than our own Moon, easily visible as bright points of light.

And I'd like you to think about this as you look at these two planets on Thursday night September 1st. Although they look close together as seen from Earth it is only a matter of our perspective. In reality they are very far apart from each other. Indeed on September 1st Venus will be only 105 million miles away while Jupiter will be a whopping 576 million miles away, a difference of 471 million miles. Wow!

Now if you miss this on September 1st due to inclement weather they'll still be pretty close on the second as they slowly pull apart night after night after night. And one other night you simply must mark on your calendar is Tuesday September 6th when an exquisite crescent Moon complete with Earthshine, which looks like a black full Moon nestled within the crescent, will be parked almost between them. So mark September 1st on your calendar for super close meeting night of the two brightest planets and September 6th as the night when they are joined by an exquisite crescent Moon. It's hard to find sky pictures as beautiful as these. And if that's not enough, to add to your planet viewing pleasure, if you go out in early September around 11 p.m. you'll see Mars rising in the east and if you watch it once a week you'll notice that it rises earlier each night so that by the end of the month it will be rising around 9 p.m. Plus from September 1st through the 30th it will double in brightness and will be brighter in fact than even the brightest star Sirius. Start your Mars watch now as it prepares for its super close, super bright meeting on Halloween! What a way to open September. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#05-34-M

8/22/2005 thru 8/28/2005

"The Two Brightest Planets Have A Super Close Meeting
And Mars Doubles In Brightness!"

Horkheimer: In September Mars doubles in brightness and the two brightest planets have a super close meeting. September 1st just after sunset 8,000 mile wide Venus will be little more than one degree away from 88,000 mile wide Jupiter, the closest meeting of the two brightest planets for the year, terrific to the naked eye, wonderful through binoculars and a knockout through a small telescope. Tuesday the 6th an exquisite crescent Moon joins them, another knockout picture. Around 11 p.m. look east and you can watch Mars double in brightness during September and become brighter than the brightest star Sirius as it races toward Earth for a spectacular close up on Halloween! What a great month. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Wednesday 7/20/05 - 1000-1100 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows

Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #05-35 / 1447th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 8/29/2005 through Sunday 9/4/2005

"The Three Brightest Planets In Early Evening
And The Ringed Planet In Early Morning"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers, what a great month for planets. Venus and Jupiter are still breathtaking just after sunset and are joined by a crescent Moon on the 6th, Mars continues its race towards Earth and gets brighter every night and rises before midnight. And after midnight Saturn rises and accompanies the Beehive Cluster across the heavens. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for Thursday this week September 1st 45 minutes after sunset facing west where you will see the two brightest planets Venus and Jupiter at their closest for the entire year in a sight that will knock your socks off not only to the naked eye but through a pair of binoculars and a small telescope. Don't miss this please. But if you do, you can continue to watch them slowly separate night after night still dazzling and still breathtaking. And then something very special happens next week Tuesday September 6th when an exquisite crescent Moon complete with earthshine, which is like a black full Moon nestled within the crescent, joins them in a sight that will simply blow you away. And if you continue to watch night after night they will continue to separate and you'll notice that Jupiter will dip lower and lower until it disappears below the horizon toward the end of the month leaving Venus alone to bedazzle us just after sunset. But to catch it at its highest make sure you watch while there's still some evening twilight.

Now between 11 and midnight look east and I guarantee that if you do this once a week you will be amazed at how much brighter Mars becomes week after week throughout September. In fact it will double its brightness from September 1st to the 30th and will rise a little bit earlier each night, and by the end of the month will be even brighter than the brightest star in the heavens Sirius, outshone only by the Moon, Venus and Jupiter. And if you have a small telescope you can begin to look for detail on the surface of this wonderful planet we're currently visiting and which will reach its closest and brightest two months from now on Halloween. But for those of you who like to do your planet viewing before dawn the most beautiful telescopic planet rises in the east around 3 a.m. at the beginning of the month. I'd suggest looking around 4 or 5 a.m. before morning twilight where you'll see bright Saturn right beside a tiny cluster of stars called the Beehive.

Now Saturn always looks best through a small telescope because then you can actually see its rings. But the Beehive Cluster looks its best I think through a pair of binoculars. In fact through a pair of binoculars you may count up to 40 stars in this tiny group, which does indeed look like a Beehive. Through a small telescope you'll count several more although there are about 200 stars nestled together in this group, which requires a large telescope to see. So there you have it, the two brightest planets just after sunset, Mars racing towards us before midnight and Saturn and the Beehive before dawn. Planet fun for everyone, keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#05-35 M

8/29/2005 thru 9/4/2005

"The Three Brightest Planets In Early Evening
And The Ringed Planet In Early Morning"

Horkheimer: Three bright planets dazzle before midnight and Saturn rides across the sky with the Beehive Cluster before dawn. On September first Venus and Jupiter are at their closest for the year and then slowly separate each night and on the 6th are joined by an exquisite crescent Moon. Around midnight look east and watch Mars as it doubles its brightness this month and becomes brighter than the brightest star in the sky. Before sunrise ringed Saturn appears next to a cluster of stars called the Beehive which reveal about 40 stars in a pair of binoculars and 200 in a big telescope. Four planets, count 'em for September. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


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