STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One Hour Feed STAH 902
Monday July 20, 2009, 1100-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 0931, 0932, 0933, 0934, 0935


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 09-31 / 1652nd Show
To Be Aired : Monday 8/03/2009 through
Sunday 8/09/2009

"Jupiter At Its Biggest, Brightest And Closest
Since The Beginning Of The 21st Century"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Next week, the largest planet in our solar system, Jupiter, will reach opposition. Which means it will be directly opposite the Sun as seen from the Earth and will be at its closest and thus biggest and brightest not only for the entire year but also since the beginning of the 21st century. And because it is directly opposite the Sun as seen from Earth it will be seen all night long from sunset to sunrise. In fact as the Sun sets in the west Jupiter will rise in the east and will slowly travel up the sky until it reaches its highest point around 1 a.m. After which it will slowly descend westward and will set in the west as the Sun rises in the east. So you can see Jupiter at its brightest since the beginning of the century all night long.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for opposition day, next Friday night August 14th just after sunset facing east and if you have a clear flat horizon you will soon see Jupiter start to rise. If you have a water horizon like a lake or the ocean it will be fun to see just how long it takes after sunset before you can actually see Jupiter appear. Most people however will have to wait about an hour or so after sunset until Jupiter clears buildings and trees on the horizon. But when you see it, it will be super bright and you'll be able to watch it all night long.

But what's this opposition stuff really all about? Well, if we could go out into space and play with time and the planets it's pretty easy to understand. Now it takes our Earth 365 _ days to make one trip around the Sun, which we call one Earth year. However because Jupiter is so far away it takes it 12 Earth years to make one trip around the Sun, thus one Jupiter year is 12 Earth years long. Plus because Earth moves so much faster than Jupiter, about every 13 to 14 months our Earth, Jupiter and the Sun will be lined up in a row so that Jupiter will be 'opposite' from where the Sun is as seen from Earth, thus the word opposition. And Jupiter is always closest to Earth at opposition.

But all oppositions are not equal regarding Jupiter's distance. On average Jupiter is about 500 million miles away. But when Jupiter was at opposition on November 28th in the year 2000, it was only 376 and a half million miles away. At opposition next Friday however it will be 2 million miles closer, 374 and a half million miles away. Wow! Which will make it look much brighter and bigger. So what can you expect to see? Just look east after sunset and see for yourself. With a pair of binoculars you'll be able to detect that it is a round globe plus you'll see pinpoints of light on either side of it, which are its four largest moons in a family of over 60 moons. Plus with even the cheapest telescope you'll be able to see many of Jupiter's layers of violent atmosphere which amateur planet photographer Don Parker images frequently from his balcony in Coral Gables, Florida. Happy opposition, Jupiter lovers! And keep looking up!

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"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
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Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#09-31 M

8/03/2009 thru 8/09/2009

""Jupiter At Its Biggest, Brightest And Closest
Since The Beginning Of The 21st Century""

Horkheimer: Next week the largest planet will be at its closest, biggest and brightest since the beginning of the 21st century. And you can see it all night long. Next Friday about an hour after sunset face east and you'll see Jupiter rising, it will slowly travel higher until it will reach its highest point at 1 a.m. after which it will slowly descend and set in the west at sunrise. Jupiter comes close to us about every 13 months. On average it's about 500 million miles away, but next Friday it will be only 374 million miles away! With binoculars or a small telescope you'll be able to see its four largest moons in a family of over 60. Happy Jupiter watching and keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One Hour Feed STAH 902
Monday July 20, 2009, 1100-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 0931, 0932, 0933, 0934, 0935


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode #09-32 /1653rd Show
To Be Aired : Monday 8/10/2009 through Sunday 8/16/2009

"The Two False Comets Of Scorpius And How To Find Them"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Everyone loves it when news of an approaching comet hits the press. And although I'd love to announce that there's a big comet coming, such is not the case. I can however, show you how to find two objects which are comet imposters and have fooled many people into thinking they were real. I call them the two false comets of Scorpius.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for any night this week and next in early evening when there'll be no moonlight to hide these two phonies from view, because you have to have dark skies to see them. Simply look south just after dark and you will see a fish hook shaped group of stars which is called Scorpius the Scorpion, which is one of the few star patterns which actually looks like its name. In fact it even has a bright red star Antares, right where its heart should be. Then if you follow the scorpion's body down around its tail and up to its stinger you'll be able to see two tiny fuzzy clouds, which look exactly like the heads of comets when they're far away and on their approach to Earth. In fact most comets as they make their journey toward our Earth and Sun always look like tiny q-tips nestled among the stars. But q-tips which move from night to night and get bigger and bigger as they get closer and closer and eventually develop incredibly beautiful gas and dust tails. But not these two tiny fuzzy clouds because unlike comets these two will never develop tails and they will never move in relation to the stars and they'll never get any bigger or brighter. They'll always be in the same place and look the same.

Although they have been seen for thousands of years they weren't officially named until the 18th century when an astronomer named Charles Messier who made it part of his life's work to make a list of fuzzy cloud-like objects in the heavens so that he and other astronomers would not get confused when they went comet hunting. They're objects number 6 and 7 on his "fuzzy cosmic clouds, not-to-be-confused with comets, list". And today we use the first letter of Messier's last name when we refer to them. So they are now called M-6 and M-7. Now although they really do look like decapitated comet heads to the naked eye, through binoculars they reveal themselves to be much different because they are far more grand than comets.

Indeed each tiny cloud is a great cluster of stars, other suns far, far away. The one closest to the stinger M-7 is a cluster of about 80 stars and is 800 light years away which means that the light we see now is the light that left these stars 800 years ago around 1200 a.d., 300 years before Columbus set sail. The higher cluster, M-6 also has about 80 stars in it but you'll notice that it is quite a bit dimmer. Because it is exactly twice as far as M-7, 1600 light years away, which means that the light we see now is actually the light that left these stars 1600 years ago around 400 a.d. about the time of the fall of the Roman Empire. Wow! So get thee out to see the two false comets of Scorpius this week and next while there's no bright moonlight to hide them. Keep looking up


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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#09-32 M

8/10/2009 thru 8/16/2009

"The Two False Comets Of Scorpius And How To Find Them"

Horkheimer: This week and next you can see the two false comets of Scorpius. Look south in early evening for the fish hook shaped constellation Scorpius the Scorpion. Antares marks its heart and two stars mark his stinger. And just above the stinger on a dark moonless night you can see two tiny fuzzy clouds called M-6 and M-7, which look like decapitated comet heads. M-7 is actually a cluster of 80 stars 800 light years away which means the light we see right now is the light that left it in 1200 a.d. M-6 also has 80 stars but is 1600 light years away which means that the light we see now left it in 400 a.d. Wow! Use binoculars for a super close up view of these two false comets of Scorpius! Keep looking up!


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One Hour Feed STAH 902
Monday July 20, 2009, 1100-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 0931, 0932, 0933, 0934, 0935


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode # 09-33 / 1654th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 8/17/2009 through Sunday 8/23/2009

"The Planet King Dazzles And How To Use The Moon
To Find One Of The Largest Visible Stars"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Mark next week Thursday the 27th, as the night you'll be able to use the Moon to find one of the largest stars visible to the naked eye. And while you're out there make sure you catch this month's king of the planet's show because right now Jupiter is at its closest and biggest and brightest since the beginning of the 21st century. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for next Thursday August 27th between 9 and 10 p.m. your local time facing due south where the two brightest things you'll be able to see are an exquisite first quarter Moon and to its left in the southeast a super dazzling Jupiter which is the largest planet in our solar system although the second brightest because it is so much farther away than the brightest which is Venus. Jupiter is very special right now because it was officially at opposition on August 14th and is still very close and very bright.

And you'll be able to watch it travel across the sky almost all night long. It rises at sunset, is highest at 1 a.m. and sets at Sunrise. And with a pair of binoculars or small telescope you'll actually be able to see four pinpoints of light which are the four largest of Jupiter's 60 plus known moons and which constantly change their positions as they orbit Jupiter. In fact you can see the difference in just a few hours. And believe it or not, all but Europa are larger than our own Moon. So don't miss Jupiter up all night!

But now let's use the Moon to find one of the largest stars visible. Indeed all you have to do on Thursday night the 27th is look to the right of the Moon because it will be parked right next to it. It is a red star named Antares and it marks the heart of the super constellation Scorpius the scorpion whose stars whose stars look something like a giant fish hook or the capital letter 'J' if we connect them with imaginary lines. And believe me, Antares is a true super star, which will absolutely wow you.

O.K. If we could go out into space we would see that our Moon is about 250,000 miles away from earth. Our Sun however is 93 million miles away, whereas Jupiter is on average a whopping half a billion miles away, roughly 500 million miles. Now our Moon is about 2000 miles wide, Jupiter is 88,000 miles wide but our Sun is almost a million miles wide! Antares however is another story altogether. You see if we could place one edge of Antares where our Sun is it would stretch out past the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth and Moon, Mars, even past Jupiter. In fact Antares is about 100 million miles bigger than the entire distance from the Sun to Jupiter, 600 million miles wide. So huge we could fit over 350 million of our Suns inside it. Wow! So use the Moon as a super duper star finder Thursday evening the 27th and watch Jupiter dazzle all night long. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

 

Star Gazer Minute

#09-33 M

8/17/2009 thru 8/23/2009

"The Planet King Dazzles And How To Use The Moon
To Find One Of The Largest Visible Stars"

Horkheimer: Thursday night the 27th you can use the Moon to find one of the largest stars visible. Between 9 and 10 face south and you'll see super dazzling Jupiter at its closest and brightest since the beginning of this century. Right next to the Moon you'll see the red super star Antares, which marks the heart of Scorpius. Our Sun is so huge, almost a million miles wide, we could fit over 1 _ million Earths inside it. Antares however is 600 million miles wide. So huge we could fit over 350 million of our Suns inside it! In fact if we placed one edge of it where our Sun is it would stretch out past the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, even Jupiter. Wow! Use the Moon to find it on Thursday the 27th. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

One Hour Feed STAH 902
Monday July 20, 2009, 1100-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 0931, 0932, 0933, 0934, 0935


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode # 09-34 / 1655th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 8/24/2009 through Sunday 8/02/2009

"How To Find Mars During This Week's Annual Celebration Of
The Great Mars Myth And Misunderstanding"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. If you'll indulge me for a moment I'd like to replay the opening of the Star Gazer episode for the last week of August, 2003. And please keep in mind that this is only a repeat of an episode which aired exactly 6 years ago this week. Insert: "Mars Closer To Earth This Week In Almost 60,000 Years! Only Neanderthal Man Has Ever Seen It This Bright!" - Greetings, greetings and yes this is the week we've been waiting for. The week when Mars is closer to Earth and brighter than it's been since 57,617 b.c. And you can see it all night long. Let me show you.

So that is what was happening with Mars six years ago this week but for some reason every year in late July and early August misinformation with international coverage on the web says it's happening all over again this week. And that Mars will be so close that it will look as large as the full Moon. But please folks, such is not the case. And even back in 2003 Mars never looked as large as the full Moon. Back then it was reported that Mars would look as large as the full Moon but only if you magnified it 75 times in a telescope. Even so when Mars is magnified 75 times in a telescope it still doesn't really look as big as a full Moon because of human perception quirks. As NASA's Dr. Tony Philips says " To see Mars as big as a full Moon you'll need a rocket ship." so don't get fooled by the great Mars myth and misunderstanding, which will probably pop up every August until doomsday. But Mars is out there and it really does look nifty. Want me to show you how to find it?

O.K., simply go outside about 5 a.m. any day this week and next, look due east and just above the horizon you'll see the brightest planet of them all Venus which is super dazzling. But if you look up and to the right of Venus you'll also see much dimmer ruby gold Mars. And in case you're wondering what the difference is between Mars this August and August 2003, well on August 27, 2003 when Mars was at its closest it was only 34 1/2 million miles away. This week however Mars is much farther away, 152 million miles away which means that it is 117 1/2 million miles farther away this week than in '03. Plus it is 40 times dimmer! But it is still wonderful to see because it is the planet where so much Earth activity is occurring both on its surface in the form of Rovers and around it in the form of orbiters. Indeed we know a lot more about Mars now that we did 6 years ago and have a lot better closeups.

And as I reminded you at the end of that show in 2003, you can sometimes tell the general weather on Mars just by looking at its color. Generally speaking if weather conditions are clear on Mars, Mars will look more red than gold because we will be able to see its rusty surface. But if a planet wide dust storm whips up, as happens frequently, the reddish surface color will be obscured and Mars will look more yellow gold. Remember: red means clear weather on Mars and yellow means a humongous dust storm. So enjoy Mars at its "not closest in 60,000 years" this week. Keep looking up!


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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#09-34 M

8/24/2009 thru 8/30/2009

"How To Find Mars During This Week's Annual Celebration Of
The Great Mars Myth And Misunderstanding"

Horkheimer: Remember this from 2003? This week Mars is closer to Earth and brighter than it has been in almost 60,000 years! Why? Well that happened 6 years ago this week but every year the internet is flooded with reports that it's happening again and that Mars will look as big as the full Moon. But it's just an urban myth. 6 years ago this week Mars was at its closest in 60,000 years only 34 _ million miles away. This week however it's 152 million miles away and 40 times dimmer! You can see it every morning. About an hour before sunrise face east and right above dazzling Venus you'll see ruby gold Mars. If Mars looks more red it means it's clear weather on Mars. If it's more yellow it means there is a huge dust storm raging. Catch it when it's "not at its closest in 60,000 years." Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer



STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

One Hour Feed STAH 902
Monday July 20, 2009, 1100-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 0931, 0932, 0933, 0934, 0935


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode # 09-35 / 1656th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 8/31/2009 through Sunday 9/06/2009

"Celebrate Labor Day The Cosmic Way
With A Giant Triangle Of Stars Overhead"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Do you know that every Labor Day weekend three very bright stars, which make a giant triangle shine overhead? Let me show you how to find them this and every Labor Day weekend. Simply go outside between 9 and 10 p.m. your local time any Labor Day weekend and look straight up almost overhead and you will see three extremely bright stars which if we connect with lines make a huge stellar triangle which is traditionally called the Summer Triangle because every year these three stars can be seen rising over the eastern horizon in early evening at the beginning of summer.

But since the stars change their position with each season by the time September rolls around this triangle has changed its position so that in early evening it is almost directly overhead and makes an almost perfect must-see Labor Day tradition. Now each star belongs to a separate constellation. So not only do we also have three wonderful stars we have three equally wonderful constellations. The brightest star is Vega and it belongs to the small constellation Lyra the Harp. The second brightest is Altair in a much larger constellation called Aquila the Eagle. And the dimmest of the three is Deneb which marks the tail of a huge constellation called Cygnus the Swan.

Now if we compare each of these three stars with the star we call our Sun you'll be in for a big surprise. Our Sun is the closest star only 8 1/3 light minutes away which means it takes its light 8 1/3 minutes to reach us, so we see it not as it actually exists now but as it existed 8 1/3 minutes ago. Altair is the closest triangle star and is 17 light years away, which means that it takes its light 17 years to reach us. So we see it not as it exists this Labor Day weekend but as it existed 17 years ago. Wow! Vega is slightly farther, 25 light years away which means that it takes its light 25 years to reach us so we see it as it existed 25 years ago. Wow again! Deneb however is so incredibly far away, 1500 light years, that it takes its light 1500 years to reach us so we see it as it existed 1500 years ago! Super wow!

And talk about size and brightness! Altair is 1 1/2 times the diameter of our almost 1 million mile wide Sun and 9 times brighter. Vega however is 2 1/2 times the diameter of our Sun and is 58 times brighter. But you ain't seen nothing yet because Deneb is a super 116 times as wide as our Sun and 60,000 times brighter! In fact if it were as close as Vega and Altair it would be the brightest star in the night sky. Wowee, wow, wow! So there you have it. Three bright stars forming a giant triangle almost overhead in early evening every Labor Day weekend. So why not make this brilliant threesome a Labor Day Tradition? Happy Labor Day and Keep looking up!


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"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
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Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#09-35 M

8/31/2009 thru 9/06/2009

"Celebrate Labor Day The Cosmic Way
With A Giant Triangle Of Stars Overhead"

Horkheimer: On any moonless night in August you can use an ancient archer's arrow to find two cosmic wonders. Look south for the fish hook shaped constellation Scorpius and directly behind it the teapot portion of Sagittarius. Sagittarius was a mythical creature, half man and half horse. A master archer whose bow and arrow are marked by the front half of the teapot. His arrow is aimed at both Antares, the giant red heart star of Scorpius which is 700 times wider than our Sun and also at the center of our Milky Way Galaxy which is the family of 200 billion stars to which our Earth and Sun belong. The Milky Way is widest between Sagittarius and Scorpius because the great bulging central hub of our galaxy lies beyond. So use Sagittarius to find the scorpion's heart and the heart of our galaxy. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


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