STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

6/20/2001 9:30 - 10:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


STAR GAZER

Episode # 01-27 / 1230th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 7/2/2001 through Sunday 7/8/2001

"The July 2001 Super Planet Show!"

 

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings fellow star gazers and even though Mars is still at its brightest and closest since 1988, and at its highest due south at midnight, 4 other planets are about to steal the show because this July Venus, Saturn, Mercury and Jupiter will perform a celestial ballet with Aldebaran, the eye of Taurus the Bull that will change every day and absolutely keep you fascinated. Let me show you:

O.K, we've got our skies set up for this Sunday, July 8th, one hour before sunrise and if you look east the brightest thing you'll see is 8,000 mile wide Venus, out dazzling everything else in the sky. And just below it, much dimmer but still lovely, 75,000 mile wide Saturn. And off to its side the reddish-orange eye of Taurus, Aldebaran, a 35 million mile wide star, 40 times as wide as our sun, and so huge it could hold over 98 million Saturns or 94 billion Venuses. Wow!

Then if you look very close to the east-northeast horizon you will see 88,000 mile wide bright Jupiter which you can use as a guide to find much dimmer, pinkish 3,000 mile wide Mercury. But what happens during the next 2 weeks is absolutely wonderful because if you go out each day at the same time you can watch these planets change their positions relative to one another in a cosmic ballet that defies description. On Monday the 9th you will notice that Venus and Saturn are a bit closer, on Tuesday the 10th, closer still, and Jupiter is now side by side with Mercury. On Wednesday Venus and Saturn even closer and Jupiter is slightly above Mercury. Thursday Saturn and Venus closer, Jupiter and Mercury closer. And on Friday the 13th, ta da! Mercury and Jupiter will be at their closest and Saturn and Venus will be closing in on each other. On Saturday the 14th Saturn and Venus will be extremely close and Jupiter and Mercury start moving apart. But ta da! On Sunday the 15th Saturn and Venus will be at their closest, less than 1 degree away from each other. Wow! Don't miss this.

On Monday Saturn and Venus are only slightly farther apart, but Tuesday July 17th is the one day you absolutely can not miss! On Tuesday an exquisite crescent moon complete with earth-shine will be huddled right up next to Saturn, Venus and Aldebaran in a foursome you will not soon forget. Wednesday is pretty good too when the crescent moon will appear between Venus and Jupiter and the 4 planets and moon will appear to be lined up in a perfect row. And if you have a flat unobstructed horizon on Thursday the 19th you may even see the slenderest of crescent moons possible, almost on top of pinkish Mercury. And pay close attention to Jupiter and Venus because they are moving closer together each day for an extremely close meeting on August 6th! What a month! Don't miss this super planet ballet. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#01-27 M

7/02/2001 thru 7/08/2001

"Four Pre-Dawn Panets!"


Horkheimer: 4 planets are visible every morning before dawn. The brightest is 8,000 mile wide Venus. Below it 75,000 wide Saturn and the eye of Taurus, the 35 million mile wide star Aldebaran. Below them 88,000 mile wide Jupiter and below it 3,000 mile wide Mercury. Watch every day and these planets will change their positions in an incredible celestial ballet. Friday the 13th Mercury and Jupiter are at their closest and on Sunday the 15th Saturn and Venus are closest. But the most spectacular grouping of all will occur Tuesday the 17th when an exquisite crescent moon, Saturn, Venus and Aldebaran cluster together in a sight you'll not soon forget. Plus on the 17th the 4 planets and moon will line up in a row. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer







STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

6/20/2001 9:30 - 10:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #01-28 /1231st Show
To Be Aired : Monday 7/09/2001 through Sunday 7/15/2001

"July's Fabulous Pre-Dawn
Celestial Extravaganza"

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings fellow star gazers and right now mark Tuesday July 17th on your calendars. Why? Let me show you: O.K.. We've got our skies set up for Tuesday July 17th, 1 hour before sunrise, facing east where you will see an outrageous gathering of 2 planets, the moon and a star with 2 planets down below looking on. The most obvious object will be an exquisite crescent moon complete with earthshine which looks like a dark full moon nestled inside the crescent, but which is really light bouncing off our earth onto the moon and back to us again. And to its left the 6th planet out from the sun, ringed Saturn and nestled right underneath it, the brightest planet of all which is often mistakenly called the 'morning star', the 2nd planet, Venus. And off to its right, dimmest of the 4 to the naked eye, but the most wondrous of all, the reddish-orange star which marks the eye of Taurus the Bull, Aldebaran. And believe me, this grouping will absolutely take your breath away.

In addition to which if you look just above them before it gets light out you'll be able to see The Pleiades, the Seven Sisters riding on the shoulder of Taurus. Plus if you have a clear, flat, unobstructed horizon you will see planet #5, the king of the planets, Jupiter. And below it, planet #1, tiny pinkish Mercury. Don't miss this sight please. But if you do, the days previous to this gathering and following it are still very good and if we start with the end of this week you'll see how everything pulls together for the Tuesday the 17th spectacular. Go out Friday July 13th 1 hour before sunrise and you will notice that Jupiter and Mercury are very close to each other, as are Saturn and Venus. And Saturday morning July 14th Saturn and Venus will be even closer, getting ready to change places after they pass each other.

Then ta da! on Sunday July 15th Saturn and Venus will be at their closest, less than 1 degree away from each other, but you'll also notice that Jupiter and Mercury have started to move farther apart. On Monday the 16th Jupiter is even farther away from Mercury and Venus is now down below Saturn. And on the 16th it is apparent that a crescent moon will soon join them. And yes indeed, ta da! on Tuesday July 17th the super spectacular extravaganza grouping takes place! Then on Wednesday an even skinnier crescent is smack dab between Venus and Jupiter and on Thursday the 19th, wow! The moon and Mercury will look as if they are touching.

And think about this on the 17th, while our moon is 2,000 miles wide, Venus is 8,000 miles wide and Saturn 75,000 miles wide but 35 million wide Aldebaran is so huge it could hold 98 million Saturns or 94 billion Venuses or ta da!, 4 trillion moons! Wow! Yet it is the dimmest of them all, simply because it is so incredibly far away. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.



Star Gazer Minute

#01-28 M

7/09/2001 thru 7/15/2001

"July's Pre-Dawn
Celestial Extravaganza"

Horkheimer: Mark July 17th on your calendar right now as the morning of a pre-dawn celestial extravaganza. Simply look east and you'll see an outrageous gathering of 2 planets, the moon and a star with 2 planets down below looking on. An exquisite crescent moon, complete with earthshine will be in a huddle with planet #6, Saturn, planet #2 Venus and the wonderful red-orange star which marks the eye of Taurus, Aldebaran. And think about this: our moon is 2,000 miles wide, Venus is 8,000 miles wide and Saturn is 75,000 miles wide, but 35 million mile wide Aldebaran is so huge it could hold 98 million Saturns or 94 billion Venuses or ta da! 4 trillion moons. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

6/20/2001 9:30 - 10:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)

Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 01-29 / 1232nd Show

To Be Aired : Monday 7/16/2001 through Sunday 7/22/2001

"Destination Vega:
The Brightest Star
Of The Summer Triangle "

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings fellow star gazers and have you ever looked up at the night sky and wondered what direction we're headed? I mean, all the stars are flying through space at different speeds and since our sun is also a star, it too is flying though space. So what direction is our sun and our planet earth headed? Let me show you:

O.K., We've got our skies set up for any clear night the next couple of weeks, about 9 to 10 P.M. your local time. And if you look east, half way up from the horizon to overhead you will see a very bright star. That bright star is the 5th brightest star we can see from earth and its name is Vega and it is the brightest of the 3 bright stars that make up the Summer Triangle. In fact, it is so bright that when it's overhead it is often referred to as the arc light of summer nights.

Now its blue-white color tells us that it is blue-white hot which is much hotter than our own yellow-orange sun. In fact, while our sun is only 10,000 degrees hot at its so-called surface, Vega is 17,000 degrees and it is over twice as wide. Indeed, whereas our sun is 865,000 miles wide, Vega is 2 million miles in diameter. Plus if we could place Vega and our sun at the same distance Vega would shine 58 times brighter! Talk about getting a sun tan in a hurry! But one of the niftiest things about Vega is although it is far away from the north star, Vega itself actually was the North Star 14, 500 years ago.

You see, because of a regular wobbling motion of our earth which is kind of like a top slowing down, our earth's axis doesn't always point to the star we call our north star. In fact our earth's axis traces a great circle in the sky and approximately once every 26,000 years it points to Vega. So 14 1/2 thousand years ago Vega was the north star of our cave man ancestors and it will once again be the north star 11 1/2 thousand years in the future. And if you haven't guessed it already, Vega is the star in whose direction our sun and our earth are headed. Indeed, our sun and earth are racing at the incredible speed of 12 miles per second towards Vega, but because Vega is 27 light years away, even at this outrageous speed it would take our sun almost 500 million years to reach Vega, if it would remain in the same place, which it won't.

At any rate, go out some night the next couple of weeks between 9 and 10 P.M. look high above the eastern horizon for the 3 bright stars of the Summer Triangle. Concentrate on Vega and see if you can feel in your mind's eye our earth and all of us on it zooming through space, 12 miles per second, toward Vega and imagine at the same time that in only 11 1/2 thousand years it will once again be our north star. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#01-29 M

7/16/2001 thru 7/22/2001

"Vega: The Brightest Star
Of The Summer Triangle"

Horkheimer: All the stars are flying through space and since our sun is a star, it too is flying through space. So where is it headed? Look east and you'll see Vega, the brightest of the 3 stars of the Summer Triangle. It's much hotter than our sun, 17,000 degrees and over twice its size, 2 million miles wide. Every 26,000 years earth's axis points to Vega.. 14 1/2 thousand years ago Vega was our north star and it will be our north star again 11 1/2 thousand years in the future. And it is the star toward which our sun and earth are racing at the incredible speed of 12 miles per second. But because Vega is 27 light years away it would take our sun 500 million years to reach it. I don't think I'll wait around. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer





STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

6/20/2001 9:30 - 10:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #01-30 /1233rd Show
To Be Aired : Monday 7/23/2001 through Sunday 7/29/2001

"Altair: The Weird But
Wonderful Second Brightest
Star Of The Summer Triangle"

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings fellow star gazers. Last time I gave you a close look at the brightest star of the Summer Triangle, Vega. But wonderful as it is, it can't beat the second brightest star of the triangle, Altair when it comes to weird and wonderful because that's exactly what Altair is. Let me show you:

O.K., We've got our skies set up for early evening, late July - early August and if you look east you'll see the 3 bright stars that make up the points of the Summer Triangle, the brightest being Vega in Lyra the Harp, the 2nd brightest Altair in Aquila the Eagle and the 3rd brightest, Deneb marking the tail of Cygnus the Swan. Now although there are many strange stars in the heavens, Altair is one of the strangest. Located only 16 light years away from us, which is pretty close starwise, it is the 12th brightest star we can see. And if we compare it to our million miles wide sun, Altair is 1 1/2 times its size. However, because it is not a relatively cool yellow star like our sun, but a hot white star, it is actually 9 times brighter.

But the really peculiar thing about Altair has to do with its rotation, the length of its day. You see a day for any star or planet is defined as the amount of time it takes for a star or planet to make one complete turn on its axis. Now we all know that our earth makes one turn on its axis every 24 hours so an earth day is 24 hours long. Our sun however has a much longer day because it makes one complete turn on its axis every 25 1/2 earth days. So one sun day is 25 1/2 earth days long. Thus one might be led to incorrectly think that because our sun is so much larger than our earth and turns so much slower, that an even larger star like Altair would turn even slower than our sun turns. But such is not the case.

In fact, Altair doesn't turn slower than our sun, it is instead one of the fastest rotating stars known. Indeed, Altair's rotational speed at its equator is 160 miles per second which means that Altair rotates once every 6 1/2 hours. So one Altair day is only 1/4 of an earth day long, plus its incredibly fast rotational speed produces one very weird effect. Indeed, Altair spins so rapidly that it bulges out all around its middle... so much so that Altair is twice as wide from side to side as it is from top to bottom. This gives Altair the distinction of having one of the worst waist line problems of any star in the cosmos. So get thee outside to see this totally out-of-shape second brightest star of the 3 stars which make up the Summer Triangle and remember that the faster a star or planet turns, the wider it gets. In fact, if you check out the rotational speeds of the planets you'll notice that because Jupiter rotates once every 10 1/2 hours, it too is wider from side to side than from top to bottom and if it were as big as Altair it would look almost as weird. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#01-30M

7/23/2001 thru 7/29/2001

"Weird But Wonderful Altair!"

Horkheimer: Stars like planets, are round. Right? Wrong! Look east for the 3 bright stars of the Summer Triangle and the second brightest, Altair, shows itself up close to be one of the weirdest stars around. About 1 1/2 times the size of our sun and 9 times brighter , its rotational speed is what makes it so peculiar. While our sun rotates once every 25 1/2 days , Altair rotates once every 6 1/2 hours which causes Altair to bulge out all around its middle. In fact Altair is twice as wide from side to side as it is from top to bottom which gives Altair the distinction of having one of the worst waistline problems of any star in the cosmos. Check it out for yourself. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only
Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer

 


 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

6/20/2001 9:30 - 10:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #01-31 /1234th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 7/30/2001 through Sunday 8/5/2001

"A Spectacular Meeting of
The Two Brightest Planets
This Weekend, and
Mars Pulls Away From Antares"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and yes indeed, the 2 brightest planets, Venus and Jupiter will have a spectacular pre dawn meeting this weekend plus the still brilliant Mars dominates early evening as it slowly pulls away from its rival, Antares. Let me show you: O.K., we've got our skies set up for an hour after sunset this week and next, facing south where you will see my favorite constellation of summer, the giant fish hook shaped pattern of stars, Scorpius the Scorpion, followed by my second favorite pattern of summer, the teapot portion of Sagittarius.

And shining like a brilliant red-orange-gold jewel in the sky is our celebrity planet of the season, 4,000 mile wide Mars which only 5 weeks ago on the 1st night of summer was at its closest and brightest in 13 years, only 42 million miles away and which is still very bright, although not quite as bright because it has moved 10 million miles farther away from us and is 52 million miles away this week. But it is still the jewel of the evening and as of July 19th it has begun to once again move away from its rival namesake, the star which marks the heart of the scorpion, Antares.

And if you watch week after week Mars will steadily move eastward farther away from Antares as it rapidly gets dimmer and dimmer and only 5 1/2 months from now in January 2002, it will once again be only as bright as Antares and they will look almost identical in color and size, although there the similarity ends because Antares is a 500 million mile wide star, so huge that over 2 billion million Mars' could fit inside it. Only its incredible distance from us betrays its true nature. So see Mars now because it will rapidly dim as it rapidly moves away from its namesake Antares, which literally means 'The Rival of Mars'.

And if you want to see something really dramatic and spectacular, simply look east about an hour before sunrise Monday, July 30th and you will see the 2 brightest planets, 8,000 mile wide Venus, which because it's closer will look much brighter than 88,000 mile wide Jupiter. And if you watch them every day this week you'll notice that they will steadily move closer and closer toward each other in a celestial planetary ballet that will take your breath away ... a planetary pas de deux which will reach its climax on Sunday morning the 5th and Monday morning the 6th when these brightest planets of them all will pay each other an extremely close visit and will be little more than 1 degree apart from each other. Wow! Don't miss this.

Plus you'll also enjoy watching them pull apart from each other next week! So there you have it, Mars and Antares an hour after sunset, and Venus and Jupiter an hour before sunrise putting on a planetary sky show that will make mornings seem special. And the wonderful part is that these 3 planets are so bright that you can see them from even the most brilliantly lit up urban neighborhoods, provided it's clear out of course. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#01-31M

7/30/2001 thru 8/5/2001

"A Three Planet Sky Show"

Horkheimer: We have 3 incredibly bright planets for you. 1 in the evening and 2 before sunrise. 4,000 mile wide Mars, which was at its closest and brightest in 13 years the 1st night of summer is still very bright even though it has moved 10 million miles farther away. And although it is still much brighter than its rival which marks the heart of the Scorpion, Antares, it will rapidly dim and by January will be no brighter than Antares. Look east before sunrise and you can watch Venus and Jupiter close in on each other until they reach their closest on Sunday and Monday. Then next week you can watch them slowly pull apart. Wow! 3 bright planets for your pleasure! I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only
Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer



[SmilinJack]Return to the [STAR GAZER Main Page]