STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

12/20/2000 9:30 - 10:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


STAR GAZER

Episode # 01-01 / 1204th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 1/1/2001 through Sunday 1/07/2001

"January Is

'How To Use Your New Telescope' Month"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. A couple of months ago after talking with our new underwriters, Meade Telescopes, a curious thought struck me. You see, there are more telescopes purchased in December for gift giving than at any other time of the year. But because many people who receive these gifts are brand new to star and planet gazing, every January planetariums and astronomy clubs everywhere get thousands of calls from people asking for help in using their new telescopes. So all of us at "Star Gazer" are asking astronomy clubs, planetariums and museums all across the country to designate this and every January "How To Use Your Telescope" month. So after this show use your telephone directory or log on to our website to find the planetarium, astronomy club or museum nearest you and give them a call and ask them if it's all right to bring your telescope to their January meeting so that someone can show you how to really get the most out of it. And this month couldn't be better for using your new scope. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for an hour after sunset the next couple of weeks facing west where you'll see the brightest planet in the sky, 8,000 mile wide Venus, which through your telescope will look like a tiny first quarter moon. Then if you look east you'll see the king of the planets, 88,000 mile wide Jupiter which at about 100 power will look something like this. Those tiny dots are moons. Plus if you look just above Jupiter you'll see the 75,000 mile wide ringed planet Saturn which at 100 power will blow you away. And to its left, The Pleiades, The Seven Sisters, which at only 20 power will also knock your socks off. And if you look below Jupiter and Saturn just above the horizon you will see the 3 stars which mark the Belt of Orion the Hunter and to the right of those 3 stars, 3 dimmer stars marking his sword. And if you look at that so-called middle star at low power you'll see that it's not a star at all, but a great cloud of gas where new stars are actually being born and with only 100 power you will actually be able to see 4 very young stars called The Trapezium embedded in it. And if that's not enough, all month long, night after night you'll be able to watch the ever changing face of our nearest neighbor, our 2,000 mile wide moon.

So this January is absolutely a perfect time to learn how to use your telescope to its fullest advantage. Simply contact your nearest astronomy club, planetarium or museum and ask for help because I don't know many star gazers who don't love to share their passion for the wonders of the sky, plus you'll probably make some new friends. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#01-01 M

1/01/2001 thru 1/07/2001

January Is "How To Use Your Telescope Month"

 

Horkheimer: Because more people get telescopes in December than any time of the year we've decided to ask astronomy clubs, planetariums and museums everywhere to make January "How To Use Your Telescope Month" to encourage new owners to bring their scopes to their January meetings and learn how to use them. And this January is super because incredible Venus in the west looks like a tiny 1st quarter moon and in the east Jupiter and Saturn will blow you away. The Seven Sisters at low power are magnificent and the great Orion Nebula reveals 4 newly born stars in the shape of a baseball diamond. So log onto our website to find the astronomy club, planetarium or museum nearest you. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer








STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

12/20/2000 9:30 - 10:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov




Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #01-02 /1205th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 1/08/2001 through Sunday 1/14/2001

"Which Season Is The Longest? And Which Is The Shortest? Spring, Summer, Autumn Or Winter"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and I'll just bet that most of you are under the impression that the 4 seasons are equal in length, when in fact none of them are the same number of days and nights long. So which season is the longest and which is the shortest? Well I'll bet most school children would say that summer is the shortest because it seems to just fly by. But is that true or is it simply a matter of human perception? Let's find out.

O.K. now everyone knows that our earth makes one trip around the sun once a year. In fact, astronomically speaking that's exactly what a year is ... the amount of time it takes for any planet to make one trip around the sun, and one earth trip is 365 1/4 earth days long. Now according to Kepler's Laws of Motion the closer a planet is to the sun the faster it will travel ... the farther it is from the sun the slower it will travel. So, because our earth's orbit is not a perfect circle, but is a slightly stretched out circle called an ellipse and since our sun is not at the center of this ellipse our earth actually varies its distance from the sun during the year. When it's closest to the sun it travels faster and when it's farthest it travels slower. Now believe it or not our earth is actually closest to the sun in January and farthest in July. So our earth actually travels faster when it's winter in the northern hemisphere and slower during the summer.Let me show you.

O.K., on the first day of spring our earth is traveling at a speed of 66,900 miles per hour and is moving farther from the sun and slowing down and thus takes 93 days to go from the first day of spring to the first to the first day of summer, so spring is 93 days long. Then the earth continues to slow down until it is at its farthest point from the sun the first week of July when it reaches its slowest speed of 65,500 miles per hour. Thereafter, because it's starting to move back closer to the sun it slowly starts to speed up.

Even so it takes 94 days for our earth to travel from the first day of summer to the first day of fall, which makes summer 94 days long. Then as it moves closer and closer to the sun it picks up more speed day by day so that it takes only 90 days to travel from the first day of fall to the first day of winter. Thus fall is 90 days long. And our earth continues to speed up until it reaches its closest point to the sun the first week of January, zipping along at 67,600 miles per hour which is 2,200 miles per hour faster than its speed in July.

In fact, it takes only 89 days for our earth to go from the first day of winter to the first day of spring. So even though summer feels like the shortest season to any school kid, winter is actually 5 days shorter and is the shortest season of the year for the northern hemisphere. And summer is the longest. But if you live south of the equator, well, that's another story, things would be just the reverse. So, bundle up and Happy 'Shortest Season of the Year'. I'm Jack Horkheimer. Keep Looking Up!

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.



Star Gazer Minute

#01-02 M

1/8/2001 thru 1/14/2001

"Which Season Is The Longest and

Which Is The Shortest?"

 

Horkheimer: Have you ever wondered which season is the longest or shortest? Well, I'll bet most school kids would say summer is the shortest because it just flies by. But is that simply a matter of human perception? You see, our earth's orbit is not a perfect circle, but is an ellipse so our earth actually varies its distance from the sun during the year. When it's closer to the sun it travels faster, when its farther away it travels slower. And believe it or not the earth is closer in winter and travels over 2,200 miles per hour faster than it does in summer .. so fast in fact that winter, which is 89 days long, is 5 days shorter than summer, which is 94 days long. For the northern hemisphere. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.



Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

12/20/2000 9:30 - 10:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)

Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 01-03 / 1206th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 1/15/2001 through Sunday 1/21/2001

"The Moon Pays A Visit To
The Two Inner Planets
And How To Watch It"
 

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and next week you have a wonderful opportunity to watch our moon visit the two inner planets. But what are the inner planets anyway? Well, as almost everyone knows, there are 9 planets and as even television sitcoms will tell you, our earth is the 3rd rock, or planet from the sun. Any planet beyond our earth is called an outer planet and the outer planets in their order are Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and Pluto. So any planets that are closer to the sun than earth must be called inner planets, right? Right! Number 2 is Venus and Number 1, Mercury.

Now if we could look down from space on planets #1, 2 and 3 we could notice that the closer a planet is to the sun the faster it moves in its orbit. You see, while it takes our earth 365 1/4 days to make one trip around the sun, it takes Venus only 224 days to make one trip. But Mercury is so close to the sun it zips around it once every 88 earth days. And because the inner planets are literally closer to the sun than we are, they visually never get very far away from the sun as seen from earth. Now whenever Venus is available for viewing it can be seen at the most only up to 4 hours after sunset or 4 hours before sunrise. Mercury on the other hand can rarely be seen more than an hour after sunset or before sunrise. And Mercury, because it is so fast, appears then disappears in and out of earth's skies several times a year. And next week it makes one of those semi-rare appearances.

So to find it simply go outside any clear night next week, have a clear flat horizon, look west/southwest and about 3 fists up from the horizon you should see a brightish, pinkish light and that is tiny 3,000 mile wide Mercury. You may see as very slender sliver of a crescent moon just below it on January 25th. And on February 26th, a slightly larger crescent, complete with earthshine will be up and to Mercury's left. Plus almost half way up the sky from the horizon to the zenith you won't be able to miss the second planet, 8,000 mile wide Venus because it will out dazzle everything else in the sky. On Saturday the 27th an even fatter crescent moon, complete with earthshine will be almost directly below Venus in a sky picture that no photograph can ever do justice. And Sunday night will be equally spectacular when an even slightly fatter moon will be just to the left if the planet named for the Roman goddess of love. Once again, Thursday the 25th, Friday the 26th, Saturday the 27th and Ta Da! Sunday the 28th, a spectacular pairing. Wow! What a wonderful time for inner planet gazing providing you go outer. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#01-03 M

1/15/2001 thru 1/21/2001

"The Moon Visits The Two Inner Planets"

 

Horkheimer: We all Know there are 9 plants. The 6 beyond earth are called the outer planets and the 2 closer to the sun are called the inner planets. And next week our moon will visit planet #1 and 2. Look west southwest just after sunset on the 25th and it will be just under tiny 3,000 mile wide Mercury and on the 26th, just past it. On the 27th it will approach the 2nd inner planet, 8,000 mile wide Venus and on the 28th will absolutely knock your socks off in one of the best moon/planet pairings of the year. Once again: the 25th below Mercury, the 26th above it, the 27th approaching Venus and on the 28th a cosmic feast for the eyes! I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

12/20/2000 9:30 - 10:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #01-04 /1207th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 1/22/2001 through Sunday 1/28/2001

"The Ground Hog Day Moon
Visits 2 Planets and
A Venus Reminder"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and I'd like to remind you that this Sunday evening, the 28th, about an hour after sunset if you look west southwest you will see an exquisite pairing of a bright crescent moon complete with the old moon in the new moon's arms, and the most dazzling planet of the year, our nearest neighbor planet Venus. Now this is the kind of pairing that you have to see to appreciate because it's impossible to ever really see it in even the best photographs. In fact, it's the kind of pairing that has inspired artists throughout the millennia and almost all cultures seem to have recorded such pairings. Of course our ancestors thought these two objects were celestial divinities and thus their beauty was mixed with a kind of mysticism, but today scientific knowledge of them makes them even more wonderful.

So as you look up this Sunday evening remind yourself that we now know that our moon is our nearest celestial neighbor, only 247,000 miles away this Sunday and that it is very small, a 2,000 mile wide world. We also know that Venus is a world the same size as our own planet earth, 8,000 miles wide and that it is far beyond our moon, being 56 million miles away this Sunday. So as you gaze up at the two this Sunday night keep in mind that we are privileged to know what our ancestors couldn't even suspect. We have the wonder of science to add to the incredible beauty of nature.

And now let's take a look at two other distant worlds which have been visually together in the night sky for some time and but will soon be separating and will not come together again for 20 years. O.K., we've got our skies set up for Ground Hog Day, early evening, a couple of hours after sunset and if you look due south you will see the Ground Hog Day moon which is just one day past 1st quarter and which we call a gibbous moon. In fact, whenever you see a moon that is slightly rounded and bigger than 1st quarter or last quarter we call that a gibbous moon. Gibbous comes from a word which means humped because the moon does look slightly humped. The gibbous moons just after 1st quarter to full moon are called waxing gibbous, the gibbous moons after full moon to last quarter are called waning gibbous.

At any rate, this Ground Hog Day night a waxing slightly gibbous moon will be parked right along see 88,000 mile wide Jupiter and not too far away from nearby 75,000 mile wide Saturn, the two biggest planets of our solar system. And I suggest if you have a pair of binoculars you start looking at the two of them now because by the end of February they will have separated enough so that they will not be visible in the same field of view in a pair of binoculars. In fact we won't see them this close again for 20 more years. And while you're looking up at them remind yourself that while our moon on Ground Hog Day will be 230,000 miles away, Jupiter will be 435 million miles away and Saturn 825 million miles away. Don't miss this Ground Hog Day and don't miss this Sunday. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#01-04 M

1/22/2001 thru 1/28/2001

"Venus and The Ground Hog Day Moon"

 

Horkheimer: This Sunday just after sunset you will see an exquisite pairing of a crescent moon and our nearest neighbor Venus, the kind of pairing that has inspired artists throughout the millennia. And if the ground hog looks south Ground Hog Day night he'll see a just past 1st quarter gibbous moon paired with the planet Jupiter. Gibbous means humped because the moon does indeed look slightly humped. Gibbous moons from 1st quarter to full moon are called waxing gibbous and gibbous moons after full moon to last quarter are called waning gibbous. Don't miss the Ground Hog Day Moon and Jupiter and the crescent moon and Venus this Sunday. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only
Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer

 


 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

12/20/2000 9:30 - 10:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #01-05 /1208th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 1/29/2001 through Sunday 2/04/2001

"The Month Of The Incredible UFO Planet!"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and yes indeed, some time, some where this month you or a friend will be absolutely sure you have spotted a UFO because it happens every time one particular planet reaches its brightest in early evening skies. Let me show you: O.K., we've got our skies set up for just after it gets dark out, facing southwest this week and next and if it's clear out and you're driving home from work you will see a brilliant light that always takes people's breath away. And although I've talked about it for the past few months, this month is the month of this planet because this February, the most brilliant of the planets, Venus reaches its very brightest and will absolutely take your breath away. Indeed as the month progresses Venus will rapidly approach us and thus will become even brighter, reaching its very brightest February 21st. So what do we know about this planet?

Well for one it's almost exactly the same size as our planet Earth, 8,000 miles wide. So one might assume that if we looked back at our earth from Venus our earth would look just as bright. But nothing could be farther from the truth. In fact our earth would look much dimmer from Venus even at its brightest. You see, because Venus is completely covered by a thick blanket of clouds, these clouds reflect sunlight much more than our earth's water and land masses. In fact our earth reflects only 37% of the sunlight that reaches it. Venus on the other hand reflects 65% of the sunlight reaching it. And because Venus comes closer to us than any other planet, the combination of its reflective cloud cover and closeness makes Venus dazzle like a brilliant cosmic mirror.

Now from space we see that Venus is about 55 million miles away from us this week but is rapidly approaching us so that by the night of its greatest brilliancy on February 21st it will be only 40 million miles away. And if you have a small telescope you will notice something wonderful happen as Venus approaches us. During the last week of January, through a small telescope it looked like a tiny 1st quarter moon, but by February 21st when it is much closer it will look much, much bigger, but will also look like a slender crescent moon. Now at the beginning of this month Venus is visible for about 4 hours after sunset it is setting. But by the end of this month it will set 3 hours after sunset. So start your Venus watching now.

Indeed, Venus is moving so fast towards Earth, and towards the glare of the sun as seen from earth that during the first 2 weeks of March Venus will rapidly descend. And by the 3rd week of March it will become lost in the glare of twilight. And then, on March 30th it will pass directly between earth and the sun and will reemerge as a morning planet in April. And even though it will be visible in pre-dawn skies for most of the year it will not achieve its spectacular brilliance and height what we are now witnessing. So see it this month ... the month of Venus. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#01-05 M

1/29/2001 thru 2/4/2001

"The Month Of The Incredible UFO Planet"

 

Horkheimer: Some where, some time this month you or a friend will be absolutely sure you've spotted a UFO because it happens every time Venus reaches its greatest brilliancy. Look southwest after sunset and although it's absolutely dazzling this week because it's only 55 million miles away, it will be even brighter in 3 weeks on its night of greatest brilliancy when it will be 15 million miles closer. Venus and earth are the same size, 8,000 miles wide, but because Venus is completely covered by bright clouds it reflects 65% of the sunlight reaching it whereas earth reflects only 37%. This combination of Venus' high reflectivity and closeness will make Venus dazzle like a UFO. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only
Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer

 



[SmilinJack]Return to the [STAR GAZER Main Page]