STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Thursday 11/20/03 - 1100-1200 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

STAR GAZER

Episode # 03-48 / 1356th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 12/01/2003 through
Sunday 12/07/2003

"A Brilliant Evening Star For The Holidays!
And Catch Mercury Now"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and make a mental note that not only will we have a brilliant evening star for the holidays but it will also pair up with an exquisite crescent Moon on Christmas Night. Plus for the next two weeks you can see the elusive planet #1 out from the Sun at its best. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this weekend, Saturday and Sunday, December 6th and 7th, 45 minutes after Sunset, while it's still twilight, looking southwest where you'll see a dazzling object which is so bright you might mistake it for the landing light of an airplane. And as far back as we can go in recorded history whenever this object appeared after Sunset in early evening it was always called "The Evening Star". Plus for hundreds of years whenever it appeared close to Christmas it was mistakenly thought to be "The Christmas Star". But even though it has long been called "The Evening Star" or "The Christmas Star" it is in fact not a star at all but a planet; planet #2 out from the Sun, the planet named for the Roman goddess of love, 8,000 mile wide Venus, which is almost the same size as our planet Earth. And on Christmas night it will be even higher and even more brilliant than it is right now.

Plus for an added treat for the next two weeks you'll be able to see the very elusive first planet out from the Sun which pops in and out of evening and morning skies for very brief periods during the year, the fastest moving planet of them all, 3,000 mile wide Mercury; which many people call the "Pink Iron Planet" because it does indeed look pinkish to the naked eye and has a gigantic iron core larger than our own 2,000 mile wide Moon. In fact, science writer Neil Mcaleer who wrote "The Cosmic Mind Boggling Book" says that at recent world production rates for iron it would take 650 billion years to mine all the iron in Mercury's core. That's 43 times longer than the universe has existed! But you'll have to catch Mercury in the next two weeks because during the third week of December it will disappear below the horizon. You can watch it climb higher during the first week of December and on the 8th and 9th it will reach its very highest, after which it will slowly drop back down toward the horizon and sink out of sight.

But the real treat will happen on Christmas night, Thursday December 25th, 45 minutes after sunset when Venus, our holiday evening star will be right beside a young crescent Moon complete with earthshine, which will look like a full Moon nestled within the crescent, and will make just about the best cosmic Christmas gift you could ever hope for. I mean this will be absolutely spectacular. So look for the Pink Iron Planet for the next two weeks and on Christmas night take your family out to see an exquisite crescent Moon and the holiday star! Wow! I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#03-48 M

12/01/2003 thru 12/07/2003

"The Holiday Star And
Catch Mercury Now
"


Horkheimer: On Christmas night a crescent Moon will pair up with "The Evening Star" plus for the next two weeks you can see Mercury at its best. Look south west just after sunset this December and you'll see a dazzling object which for hundreds of years has been mistakenly called the "Evening Star" but a star it's not. It's the brightest planet of all 8,000 mile wide Venus. And on Christmas night it will pair with an exquisite crescent Moon in an image you'll never forget. Below Venus the next two weeks you can watch the pink iron planet 3,000 mile wide Mercury as it rises higher to its highest point on December 9th and then drops back toward the horizon; two planets just after sunset; and a Christmas night you won't forget. Keep Looking Up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer







STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Thursday 11/20/03 - 1100-1200 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



 

STAR GAZER

Episode #03-49 /1357th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 12/08/2003 through Sunday 12/14/2003

"3 Cosmic Seasons At A Glance In Mid December"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Even though mid December heralds the end of autumn and the beginning of winter nevertheless, in early evening mid December you can see 3 constellations each of which belongs to a different season: autumn, winter and summer. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for any night in mid December, any December of your life at 7 p.m., facing due north where if you don't have too much city lighting to wipe out your northern horizon you'll be able to see the North Star which is the star at the end of the handle of the Little Dipper. And directly above it, one of the most famous constellations of autumn, five stars which if we connect with imaginary lines trace out a slightly squashed out letter M. This is Cassiopeia named for an ancient queen of Ethiopia. And in mid December early evening she rides upside down in her celestial chair as a punishment for her ancient vanity.

Now as you may recall the constellations of any season are always those which are most prominent, that is the highest, before midnight. So since it is still autumn it is quite fitting that she should be prominent and very high in early evening although by midnight she will have descended the heavens and will be well down toward the northwest horizon. But at 7 o'clock mid December she says "Autumn is still here and I'm not ready to relinquish my prominent position yet", as have the 3 brightest stars of summer which make up the Summer Triangle, Altair in Aquila the Eagle, Vega in Lyra the Harp and Deneb in Cygnus the Swan. And it's easy to see at this time of year how Cygnus got its other name, the Northern Cross because every December in early evening this cross can be seen standing upright on the northwest horizon which early Christians saw as a fitting symbol in the month of Christmas. So some of summer's constellations have not yet disappeared in early evening mid December so you can catch them now before they do.

And that leaves us with our third cosmic season, one which will start during the 3rd week of December, winter. And since winter is just about to begin, if you look east at 7 p.m. you'll see winter's most famous constellation Orion the Hunter just risen. Three stars equally spaced in a row mark his belt, two stars mark his knees and two stars his shoulders. And Orion is indeed the herald of winter. In fact, in early evening December he almost looks defiant as he rises off the horizon with a club in one hand and a shield in the other almost saying to the constellations of autumn and summer, "Get out of my way because now it's my turn!" so there you have it three cosmic seasons at a glance at 7 p.m. in mid December. Winter's Orion about to take the stage in the east, Cassiopeia still riding high and proud above the North Star in very late autumn and the three stars of the Summer Triangle with the Northern Cross upright on the horizon bidding us all a fond farewell. Isn't stargazing fun? I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!


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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.



Star Gazer Minute

#03-49 M

12/08/2003 thru 12/14/2003

"3 Cosmic Seasons At A Glance In Mid December"


Horkheimer: Believe it or not in early evening mid December you can see three cosmic seasons at a glance. Face north and above the North Star and the Little Dipper you'll see autumn's famous constellation which looks like a squashed out letter M, Cassiopeia. In the northwest the three stars which make up the summer triangle with its constellations Aquila the Eagle, Lyra the Harp, and Cygnus the Swan are also visible. And if you look east you'll see that Orion the Hunter has just risen announcing that winter's just around the corner and that he will soon take center stage. So if you miss summer and autumn you can still see them in the heavens in early evening mid December. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Thursday 11/20/03 - 1100-1200 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 03-50 / 1358th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 12/15/2003 through Sunday 12/21/2003

"A Breathtaking Pairing Of the Evening Star
And The Moon On Christmas Night!
And This Year's Winter Solstice"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. And mark 2:04 a.m. Eastern Standard Time or your local equivalent, Monday December 22nd as the first moment of winter, the winter solstice. And also mark Christmas night, Thursday December 25th on your calendar as an evening you absolutely must see the pairing of the brilliant evening star with an exquisite crescent moon which will be so beautiful it will knock your socks off.

O.K., in order to understand what the winter solstice, the first moment of winter is, we should understand that the word "solstice" is Latin for sol ­ Sun and stice ­ stand still. So on the winter solstice the Sun from our Earth perspective appears to stand still. Because it is the one day of the year when the Sun rises at its farthest point south of east and sets at its farthest point south of west. Which was of great concern to our ancestors because they believed that all heavenly objects were gods and that if the Sun god was displeased it might just continue to keep rising and setting farther south until it eventually disappeared.

So the day of the winter solstice was met with great anticipation, a bit of anxiety and a lot of celebration because right after the solstice the Sun invariably started rising and setting a little bit farther north each day. Meaning that the world would not be plunged into eternal winter and that spring would once again eventually come. You see on the first day of spring the Sun rises and sets exactly due east and due west and thereafter it rises and sets just slightly north of east and west every single successive day until it reaches its northernmost rising and setting points on the summer solstice when the Sun once again appears to stand still after which it retraces its steps, rising and setting a little farther south of north each day until the winter solstice when once again the Sun appears to stand still. So the winter solstice is the day when the Sun reaches its southernmost rising and setting point along the horizon and in the northern hemisphere is the day of shortest daylight and longest night time.

So it's easy to see why our ancestors could be frightened because many believed that if the Sun continued its journey south the world would be plunged into eternal night. In fact winter solstice celebrations were so widespread in our western culture that the early church decided to move Christmas to the time of the solstice. And speaking of Christmas, if you go out Christmas night Thursday December 25th 45 minutes after sunset and look southwest you'll see the dazzling "Evening Star" paired with an exquisite young crescent Moon complete with earth shine which will look like a dark full Moon cradled within the crescent. And although many people may mistake this "Evening Star" for the "Christmas Star" it is not a star at all but the brightest planet we can see from Earth, 8,000 mile wide Venus. Please don't miss this spectacular pairing on Christmas night! Take your family outside after Christmas dinner and marvel at this beautiful gift from the stars! Happy holidays! And Keep Looking Up!


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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#03-50 M

12/15/2003 thru 12/21/2003

"A Wonderful Sight On Christmas Night"

Horkheimer: Mark Christmas night on your calendar as an evening you absolutely must see the pairing of the brilliant evening star with an exquisite crescent Moon. After Christmas dinner go outside Christmas night, Thursday December 25th, 45 minutes after Sunset, look southwest and you'll see the dazzling "Evening Star" paired with an exquisite young crescent Moon complete with earthshine which will look like a dark full Moon cradled within the crescent. And although many people may mistake this "Evening Star" for the "Christmas Star" it is not a star at all but the brightest planet we can see from Earth, 8,000 mile wide Venus. Don't miss this wonderful sight on Christmas night. Happy holidays! And Keep Looking Up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Thursday 11/20/03 - 1100-1200 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #03-51 / 1359th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 12/22/2003 through Sunday 12/28/2003

"Saturn at Its Closest, Brightest, Highest
And Best At Midnight New Year's Eve!"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. And as incredible as it sounds just by cosmic coincidence the most beautiful planet in the solar system will be at its closest, brightest, highest and best for viewing at the stroke of midnight December 31st New Year's Eve welcoming in the new year 2004. And all you have to do to find it at midnight New Year's Eve is simply look up.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for about an hour after sunset facing east where the brightest stars you'll see will be those of Orion the Hunter. Three evenly spaced stars mark his belt, two stars mark his shoulders and two stars his knees. And to find Saturn all you have to do is shoot an arrow from his knee star Rigel through his red shoulder star Betelgeuse and that arrow will land almost smack dab on Saturn. Nothing could be easier. Or if you like, look for the two brightest stars of Gemini the Twins, Castor and Pollux and Saturn will be smack dab between their legs. And to make absolutely sure you've found it just remember that Saturn will not only will be brighter than Castor and Pollux but even brighter than all the bright stars of Orion.

Now once you've found it in early evening if you go out every hour you will see that it will be higher each hour as will Gemini and Orion. And it will continue its climb upward higher and higher until at the stroke of midnight, New Year's Eve, it will be at its very highest and almost overhead welcoming in the New Year. In fact, on New Year's Eve Saturn will be at its best viewing in the 56 year time period from 1974 to 2030. And if you've got a small telescope it will absolutely knock your socks off because its rings are about as wide open as they can get which is one of the reasons it is so bright because its rings reflect so much sunlight. The other reason its at its best for viewing is because on December 31st it's officially at opposition which means that it's directly opposite the Earth as seen from the Sun which also means it's at its closest to Earth and closest always means brightest.

And if you think about it, if it's opposite the Sun as seen from Earth, then as the Sun sets in the west Saturn must rise in the east and then climb higher every hour until it reaches its highest at midnight and then descend hour after hour until it sets in the west just as the Sun rises in the east. Now if you don't have a telescope, find a friend who has one. Even a cheap department store telescope will do because you only have to use about 70 power to see Saturn's rings and the division between them named for the 17th century astronomer Cassini who discovered it. Plus you can even see its largest moon, 3,200 mile wide Titan, which is 1 1/2 times the size of our Moon. At any rate, even if you don't have a telescope Saturn will still be so bright and so incredibly high at midnight that you just have to go out to see it. I mean isn't it wonderful? The most beautiful planet of them all welcomes in the New Year. See it now because this won't happen again on New Year's Eve until the year 2680. Happy New Year! And Keep Looking Up!

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#03-51 M

12/22/2003 thru 12/28/2003

"Celebrate New Year's Eve
With Saturn At Its Best"

Horkheimer: Just by cosmic coincidence the most beautiful planet in the solar system will be at its closest, brightest, highest and best at the stroke of midnight New Year's Eve. To find it earlier face east where you'll see Orion. Shoot an arrow from his knee star Rigel through his shoulder star Betelgeuse and that arrow will land smack dab on Saturn; which will be just to the right of Castor and Pollux of the Gemini Twins. Then every hour it will be higher until at the stroke of midnight it will be at its very highest and almost overhead welcoming in the New Year. See it now because this won't happen again on New Year's Eve until the year 2680. Happy New Year! And Keep Looking Up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Thursday 11/20/03 - 1100-1200 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #03-52 / 1359th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 12/29/2003 through Sunday 1/04/2004

"Four Bright Planets Ring In The New Year"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. And believe me, 2004 gets off with a bang because four bright planets can be seen in early evening. So if you got a telescope for Christmas you'll have a lot to see before midnight. O.K., we've got our skies set up for one hour after sunset, the next two weeks, facing southwest where the brightest thing you'll see will be an object that is often mistakenly called "The Evening Star" but which is, in fact, the brightest planet of them all, the planet that comes closest to us, 8,000 mile wide Venus.

At the beginning of January it sets about 2 1/2 hours after sunset but by the end of the month it will set about 3 1/2 hours after sunset. And although it's brilliant and beautiful to just the naked eye, it will absolutely dazzle you through a pair of binoculars. And through a telescope you'll see that it looks like one of the phases of our own Moon because Venus does indeed go through phases. Next if you look up and to the left of Venus, almost due south, you'll see the planet that was all the rage in August, the planet that was closer to Earth than it had been in 60,000 years and one that is still bright enough to grab your attention although only 5% as bright as it was in August, our old friend 4,000 mile wide Mars, which through a small telescope still shows a few features.

But the planet that's going to get the most attention for the next three months is on the opposite side of the sky rising in the east. It is the second largest planet, 75,000 mile wide Saturn. And on New Year's Eve it was at its brightest and highest and almost overhead at midnight and closer to Earth than it will be again until December 2032. In fact it's at its best for viewing in a 56 year time period because its rings are almost wide open in addition to its being so close. So if you have a telescope you just have to see Saturn during the next three months because you'll have to wait a long time to see it as good as it is from now through march.

To find it, simply use the stars of Orion the hunter. Just shoot an arrow from his knee star Rigel through his shoulder star Betelgeuse and that arrow will land smack dab on Saturn. Or you can use the Moon to find it, because on Tuesday night January 6th an almost full Moon will be parked right alongside it. Lastly, if you go out around 11 p.m. and look due east you'll see the biggest planet of them all just risen over the horizon, 88,000 mile wide Jupiter, which through even the smallest telescope is a fascinating sight because you can watch its four largest moons, which look like pinpoints of light, change place every night, shuttling back and forth as they orbit Jupiter. So there you have it four planets ring in the New Year! Are we getting off to a good start or what? I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#03-52 M

12/29/2003 thru 1/04/2004

"Four Bright Planets Ring In The New Year"

Horkheimer: Four bright planets ring in the New Year, so if you got a telescope for Christmas you've got a lot to see. An hour after sunset look southwest and you'll see 8,000 mile wide Venus the brightest planet of them all which looks like a gibbous Moon in a telescope. Up to its left, 4,000 mile wide Mars which still shows a few features. Face east and 75,000 mile wide Saturn will knock your socks off because it is closer to Earth than it will be until 2032 and is at its brightest and best for viewing through March. At 11 p.m. 88,000 mile wide Jupiter has just risen and you can watch its four largest moons shuttle back and forth in orbit. Happy New Year! And Keep Looking Up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


[SmilinJack]Return to the [STAR GAZER Main Page]