STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half Hour Feed STAH 1006
Wednesday Nov. 17, 1230-1300/SD06
Includes episodes 1049, 1050, 1051, 1052

Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 10-49 / 1722nd Show
To Be Aired : Monday 12/6/2010 through
Sunday 12/12/2010

"Be Sure To Catch What Could Be The Best Meteor Shower Of The Year Next Week"

Dean: Hey there star gazers. I'm Dean Regas from the Cincinnati Observatory and I'll be your guest host this month on Star Gazer. Late Monday evening December 13th through dawn Tuesday morning the 14th we will be treated to the only known asteroid shower. Officially known as the Geminid meteor shower, it is in reality an asteroid shower because it is the only meteor shower, which comes from asteroid debris and not comet debris.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for next Monday evening December 13th about 9 p.m. your local time facing east where you'll see some of the brightest stars of winter; the seven bright stars of Orion, specially his red shoulder star, Betelgeuse and the bright bluish star which marks his knee, Rigel. Below Orion and dazzling brighter than any other star in the sky, you'll easily find Sirius, the brightest star in Orion's hunting companion, Canis Major. Sirius will probably be twinkling and flashing like a diamond in a jeweler's window. To Sirius' left you'll find Procyon, which with Sirius and Orion's bright red star, Betelgeuse, make a perfect triangle in the eastern sky.

Up to Procyon's left you'll see Castor and Pollux the two brightest stars of Gemini the twins for which this Geminid meteor/ asteroid shower is named because all the meteors will appear to originate from the constellation Gemini. Turn around and look west and the first quarter moon will be only about 7 degrees away from the bright king of the planets Jupiter. These two bright lights will give you the signal to start watching for the Geminids in earnest when they set after midnight.

Viewing for the Geminids is sometimes good in early evening so it's worth looking before midnight as well. And as always you should be as far away from city lights as possible. You may see a few dozen meteors per hour. And by meteors I mean streaks of light flashing across the sky, which most people commonly call shooting stars. Now a meteor is nothing more than a tiny speck of space debris, which slams into our Earth's atmosphere so fast that its friction heats up the gasses in our Earth's atmosphere and causes them to glow like the gasses in a neon tube. What we see is a brief streak of light as the speck of space debris burns up and plunges to its fiery death. Typically when you see a meteor it is 50 to 80 miles away.

Now a few times every year our Earth regularly plows into massive concentrations of space debris which we call meteor streams, but which are really great rivers of comet dust. You see comets orbit our sun just like the planets and every time a comet comes close to our sun it sheds some of its material. Eventually this comet debris gets spread all along its orbit and whenever our Earth plows into one of these debris rivers we experience a meteor shower. The best one usually occurs in August and is called the Perseid meteor shower. But the second best is often December's Geminid meteor shower, which, as I mentioned earlier, differs from all the others because its debris comes from an asteroid called 3200 Phaethon, not a comet!

Sky watchers first noticed the Geminids in the mid-1800's, but for more than a century the shower's parent comet was unknown. Then, in 1983, NASA's infrared astronomy satellite spotted a new asteroid: 3200 Phaethon. Astronomers noticed that Phaethon and the Geminid meteoroid stream follow nearly identical orbits. Now Phaethon doesn't produce a tail any more, which means there are no jets of vaporizing debris, so whatever produced the Geminid meteoroids probably happened long ago. They move around the Sun in an elliptical path that stretches from inside the orbit of Mercury outward to the asteroid belt and take one and a half-years for each trip. Every year in mid-December when the Geminid meteor shower is active, Earth passes quite close to Phaethon's orbit, which makes Phaethon a potentially hazardous near-Earth asteroid. It might hit us one day, but I'm not worried. Gemini will slowly descend into the west as the night goes by, but to fully enjoy this wonderful event remember to just keep looking up.

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#10-49 M

12/6/2010 thru 12/12/2010

"Be Sure To Catch What Could Be The Best Meteor Shower Of The Year Next Week"

Dean: From late Monday night Dec. 13 through dawn Tuesday the 14th we'll be treated to the annual Geminid meteor/ asteroid shower. If you're far from city lights you may see a few dozen per hour. Face east Monday evening and you'll see Orion and the two brightest stars of Gemini. Turn and face southwest and you'll see a first quarter Moon and Jupiter nearby. When they set around midnight look up and you may see one of the best meteor showers of the year. Unlike all other meteor showers, which occur whenever our Earth rides into space rivers of comet debris the Geminid meteor shower occurs every December when we ride into a river of asteroid debris. So happy asteroid shower and keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half Hour Feed STAH 1006
Wednesday Nov. 17, 1230-1300/SD06
Includes episodes 1049, 1050, 1051, 1052


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode #10-50 /1723th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 12/13/2010 through Sunday 12/19/2010

"Get Ready For Next Week's
Total Eclipse Of the Moon,
You Won't See Another One For Four Years"


DEAN: Hey there star gazers. I'm Dean Regas from the Cincinnati Observatory and I'll be your guest host this month on Star Gazer. On Tuesday morning, December 21st, the full Moon will pass through the shadow of the Earth and produce a total eclipse of the Moon. The next total lunar eclipse that we can see from all of North America won't happen until tax day, April 15, 2014. This lunar eclipse will be on the same day as this year's winter solstice. During totality the Moon will be above Orion the hunter and surrounded by the brightest stars of winter. Let me show you.

O.K., let's imagine that we're out in space looking at our Moon, Earth and Sun. Now moonlight is really light from the Sun reflected off the Moon and back to our Earth. One half of the Moon is lit up by the Sun at all times, although the only time we see the half of the Moon that is completely lit up is when we have a full Moon which occurs every month whenever the Moon is directly opposite the Sun as seen from Earth. Now usually when we have a full Moon the Moon is either above or below the plane of our Earth's orbit and passes above or below the shadow. Last month the Moon passed above the Earth's shadow and passed directly between the Earth's shadow and the Pleiades but you couldn't see either of them. You'll just have to take my word for it.

Now occasionally the full Moon will glide directly into the plane of our Earth's orbit and will pass directly through our Earth's shadow, which will block most of the Sun's light from reaching it. In other words our Earth's shadow will eclipse the light of the Sun, which is why we call such an event an eclipse. But during a total lunar eclipse the Moon never completely disappears and always turns some unpredictable shade of reddish orange. And that's because the red rays of sunlight are bent by our Earth's atmosphere into our Earth's shadow, filling it with a faint reddish orange light. So during a total lunar eclipse the reddish orange Moon color you see is actually red light from all the sunrises and sunsets around the world being refracted, that is bent, into our Earth's shadow and onto the Moon and then reflected back to Earth again.

Now if we look closely at our Earth's shadow cone we would see that there are two distinct parts to it. A pale outer shadow called the penumbra and a smaller inner, dark shadow called the umbra. When the Moon is in the penumbra the eclipse effect is not very noticeable. So I suggest you start watching when the Moon begins to enter the umbra at 1:32 a.m. eastern time or your local equivalent. As time passes, the umbra, our Earth's circular shadow, will slowly creep across the Moon and gradually darken it and cause it to change color. But what color the Moon will turn no one can predict, and that's what makes it so much fun. Will it turn bright orange, or blood red? Only the shadow knows.

The Moon will be within the umbra and totally eclipsed for an hour and 13 minutes from 2:40 a.m. until 3:53 a.m. eastern time. From 3:53 a.m. to 6:01 a.m. the Moon will slowly slide out of the umbra and then the penumbra and then return to nearly full Moon brilliance. While it is still in the penumbra there will be very little difference from a regular full Moon.

But this year as a bonus during totality you'll see the Moon in the middle of the Winter Hexagon. The closest bright star to the red Moon will be the red star Betelgeuse in Orion. Not much farther away you'll find the red star Aldebaran the menacing eye of Taurus the bull, the constellation that is hosting this lunar eclipse. Up to the right of the Moon is Capella in Auriga the charioteer and nearly overhead is the pair of stars named for the twins of Gemini, Castor and Pollux. Off to the left of the Moon is Procyon. At the darkest part of the eclipse you might notice that the Moon is in the middle of the Milky Way but there is no guarantee that you'll see it. Then, well down to the left of the Moon will be the brightest star in the night sky ,the dog star Sirius and closing the Winter Hexagon, Rigel in Orion. So pray for clear skies Tuesday morning, the 21st, when the Moon turns red. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#10-50 M

12/13/2010 thru 12/19/2010

"Get Ready For Next Week's
Total Eclipse Of the Moon,
You Won't See Another One For Four Years"

Dean: On Tuesday December 21st the last total lunar eclipse for four years will occur. A total lunar eclipse occurs whenever a full Moon glides directly into our Earth's shadow which blocks most of the Sun's light from reaching it because moonlight is nothing more than reflected sunlight. There is however always some red sunlight in the shadow which makes the Moon turn an unpredictable shade of reddish orange during totality which will last from 2:40 a.m. to 3:54 a.m Eastern time or your equivalent. During totality the bright stars of winter will surround the Moon; Orion's Betelgeuse, Taurus' Aldebaran, Sun-like Capella, the twins Castor and Pollux, and Orion's hunting dog stars Procyon and Sirius. Check our website for more info. Keep looking up!


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half Hour Feed STAH 1006
Wednesday Nov. 17, 1230-1300/SD06
Includes episodes 1049, 1050, 1051, 1052


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode # 10-51 / 1724th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 12/20/2010 through Sunday 12/26/2010

"Follow The Moon Past Planets And Stars In The Morning Sky"


DEAN: Hey there star gazers. I'm Dean Regas from the Cincinnati Observatory and I'll be your guest host this month on Star Gazer. Next week the waning crescent Moon will lead you down a trail past several bright stars and three planets just before dawn. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for an hour before sunrise on Tuesday Dec. 28th, facing southeast. Almost halfway up the sky you'll have no trouble spotting a last quarter Moon. About 13 degrees down to its left you'll see the bright blue star Spica in the constellation Virgo the virgin. About ten degrees to the Moon's left you will find the ringed planet Saturn which is now showing us more of its ring system after presenting them nearly edge on to us last fall. Saturn's rings will continue to open for the next several years. If you were lucky enough to get a new telescope for Christmas here's a good chance to put it to use. Make sketches or if you can, take pictures every month of what Saturn looks like in your telescope. Keep them all together and watch Saturn change. You'll quickly notice that Saturn will not stay in the same place in the morning sky.

The next morning, Wednesday Dec. 29th, same time, same direction the Moon will have moved to about 4 degrees below Spica. The next morning Thursday Dec. 30 an even skinnier Moon will be just to the right of a pair of stars with funny sounding names, Zubenelgenubi and Zubeneschamali. In a line to the left of the Moon you'll see two stars in Libra that have claws. But isn't Libra a set of scales? What's up with this claw bit?

Well way, way back the Greeks used these two stars to mark the ends of the claws of Scorpius before there even was a Libra. The Romans inserted a set of scales here and rearranged the stars of Scorpius to make room. There's nothing sacred or permanent about constellation patterns. Every culture in history has had their own sets of star figures and stories about them. Why not make up some of your own? Hey look there's Dean's dinosaur!

The next morning Friday Dec. 31st, New Year's Eve, a very skinny Moon will be about 7 degrees down to the right of that brilliant light in the morning sky, Venus. Venus is still incredibly bright in the morning sky but will be getting lower each day. The next morning, New Year's Day, if you're still up after ringing in 2011, a super skinny 27 day old Moon will be just 3 1/2 degrees above the giant red heart star of Scorpius, Antares. The contrast between these two is nothing short of amazing.

The Moon is a small, 2,000 mile wide, rocky body reflecting the light of our Sun. It is by far the brightest thing you'll see in the sky, but only because it is so close, only 236,000 miles away. Its light takes 1 and one quarter seconds to get here, while the light from Antares takes about 550 years to reach us. Antares is a red supergiant star. Some educated estimates put its width at over 700 times the diameter of our Sun. Although it's cooler than our sun Antares is at least 10,000 times brighter and perhaps much more.

Another reason to take note of Antares is that it's a very massive and potentially unstable star and it's expected that Antares will explode as a supernova some day or night. It may have already done so since the light of the supernova would take 550 years to reach us. and we just don't know about it yet, but probably not. The last day of our tour, January 2nd, has the Moon, even skinnier, just down and to the right of one of the most difficult planets to find, Mercury. Mercury will be almost at its highest, which is never very high even at best. You'll have about a week to find pinkish Mercury before it will race back into the glare of the rising Sun.

Let's go over that one more time: Dec. 28th, the Moon, Venus, Saturn and Spica; Dec. 29th, the Moon just below Spica; Dec. 30th, the Moon by Zubenelgenubi and Zubeneschamali; Dec. 31st, the Moon below Venus; Jan 1st the Moon just above Antares; and finally on Jan. 2nd, an extremely skinny, waning crescent Moon pointing the way to elusive Mercury. Follow the bouncing Moon and keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#10-51 M

12/20/2010 thru 12/26/2010

"Follow The Moon Past Planets And Stars In The Morning Sky"


DEAN: Next week follow the crescent Moon past several bright stars and three planets just before dawn. Let me show you. O.K., we're set up for an hour before sunrise on Tuesday Dec. 28th, facing southeast. Look for the last quarter Moon and about 13 degrees down to its left you'll see the bright star Spica. About ten degrees to the Moon's left you will find the ringed planet Saturn. The next morning, Wednesday Dec. 29th, same time, same direction the Moon will have moved below Spica. Friday Dec. 31st, New Year's Eve, a very skinny Moon will be down to the right of brilliant Venus. The next morning, New Year's Day, a super skinny 27 day old Moon will be just above the giant red star, Antares. The last day of our tour January 2nd, has the Moon, even skinnier, just down to the right of elusive Mercury. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half Hour Feed STAH 1006
Wednesday Nov. 17, 1230-1300/SD06
Includes episodes 1049, 1050, 1051, 1052


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode # 10-52 / 1725th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 12/27/2010 through Sunday 1/02/2011

"Third Time Is The Charm For Jupiter And Uranus"

Dean: Hey there star gazers. I'm Dean Regas from the Cincinnati Observatory and I'll be your guest host this month on Star Gazer. Jupiter and Uranus have been hanging out together in the sky for the past six months and they had super close encounters in June and September and will have one more Tuesday Jan. 4. The reason this is a big deal is that Jupiter is easy to find in the sky while Uranus is not. But when they're close together, usually every 13 to 14 years, you have an unusual opportunity to use Jupiter to help you find the dim 7th planet Uranus. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for Monday, January 3rd, about an hour after sunset facing southwest and if you look about half way up from the horizon you'll see a very bright light in the evening sky. It's Jupiter the king of the planets and if you have a pair of binoculars use them to take a look at Jupiter and its family of moons. 7 x 50 binoculars will give you a view something like this. At first you'll probably be able to see only Jupiter but give it a few minutes and you should be able to see some very tiny points of light on either side of Jupiter. Jupiter will be about 2000 times brighter than these points of light, which are four of the many moons of Jupiter. They were first seen by Galileo in 1610 with his small homemade telescope.

Now on Monday night there will be something extra. The dim blue-green planet Uranus will be visible up to the right of Jupiter. How far? It'll be about the width of our Earth's Moon away. You can see Uranus with the naked eye in a dark sky, but not many people have actually done it. Those four moons of Jupiter are about the same brightness as Uranus so using binoculars will make it much easier. Take your time and you'll find Uranus near Jupiter if you have patience and clear skies. Next week is special because Jupiter and Uranus will be very close for several days and the Moon won't interfere until later in the week.

Now Jupiter and Uranus are both much farther from the Sun than our Earth and orbit very slowly in comparison to the Earth. Jupiter takes about 12 Earth years for one circuit of the sun while Uranus takes 84 Earth years to do the same. Jupiter will catch up with Uranus every 13 to 14 years and then they'll be in conjunction. Jupiter and Uranus were in conjunction on June 8th, Sept. 22 and then on Jan. 4th we'll see the last close-up of this triple conjunction.

A triple conjunction means that Jupiter appears to pass Uranus, then appears to go on a path that causes it to loop backwards past Uranus for a second time. That backward motion (called "retrograde motion") soon comes to an end and Jupiter resumes its normal eastward path, passing Uranus a third and final time. The last triple conjunction was in 1983 and the next will be in 2037-38. They don't happen very often. And this was a real puzzle for our ancestors to explain.

The reason this happens is that it only looks like they are slowing down and then reversing as the Earth passes them on the inside track, they don't really do it. If you pass a car on the expressway is it really going backwards or does it only look like its backing up? This year Jupiter and Uranus were both at opposition on September 21st and because of them both being at opposition at nearly the same time there were three conjunctions of Uranus and Jupiter this time around. They were in conjunction on June 8th, Sept. 22 and the last one will be, you guessed it, next week on Tuesday Jan. 4th. So get out your binoculars or small telescope next week and take a look at the 7th planet Uranus and the 5th planet Jupiter with its four moons, Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto.

These moons are sometimes called the Galilean moons after Galileo Galilei who discovered them with his homemade telescope. In fact the first night he used his telescope to see them was Jan. 7, 1610. So why not have your own celebration next Friday Jan. 7th, 401 years later? Go outside after sunset and look at Jupiter and Uranus in the southwest with your naked eye or binoculars and if you have one, use your small telescope and while you're out there remember Galileo Galilei, the mathematician and inventor from Pisa who started it all. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#10-52 M

12/27/2010 thru 1/02/2011

"Third Time Is The Charm For Jupiter And Uranus"

DEAN: Jupiter and Uranus have been hanging out together in the sky for the past six months and you have an unusual opportunity to let Jupiter help you find the dim 7th planet Uranus. Let me show you. O.K., we've got our skies set up for Monday, January 3rd, about an hour after sunset facing southwest and if you look about half way up from the horizon you'll see a very bright light in the evening sky. It's Jupiter the king of the planets but on Monday night there will be something extra. The dim blue-green planet Uranus will be visible up to the right of Jupiter. You can see Uranus with the naked eye in a dark sky, but not many people have actually done it. They will be close together every night next week so use Jupiter to find the dim 7th planet Uranus and keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


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