STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

11/20/2000 9:30 - 10:00 am Eastern time (4 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


STAR GAZER

Episode # 00-49 / 1200th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 12/4/2000 through Sunday 12/10/2000

"The Holiday Star Gets Higher and Brighter!

And Using The Moon To Find The 2 Largest Planets"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and as many of you have noticed, our holiday star for the year 2000 is rising a little bit higher each night and will continue to brighten all month long. To find it simply go outside just after it gets dark out, look southwest and there you'll see it shimmering like a dazzling diamond in the sky. But be sure you look just after it gets dark out because it will set about 3 hours later. And if you want to know exactly what the so-called holiday star is I'll tell you all about it in our Christmas week show or you can visit our web site: www.jackstargazer.com.

And now the sensational planet show of this year continues, so let me show you: O.K., we've got our skies set up for Friday night, December 8th, one hour after sunset, facing east where you will see a not quite full moon and to its left, almost on a straight line, you will see 2 bright dots of light. The first and the dimmer is the 75 thousand mile wide ringed planet, Saturn, and the second and brighter, the 88 thousand mile wide planet Jupiter, the two largest planets in our solar system. Now on the next night, Saturday December 9th an almost full moon will make a lovely triangle with them although the brilliance of the moon will by contrast lessen Jupiter and Saturn's usual brightness.

And if you want to see how fast the moon moves, then go out once an hour and watch the moon change its position as it moves farther away from Saturn and closer to Jupiter. Indeed, about 2 hours before sunrise, if you look toward the west you will see that the moon is no longer between Jupiter and Saturn, but is right next to Jupiter. And about one hour after sunset on Sunday the 10th it will be well past the two and because the moon will be so much farther away from Jupiter and Saturn, they will look much brighter because there will be less moon glow to overwhelm them.

But the real fun will come all next week because if you go out one hour after sunset before the moon appears in the sky you will see the true brilliance of Jupiter and Saturn, Jupiter at its brightest for the year and Saturn at its brightest in a quarter of a century. Plus you will also have a chance to see the visually much dimmer, but in reality gigantic red star which marks the eye of Taurus the Bull, Aldebaran. And if you draw a straight line from Aldebaran up through Jupiter you will also see the exquisite star cluster The Pleiades, the Seven Sisters. And because there will be no moonlight they will be much easier to see. And think of this as you gaze upon these 4 exquisite cosmic objects... while Jupiter is only 380 million miles away right now, Saturn is twice as far, 765 million miles away. Aldebaran however is 1/2 a million times farther away at a distance of 65 light years which although overwhelming, when you think about it, is nothing compared to the Pleiades which is a cluster of stars 410 light years away. Wow! What a wonderful week for planet and star gazing. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 


Star Gazer Minute

#00-49 M

12/4/2000 thru 12/10/2000

"Three Planets For Christmas"

 

Horkheimer: This holiday season will be very special because we have three planets this year for Christmas. Look southwest 1 to 2 hours after sunset and the most dazzling of the planets, 8,000 mile wide Venus just begs to be called The Holiday Star. And it will be even higher and brighter by Christmas. Look east and you'll see the king of the planets, 88 thousand mile wide Jupiter at its brightest this year and to its right 75 thousand mile wide ringed Saturn at its brightest in 25 years. So if you're thinking of a telescope for someone for Christmas this couldn't be a better year. Three planets for the holidays brought to you courtesy of the cosmos. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer








STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

11/20/2000 9:30 - 10:00 am Eastern time (4 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov




Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #00-50 /1201st Show
To Be Aired : Monday 12/11/2000 through Sunday 12/17/2000

"The Eclipse of The Sun

On Christmas Day

and How To View It Safely"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and remember that old song, " I saw three ships come sailing in on Christmas Day in the morning"? Well this Christmas Day morning, Monday December 25th you'll be able to sing "I saw an eclipse of the sun come sailing in on Christmas Day in the morning", because this Christmas Day, Monday the 25th in the morning all of North America will be treated to a partial eclipse of the sun. And although it won't be a total eclipse it will still be worth observing. Now a total eclipse of the sun occurs whenever the new moon lines up directly between the earth and the sun and thus for a few brief moments completely covers the sun which will not happen this Christmas Day morning. Instead the moon will cover up only a part of the sun. That's why we call it a partial eclipse.

And depending upon where you live you will see either more or less of the sun partially covered. In general the farther south you live the less of the sun will be covered. For instance, at maximum eclipse only 15% of the face of the sun will appear covered from Los Angeles whereas in Montreal 61% will be covered. To find out how much of the sun will be covered from where you live, check your local newspaper 1 or 2 days before Christmas or go to our website <www.jackstargazer.com>. Now in all fairness I have to tell you this: if no one told you a partial eclipse of the sun was taking place most of you would probably not even notice because the sun doesn't really dim down until more than 90% of it is covered. But what you can see if you use the proper techniques is the moon slowly taking a small chunk out of the disc of the sun.

Now under no circumstances should you observe this eclipse by looking directly at the sun for even a few seconds and never ever look at the sun through a pair of binoculars or a small department store telescope because you could do very serious damage to your eyes before you'd feel even the slightest amount of pain.. You can view it through special inexpensive mylar glasses which will be available in many areas, but the easiest, cheapest and safest way to view it is by projecting the sun's image onto a piece of paper by making a simple pin hole projector. Simply take 2 stiff pieces of white paper or cardboard. Cut a small square hole in one piece of cardboard and tape a piece of aluminum foil over the hole. Then take a pin and poke a tiny hole in the center of the aluminum foil. Then to view the eclipse stand with your back to the sun and let light pass through the pin hole onto the second piece of paper or cardboard which will be your viewing screen, and as the moon slowly passes in front of the sun you will see a bigger and bigger bite out of the sun on your viewing screen. Once again, under no circumstances look at the sun directly with the naked eye, a small telescope or binoculars. Use the pin hole projector technique, but do not look at the sun through the pin hole. I'm Jack Horkheimer, merry partial eclipse of the sun on Christmas morning and Keep Looking Up!

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 


Star Gazer Minute

#00-50 M

12/11/2000 thru 12/17/2000

"The Christmas Day Eclipse"

 

Horkheimer: Remember that old song, " I saw three ships come sailing in on Christmas Day in the morning"? Well this Christmas Day morning an eclipse of the sun will come sailing in and all of North America will be treated to a partial solar eclipse which means that unlike a total eclipse, where the moon covers up the entire face of the sun, only part of the sun's face will be covered. And just how much depends on where you live. To find out eclipse times for your area and how to make a pin hole projector, which is the safest way to view it, go to our web site and your local newspaper. And remember, never ever look at the sun, eclipse or not, with the naked eye, binoculars or a small telescope. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

11/20/2000 9:30 - 10:00 am Eastern time (4 shows)

Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 00-51 / 1202nd Show

To Be Aired : Monday 12/18/2000 through Sunday 12/24/2000

"Now's The Time to Use

Your New Telescope and Binoculars

Because 3 Outrageously Wonderful Planets

Bring The Year 2000

To A Spectacular Sky Show End"
 

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and yes indeed, the year 2000 will end with a spectacular show of 3 incredibly bright planets nestled among the bright stars of early winter. And if you get a new telescope or a pair of binoculars for Christmas now is the time to take a look. Let me show you. O.K., we've got our skies set up for this week and next, 1 hour after sunset facing southwest where you'll see this year's brilliant holiday star, which is not a star at all, but the same size as our earth, 8 thousand mile wide, nearest neighbor planet, Venus, out dazzling everything else in the heavens. But make sure you see it within 1 to 3 hours after sunset because Venus never gets very far away from the sun and always sets shortly after it. And if you have a new telescope you will notice that it currently looks like a tiny just past first quarter moon.

And speaking of moons our moon will pay a visit to Venus next week. Go outside Wednesday the 27th just after dark and you will see a tiny sliver of a moon, complete with the old moon in the new moon's arms close to the southwest horizon. And the next night a slightly fatter crescent, complete with earth shine will be much closer to brilliant Venus. But the next night, Ta Da!, will be the winner of them all because on Friday the 29th the moon and Venus will form a cosmic pair that will absolutely take your breath away. And if you have a new pair of binoculars or a telescope, Friday the 29th is the night to use them because then you can compare the two of them side by side when our 2,000 mile wide moon will be only 251 thousand miles away and 8 thousand mile wide Venus 76 million miles away.

But if that's not enough, then simply look toward the east about an hour after sunset and you'll see the brilliant king of the planets, 88 thousand mile wide Jupiter and the second largest planet, 75 thousand mile wide ringed Saturn at its best in 25 years. And if you look at them through even the cheapest telescope you will be able to see not only the faint colored bands around Jupiter but even 1, 2, 3, or even 4 of its largest moons looking like tiny pinpoints of light lines up on either side. And Saturn with its rings will make a spectacular view. And remember Saturn is at its brightest since 1975 and around midnight Jupiter will be at its highest since 1989. Jupiter is still situated midway between the Pleiades, the Seven Sisters, and the red star of Taurus the Bull, Aldebaran. And if you look at the Pleiades through your new telescope or binoculars you will like wise be greeted by an exquisite sight. What a fabulous way to end the year 2000. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 


Star Gazer Minute

#00-51 M

12/18/2000 thru 12/24/2000

"Three Holiday Planets"

 

Horkheimer: If you got a new telescope for Christmas now is the perfect time to use it because three planets are up in early evening . Look east after sunset and you'll see Jupiter and through a small telescope several of its moons looking like dots of light. Plus Saturn at its brightest in 25 years is absolutely breathtaking through a small telescope. Look southwest and Venus will bedazzle you. And in a scope will look like a tiny just-past-first quarter moon. On the 28th a crescent moon with earthshine approaches Venus. And on Friday the 29th makes one of the most spectacular pairings with Venus for the entire year. Three planets for Christmas and the New Year. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

11/20/2000 9:30 - 10:00 am Eastern time (4 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #00-52 /1203rd Show
To Be Aired : Monday 12/25/2000 through Sunday 12/31/2000

"Ring In The New Year The Cosmic Way!

With The New Year's Eve Star

and Two Wonderful Planets!"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and once again I'm going to tell you about something that will happen every New Year's Eve for as long as you live, something that to me is almost magical because of its sheer coincidence. You see, at the stroke of midnight every New Year's Eve the brightest star in the heavens reaches its highest point above the horizon and shines like a dazzling beacon welcoming in the new year. Let me show you: O.K., first let's take a look at the skies at 8 p.m. your local time, New Year's Eve. We're facing due south and like all good astronomers let's draw an imaginary line which divides the eastern half of the sky from the western half, an imaginary line called the meridian which runs from the horizon due south up to the zenith point and then down the other side of the sky to the horizon due north.

Now as the earth slowly and endlessly rotates from west to east we are nightly treated to the grandest illusion in nature, that of watching the stars seem to rise in the east, slowly travel across the sky all night long and set eventually in the west. And if you watch carefully you will eventually deduce that the highest point any star reaches above the horizon in its nightly journey is when it is smack dab on the meridian. Now this is very important to telescope users because the higher a sky object is above the horizon, the better its telescopic image will be.

So several years ago when I was researching which planets would be high up off the horizon for viewing that New Year's Eve I stumbled across something which to me was an amazing coincidence,something which I had never read about in any astronomy book. And that coincidence is : No matter where you happen to be on New Year's Eve, as hour after hour goes by,the brightest star in the heavens, Sirius will slowly climb up the southeastern sky and at midnight will reach its highest point and be on the meridian. Think of it... the brightest star visible from our planet reaches it highest point above the horizon at midnight every year on New Year's Eve. How wonderful, how poetic, almost like a cosmic reminder that this most brilliant of stellar lights is welcoming in and shining on the new year, giving us all hope for a bright new beginning.

And to top it off this New Year's Eve will be even more special because if you look up and to the right of Sirius at midnight you'll see the brilliant king of the planets, Jupiter which will be at its highest since 1989. And if you look to the right of Jupiter you will see the ringed planet Saturn which is at its brightest since 1975, a quarter century ago. And because they'll be so incredibly high above the horizon at midnight it will be a perfect time to look at them through that new telescope or binoculars you got for Christmas. Indeed, experience the awe and beauty of the cosmos at midnight. Start 2001 right with cosmic light. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 


Star Gazer Minute

#00-52 M

12/25/2000 thru 12/31/2000

"The New Year's Eve Star and Planets"

 

Horkheimer: If you'd like to do something different this New Year's Eve, celebrate the cosmic way. Simply go outside at midnight, look due south and the brightest star in the heavens, Sirius, will be at its highest point above the horizon, shining like a dazzling beacon heralding the new year. Plus this year, an added attraction. If you look up to the right of this New Year's Eve star you will see the brilliant planet Jupiter which will be at its highest since 1989 and to its right, Saturn at its brightest in 25 years, just begging you to look at them through that new telescope or binoculars you got for Christmas. So start 2001 right with cosmic light. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only
Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer

 



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