STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Reel # 612 One-hour feed
Wednesday 12/20/06 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0701, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705

 


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

 

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 07-01 / 1517th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 1/01/2007 through
Sunday 1/07/2007

"Use The Moon To Find The Ringed Planet
And The Heart Of Leo The Lion"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and Happy New Year! And to start the New Year right we have a special sky show for you this weekend because this Friday, Saturday and Sunday you will be able to use the Moon to find the most beautiful ringed planet in our solar system and the magnificent blue white star which marks the heart of Leo the Lion. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Friday 10 p.m. your local time facing east where the brightest thing you'll see will be a just after full gibbous Moon. And in case you've forgotten what a gibbous Moon is it comes from the word humped and is the name given to the hump-shaped Moon on the nights after first quarter until just before full plus the nights after full until last quarter, which gives us a monthly sequence of waxing crescent Moon, waxing means growing bigger each night, then first quarter Moon and then waxing gibbous Moon which means a growing hump-shaped Moon until full Moon. Then after full Moon to last quarter Moon we have a waning gibbous Moon, which means a shrinking hump-shaped Moon. Then finally we have waning or shrinking crescents. So the Moon you'll be seeing this Friday January 5th will be a waning gibbous Moon because it is shrinking each night and on its way to become last quarter Moon next week.

And this Friday if you look directly below the waning hump-shaped gibbous Moon you'll see planet #6 out from the sun, my favorite planet of them all, 75,000 mile wide ringed Saturn. And even the cheapest telescope at 50 power will show you its rings. In fact you'll even be able to see its biggest moon Titan, which will look like a tiny pinpoint of light. Now my favorite night for sky gazing this weekend will be Saturday the 6th when a slightly smaller waning gibbous Moon will be parked right next to the brightest star of Leo the Lion, the hot blue white star named Regulus. It marks the heart of Leo if we picture the stars of Leo as a reclining lion, kind of like the great Sphinx of Egypt. So this Friday the gibbous Moon is parked directly above Saturn and on Saturday below it but right next to wonderful Regulus.

And in case you're wondering how different each of these objects is let me just say that whereas our Moon is a 2,000 mile wide natural satellite of Earth, Saturn is the second biggest planet in our solar system, so big we could fit 42,000 Moons inside it. Regulus however is a different story because it is a very hot blue white star with a surface temperature of 24,000 degrees Fahrenheit and so huge, about 4 1/2 million miles wide, we could fit 192,000 Saturns inside it! And if you want to see just how fast the Moon travels and watch it shrink some more, 24 hours later Sunday night the 7th at 10 p.m. you'll see an even skinnier gibbous Moon just above the eastern horizon on a straight line with Regulus and Saturn. So this weekend use a waning gibbous Moon to find both Saturn and the heart of Leo. Friday night, Saturday night and Sunday night. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


 

Star Gazer Minute

#07-01 M

1/01/2007 thru 1/07/2007

"Use The Moon To Find The Ringed Planet
And The Heart Of Leo The Lion"

Horkheimer: You can use the Moon this weekend to find a planet with rings and the heart star of Leo the Lion. On Friday at 10 p.m. face east and you'll see a gibbous, which means hump-shaped, Moon just above planet #6, 75,000 mile wide Saturn. On Saturday it will be parked right next to Regulus the heart star of Leo the Lion. And on Sunday it will be just above the horizon on a straight line with Regulus and Saturn. Saturn is so huge it could hold 42,000 of our Moons but Regulus is so huge it could hold 192,000 Saturns! Use the Moon to find both of them this Friday, this Saturday and this Sunday night. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Reel # 612 One-hour feed
Wednesday 12/20/06 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0701, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode #07-02 /1518th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 1/08/2007 through Sunday 1/14/2007

"Use The Moon To Find The Biggest Planet
And An Even Bigger Star"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. This Sunday January 14th and Monday January 15th you'll be able to use an exquisite waning crescent Moon to find the king of the planets and one of the biggest stars you can see with the naked eye. There is one catch, however. You'll have to get up with the chickens. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Sunday January 14th about an hour before sunrise facing south east where you'll see an exquisite 25 day old waning crescent Moon complete with earthshine which will look like a grayish black full Moon nestled within the bright crescent. And that term earthshine is a very descriptive term compared with moonshine. Because while the bright slender crescent you'll see this Sunday is called moonshine, it's really reflected sunshine because the Moon does not make its own light. It simply reflects light from the sun.

So moonshine is reflected sunshine. Earthshine is an entirely different story however. It's actually sunshine bouncing off the daytime side of our Earth onto the darkened portion of the Moon, which is then reflected back to Earth. So earthshine is sunlight, which bounces off our Earth onto the Moon and then back again. And the only time we can see this earthshine phenomenon is during phases of either the waxing which means growing, crescent Moon and the waning which means shrinking, crescent Moon. Don't miss it because it's absolutely beautiful.

Now once you've found the Moon look over to its left and the brightest object you'll see is the king of our sun's planets, 88,000 mile wide Jupiter, which is so huge we could line up 11 of our Earths side by side across its middle. And please if you got a telescope for Christmas take a look at Jupiter because not only will you be able to see details of its layers of storm systems but you'll also be able to watch its four largest moons as they change position from night to night as they orbit the king. In fact you can even see Jupiter's four largest moons with a pair of binoculars.

Next if you look just down and to the right of Jupiter you'll see another giant object, although much dimmer than Jupiter because it's so much farther away, the red star called Antares which marks the heart of Scorpius the Scorpion. And to make sure you've found it simply go out 24 hours later on Monday January 15th and an even skinnier crescent Moon complete with earthshine will be parked right next to it. What could be simpler? And although Antares looks dimmer than Jupiter from our perspective, it nevertheless blows Jupiter away because it is a star 600 times as wide as our own sun. It is in fact so huge we could line up 5800 Jupiters across its middle. Wow! Once again this Sunday the crescent Moon with earthshine is up and to the right of the king of the planets. And on Monday it's huddled right next to the second biggest star we can see with the naked eye! Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


 

Star Gazer Minute

#07-02 M

1/08/2007 thru 1/14/2007

"Use The Moon To Find The Biggest Planet
And An Even Bigger Star"

Horkheimer: Next Sunday and Momday you can use a crescent moon to find the king of the planets and a humongous star. This Sunday an hour before sunrise face southeast and just below an exquisite waning crescent Moon you'll see 88,000 mile wide Jupiter. It's so big we could line up 11 of our Earths across it smiddle.On Monday an even skinnier crescent will be parked right next to the red star Antares which marks the heart of Scorpius. And although it looks dimmer than Jupiter because it's so much farther away, inreality it makes Jupiter look puny by comparison. In fact Antares is so huge we could line up 5800 Jupiters across its middle. Wow! Keep Looking Up!


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Reel # 612 One-hour feed
Wednesday 12/20/06 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0701, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705

 


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 07-03 / 1519th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 1/15/2007 through Sunday 1/21/2007

"Which Season Is The Longest? And
Which Is The Shortest? Spring, Summer,
Autumn Or Winter"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and I'll just bet that most of you are under the impression that the 4 seasons are equal in length, when in fact none of them are the same number of days and nights long. So which season is the longest and which is the shortest? Well I'll bet most school children would say that summer is the shortest because it seems to just fly by. But is that true or is it simply a matter of human perception? Let's find out.

O.K. now everyone knows that our Earth makes one trip around the Sun once a year. In fact, astronomically speaking that's exactly what a year is ... The amount of time it takes for any planet to make one trip around the Sun, and one Earth trip is 365 1/4 Earth days long. Now according to Kepler's laws of motion the closer a planet is to the Sun the faster it will travel ... The farther it is from the Sun the slower it will travel. So, because our Earth's orbit is not a perfect circle, but is a slightly stretched out circle called an ellipse and since our Sun is not at the center of this ellipse our Earth actually varies its distance from the Sun during the year. When it's closest to the Sun it travels fastest and when it's farthest it travels slowest. Now believe it or not our Earth is actually closest to the Sun in January and farthest in July. So our Earth actually travels faster when it's winter in the northern hemisphere and slower during the summer. Let me show you.

O.K., on the first day of spring our Earth is traveling at a speed of 66,900 miles per hour and is moving farther from the Sun and slowing down and thus takes 93 days to go from the first day of spring to the first day of summer, so spring is 93 days long. Then the Earth continues to slow down until it is at its farthest point from the Sun the first week of July when it reaches its slowest speed of 65,500 miles per hour. Thereafter, because it's starting to move back closer to the Sun it slowly starts to speed up. Even so it takes 94 days for our Earth to travel from the first day of summer to the first day of fall, which makes summer 94 days long. Then as it moves closer and closer to the Sun it picks up more speed day by day so that it takes only 90 days to travel from the first day of fall to the first day of winter. Thus fall is 90 days long. And our Earth continues to speed up until it reaches its closest point to the Sun the first week of January, zipping along at 67,600 miles per hour which is 2,200 miles per hour faster than its speed in July. In fact, it takes only 89 days for our Earth to go from the first day of winter to the first day of spring.

So even though summer feels like the shortest season to any school kid, winter is actually 5 days shorter and is the shortest season of the year for the northern hemisphere. And summer is the longest. In the southern hemisphere it would be just the reverse. Happy 'shortest season of the year'. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.

 


 

Star Gazer Minute

#07-03 M

1/15/2007 thru 1/21/2007

"Which Season Is The Longest? And
Which Is The Shortest? Spring, Summer,
Autumn Or Winter"

Horkheimer: Have you ever wondered which season is the longest or shortest? Well, I'll bet most school kids would say summer is the shortest because it just flies by. But is that simply a matter of human perception? You see, our Earth's orbit is not a perfect circle, but is an ellipse so our Earth actually varies its distance from the Sun during the year. When it's closer to the Sun it travels faster, when it's farther away it travels slower. And believe it or not the Earth is closer in winter and travels over 2,200 miles per hour faster than it does in summer. So fast in fact that winter, which is 89 days long, is actually 5 days shorter than summer, which is 94 days long, for the northern hemisphere. So summer is the longest season! Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Reel # 612 One-hour feed
Wednesday 12/20/06 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0701, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705

 


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 07-04 / 1520th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 1/22/2007 through Sunday 1/28/2007

"Three Pretty Planets For Your Early Evening Pleasure"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. And although it's a bit chilly out for planet gazing nevertheless this February 2007 offers in early evening not one, not two, but three wonderful objects for planet chasers. Planet #1, planet #2 and planet #6. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for the first week of February, about an hour after sunset facing west southwest where smack dab in front of you, you will see the most brilliant of all the planets, planet #2, 8,000 mile wide Venus which is often referred to as "the evening star". But once in awhile there are two evening stars and such is the case the first and second week of this February because just directly below Venus is the planet we call the pink iron planet, planet #1 from the Sun, 3,000 mile wide Mercury. It's called the pink iron planet because it always looks pinkish due to the fact that it never gets very high up off the horizon. So we always see it through the dusty layers of atmosphere, which make it appear pink even though it is not pink itself. It's called the iron planet because it actually has more iron in its core than our entire Earth does. So we have two so-called evening stars to open up the coldest month of the year.

Now Mercury quickly darts in and out of evening and morning skies a few times a year so it's difficult to catch unless you find it at its farthest visual point from the Sun, which is called greatest elongation, and luckily this occurs on Wednesday Feb. 7th which means Mercury will be at its highest above the horizon. So don't miss these two planets which our ancestors always called the "evening stars" when they were seen in the evening just after Sunset and "the morning stars" when they were seen just before sunrise. On Thursday February 1st around 8 p.m. look east and you'll see an almost full Moon right in front of you. Look directly below it and the brightest cosmic object you'll see is planet #6, 75,000 mile wide ringed planet Saturn. Which on February 10th will be at its closest and brightest for the entire year, and which just begs you to get out a small telescope. But in case you miss it on Thursday night go out the next night Friday Groundhog Day night and an exquisite full Moon will be parked right underneath it which is the perfect telescopic opportunity to not only look at Saturn but to also peruse the lunar mountains, valleys, seas and craters.

Now February's full Moon has three names which are all very descriptive of February, the Cold Moon, the Hunger Moon and the Wolf Moon. And if you were a wolf out under this February full Moon you would indeed probably be both cold and hungry and perhaps howling a bit in protest. So get thee outside the first week of February to see three pretty planets: the ringed planet only a week away from its closest approach to Earth plus the two planets known to our ancestors as "the evening stars". Bundle up and keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#07-04 M

1/22/2007 thru 1/28/2007

"Three Pretty Planets For Your Early Evening Pleasure"

Horkheimer:

We have three pretty planets for you in early evening the first week of February. An hour after sunset face southwest and you'll see dazzling planet #2, 8,000 mile wide Venus. Just below it you'll see planet #1, the pink planet, 3,000 mile wide Mercury. On Friday February 2nd, Groundhog Day night, at 8 p.m. look east and you'll se a beautiful full Moon parked just underneath planet #6, 75,000 mile wide Saturn. So through a telescope you'll see not only Saturn's rings but also the Moon's mountains, valleys, seas and craters. February's full Moon is called the Cold Moon, the Hunger Moon and the Wolf Moon. And if you were a wolf howling at the Moon in February you'd probably be cold and hungry too. Keep looking Up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer



STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Reel # 612 One-hour feed
Wednesday 12/20/06 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0701, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705

 


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 07-05 / 1521st Show

To Be Aired : Monday 1/29/2007 through Sunday 2/04/2007

"How To Find The Most Wonderful "Star" Of Winter
Which Isn't A Star At All"

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers. You know winter has its compensations because even though you can't stay outside star gazing for as long a time as you can in summer you can in that short time see more bright stars in winter's skies than in any other season. Plus winter skies contain some of the most incredible cosmic objects you can ever see with the naked eye. And one of the most wonderful and my personal favorite is a star, which really isn't a star at all. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for any night the next few weeks in early evening facing southeast where you will see winter's most famous constellation Orion the Hunter. Three evenly spaced stars in a row mark his belt and above them two brilliant stars mark his shoulders and below two more mark his knees. And although i usually talk about these brightest stars every January, this year I'd like to zero in on one of Orion's dimmer "stars" because as magnificent as Orion's bright stars are, it is one of his dimmer stars that is one of the most awesome wonders of our nearby universe.

To find it simply look below his three evenly spaced belt stars for three more evenly spaced much, much dimmer stars, which make up his sword. And then if you look very carefully at these three stars you will notice that no matter how sharp your eyesight, the middle "star" always seems to look fuzzy and slightly out of focus. And that's because this so-called middle star is not a star at all but something we call a nebula, which is a great cosmic cloud of gas and dust out of which brand new stars have been and are still being born. In fact this nebula, the Orion Nebula is a stellar womb, a birthplace and nursery of stars, a place where new stars are being created. And incredibly you can see this great cloud and some of the new born stars embedded in it with even the cheapest pair of binoculars. And even better, with a small telescope you'll be able to see the four recently born stars which illuminate this vast cloud. They are arranged in the shape of a baseball diamond and are called the Trapezium.

Now although the Orion Nebula looks tiny to the naked eye, in reality its size is mind boggling because there is enough material in this nebula to produce over 10,000 stars the size of our Sun. In fact, it is an outrageous 30 light years in diameter, which means it takes 30 years for light to travel from one end of it to the other; so huge it would take 20,000 of our solar systems lined up end to end to reach from one edge of the Nebula to the other. Or to put it another way, if the distance from our Earth to the Sun were only one inch, the distance across the Orion Nebula would be 12 miles. Is that mind boggling or what? So get thee outside to see the wonderful fuzzy middle "star" in the sword of Orion and experience some of the awe and wonder of winter's brilliant night skies. I'm Jack Horkheimer, keep looking up!


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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#07-05 M

1/29/2007 thru 2/04/2007

"How To Find The Most Wonderful "Star" Of Winter
Which Isn't A Star At All"

Horkheimer: Everyone loves Orion's bright stars but it is one of his dimmer stars that will blow you away. Face southeast and below Orion's three belt stars you'll see three dimmer stars, which make up his sword. But no matter how sharp your eyesight the middle star always seems to look fuzzy, out of focus. That's because it isn't a star at all but a humongous cosmic cloud of gas and dust where new stars are being born. We call it the Orion Nebula and there is enough material here to produce over ten thousand stars the size of our Sun. In fact, if the distance from our Earth to the Sun were one inch the distance across the Orion Nebula would be 12 miles! How's that for a fuzzy little star? Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


[SmilinJack]Return to the [STAR GAZER Main Page]