STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Monday 6/20/05 - 1000-1030 Eastern Time 4 Shows

Half Hour Feed - 4 shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 05-27 / 1439th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 7/04/2005 through
Sunday 7/10/2005

"Venus And Mercury Continue Their Pas De Deux"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. This week and next the two planets closest to the Sun, Mercury and Venus continue their extremely close meeting plus if you have a hard time identifying planets you can use the Moon on Tuesday and Wednesday, July 12th and 13th, to find Jupiter. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Friday July 8th about 45 minutes after sunset while there's still twilight and if you look west northwest you will see an exquisite sight, a very young crescent Moon complete with Earthshine which looks like a black full Moon nestled within the crescent and directly below it the brightest planet of them all, 8,000 mile wide Venus and only 2 degrees below it the tiny 3,000 mile wide pink planet Mercury. And if you've got a pair of binoculars please use them because seeing this threesome through binoculars will be absolutely spectacular. I must remind you however that you have to have a clear flat horizon in order to see Mercury and be sure to look during evening twilight because by dark it will have set. On Saturday Mercury and Venus will still be only 2 degrees apart but the Moon will have gotten a little fatter and will be just to the right of the brightest star of Leo the Lion, Regulus. On Sunday Mercury and Venus will be a little farther apart but the Moon will be well beyond Regulus up to its left. Then night after night you can watch Mercury and Venus pull away from each other a little farther each night and you might want to keep track just how long you can see Mercury before it disappears below the horizon.

Now on Tuesday the 12th Mercury and Venus will be only 3 degrees apart and if you look up to their left, west southwest you'll see an exquisite almost first quarter Moon parked just down and to the right of the king of the planets 88,000 mile wide Jupiter. And on Wednesday the 13th they'll be even closer to each other with the Moon just past Jupiter. Don't miss this exquisite sight. Tuesday the 12th, the Moon to Jupiter's right, Wednesday the 13th the Moon just past the super planet, second in brightness only to Venus. But once again may I remind you that these apparent close meetings between planets and the Moon are simply an optical illusion. This weekend Mercury will be 69 million miles away from Earth whereas Venus will be 133 million miles away! Plus next Wednesday when Jupiter appears closest to the Moon, our 2,000 mile wide Moon will be only 242,000 miles away whereas Jupiter will be a whopping 516 million miles beyond!

Once again be sure you catch Venus and Mercury while they're still a close pair even though they are pulling apart and then use an exquisite Moon to find the planet king on Tuesday the 12th and Wednesday the 13th. Time to get out the binoculars or a small telescope this week and next. Keep looking up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#05-27 M

7/04/2005 thru 7/10/2005

"Venus And Mercury Continue Their Pas De Deux"

Horkheimer: The two planets closest to the Sun continue their extremely close meeting and you can use the Moon next week to find Jupiter. This weekend just after sunset look for Venus and Mercury close to the western horizon and then night after night you can watch them slowly pull apart although they will still be super close for several nights. Next Tuesday an almost first quarter Moon will be parked to the right of the king of the planets, 88,000 mile wide Jupiter and on Wednesday the Moon will be even closer just past Jupiter. So use the Moon to find the king on Tuesday and Wednesday and catch Mercury and Venus while they're still super close. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer







STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Monday 6/20/05 - 1000-1030 Eastern Time 4 Shows

Half Hour Feed - 4 shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



 

STAR GAZER

Episode #05-28 /1440th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 7/11/2005 through Sunday 7/17/2005

"The Moon Hides A Giant Star And Venus Visits A Blue Star"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Mark Sunday July 17th on your calendar as a night when many of you will be able to see an exquisite waxing Moon hide the giant red star that marks the heart of the Scorpion and also mark Friday the 22nd as the night Venus huddles close to regulus the bright blue star which marks the heart of Leo. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Saturday the 16th about 45 minutes after sunset facing south where you'll see an exquisite waxing just past first quarter Moon and to it's left the giant fish hook shaped pattern of stars called Scorpius the Scorpion. And right where the scorpion's heart should be you'll see the red star Antares. Then if you go out every couple of hours or so you will see the Moon move closer and closer to Antares in anticipation of a spectacular event, which will occur the next night Sunday July 17th. An event astronomers call an occultation which simply means that the Moon on Sunday evening or early Monday morning depending on where you live will briefly occult that is hide Antares from view as the Moon passes in front of it. Unfortunately people in the northern part of the United States and Canada will have a near miss occultation and the Moon will appear not to cover Antares but to pass very close by it. If however you live in the lower U.S. you will be able to see it.

Now the times for the occultation will be different depending upon where you live so go to our web site for exact times in your area. If you live in San Francisco or Los Angeles the Moon will cover Antares sometime between 8 and 9 p.m. local time whereas if you live in Miami the occultation will begin about 12:45 a.m. Monday morning. I think occultations are neat especially an occultation of Antares because then you can mentally contrast the size and distance of this wonderful star and our Moon. In fact on Sunday night our 2,000 mile wide Moon will be only 227,000 miles away from Earth whereas Antares is 500 million miles wide and 600 light years away! Which means it takes light from Antares 600 years to reach us whereas it takes only 1 and 1/3 seconds for the Moon's light to reach us. Don't miss this occultation please. And if you have a pair of binoculars or a small telescope this sight will blow you away!

Now while you're out Sunday night if you look west you'll see the brightest planet of them all Venus only 6 degrees away from the blue star Regulus which marks the heart of Leo. And if you watch night after night you will see them move closer and closer to each other. On Monday they'll be 4 and 1/2 degrees apart, Tuesday 3. 6 degrees apart, Thursday only 1 1/2 degrees apart and on Friday they'll be at their absolute closest, only 1 1/10 degrees apart, after which they will rapidly pull away from each other. So there you have it an exquisite occultation of the Scorpion's heart by the Moon, plus Venus pays a super close visit to the heart of the Lion. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#05-28 M

7/11/2005 thru 7/17/2005

"The Moon Hides A Giant Star And Venus Visits A Blue Star"

Horkheimer: On July 17th the Moon will hide the red heart of the scorpion and on the 22nd Venus will huddle next to the blue star which marks the heart of Leo. Some time Sunday night the 17th people in the southern half of U.S. Will see our 2,000 mile wide Moon slowly pass over and briefly hide from view 500 million mile wide Antares the red heart of Scorpius. For exact times in your area please visit our web site. Then on Friday the 22nd the brightest planet Venus will park only one degree away from Regulus the blue heart star of Leo the Lion. Both events are fun to see with the naked eye but super if you have a pair of binoculars. I'm Jack Horkheimer, keep looking up!


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Monday 6/20/05 - 1000-1030 Eastern Time 4 Shows

Half Hour Feed - 4 shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 05-29 / 1441st Show

To Be Aired : Monday 7/18/2005 through Sunday 7/24/2005

"Use the Moon To Find Mars Which Is Now Brighter
Than Almost All The Stars In The Sky"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Next week on Wednesday and Thursday July 27th and 28th you'll be able to use the Moon to find Mars which is racing towards Earth and will be at its very closest and absolutely spectacular on Halloween. It is already 6 times brighter than it was at the beginning of the year and is now brighter than all but two of the brightest stars. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for 1 a.m. your local time any night this week looking due east where the brightest thing you'll see will be a reddish orange light, our old friend 4,000 mile wide Mars a planet almost exactly half as wide as planet Earth. Currently only five objects are brighter, the stars Sirius and Canopus, the planets Jupiter and Venus and our Moon. And if you haven't started to watch Mars on a regular basis now is the time to begin because Mars is hurtling towards us at breakneck speeds and will be brighter than any star in the sky and exceeded only by the Moon and Venus on Halloween when it reaches its brightest and closest to planet Earth until the year 2018. At the beginning of this year on January 1st it was 209 million miles away but this week it is 126 million miles closer only 83 million miles away. And if you watch it at least once a week from now through October you'll be absolutely blown away as it steadily brightens!

And fortunately if you're one of those people who has a problem finding the planets, one or two nights every month you'll be able to use the Moon to help you locate Mars. In fact next Wednesday July 27 at 1 a.m. you'll be able to see a 21 day old Moon only 6 degrees away from Mars which is roughly 12 full Moon widths away at which time the Moon will be 234 thousand miles away while Mars will be 79 1/2 million miles away. But if you go out just 4 hours later at 5 a.m. before sunrise Mars and the Moon will be much higher but the Moon will be only 5 degrees away from Mars, 4 full Moon widths closer and Mars will have raced a hundred thousand miles closer to Earth, only 79 million 400 thousand miles away. But if it's cloudy Wednesday, on Thursday morning you'll have another chance to use the Moon to find Mars because at 1 a.m. Thursday the 28th the Moon will have moved to the other side of Mars and will be only 8 degrees away. Plus to show you just how fast Mars is racing toward us, in just one day Mars will be half a million miles closer less than 79 million miles away. Wow!!

So start your Mars watch now. Go out around 1 a.m. any night this week and next, and it will be just above the eastern horizon and to find it super easy use the Moon as a finder on Wednesday the 27th at 1 a.m. and 5 a.m. and on Thursday the 28th at 1 a.m. and 5 a.m. Believe me if you watch Mars only once every couple of weeks you'll be absolutely astonished at how it brightens because as I said by Halloween when it's at its brightest it will be 6 times brighter than it is right now and it's already 6 times brighter now than it was in January. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#05-29M

7/18/2005 thru 7/24/2005

"Use the Moon To Find Mars Which Is Now Brighter
Than Almost All The Stars In The Sky"

Horkheimer: Next Wednesday and Thursday you can use the Moon to find Mars which is racing toward Earth and is now 6 times brighter than it was at the beginning of the year and which will be 6 times brighter than now on Halloween! On Wednesday at 1 a.m. the moon will be only 6 degrees away from Mars which will be 79 1/2 million miles away. But only 4 hours later the Moon will be only 5 degrees away and Mars will be a hundred thousand miles closer! On Thursday at 1 and 5 a.m. the Moon will be on the other side of Mars and in just one day Mars will be half a million miles closer! Watch it at least once a week and you'll be amazed at how rapidly Mars brightens. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Monday 6/20/05 - 1000-1030 Eastern Time 4 Shows

Half Hour Feed - 4 shows

Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #05-30 / 1442nd Show
To Be Aired : Monday 7/25/2005 through Sunday 7/31/2005

"The Three Bright Stars Of the Summer Triangle
Ride High In August's Night Sky"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Every August after it gets good and dark out the three wonderfully bright stars of the Summer Triangle ride high in the heavens. And although they look almost the same brightness to the naked eye nothing could be farther from the truth. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for the first two weeks of August around 10 p.m. facing east but way up high in the east not far from overhead, where you'll see three bright stars, the brightest of which is the first point in the Summer Triangle, and the closest to overhead, Vega, the fifth brightest star in the entire sky shining at what astronomers call 0 magnitude which makes it roughly 2 1/2 times brighter than the other two bright stars of the Summer Triangle, the first magnitude stars Altair and Deneb. And if indeed we connect these three very bright stars with lines we know where the name Summer Triangle comes from.

Now each star is the brightest star of the constellation to which it belongs. Vega belongs to the constellation Lyra the harp. Altair belongs to Aquila the eagle and Deneb is the tail star of Cygnus the swan. We can learn a lot about how bright and how far away stars really are just looking at these three. One would think that Vega, since it is the brightest, is the closest but it's not. In fact it is so far away it takes its light 25 years to reach us. Thus we say Vega is 25 light years away. It is almost 1/3 farther away than dimmer Altair which is the closest of the three only 17 light years away which means we see the light that left it only 17 years ago. So why is Vega so much brighter?

Simple. Vega is a much bigger and much hotter star. Compared to our almost one million mile wide Sun Vega is almost 2 and 1/2 times as wide, whereas Altair is only one and 1/3 times the width of our Sun. So next time you're out with friends star gazing, if someone in your group is 17 years old you'll be able to say, "Hey, look at Altair. We're seeing the light tonight that left that star during the year you were born." and if someone in your group is 25 years old simply say, "Hey look at Vega. The light we're seeing tonight is the light that left it during the year you were born." Kind of a nifty way to time travel huh?

But what about Deneb, which is only slightly dimmer than the closest, Altair? Well it is a whopping 1500 light years away, which means we see now the light that left it 1500 years ago. So if it's almost as bright as 17 light year away Altair it must be a much, much bigger star. And in fact it is a whopping 116 times the diameter of our Sun. Wow! In fact, as astronomer Fred Schaaf puts it, Deneb releases as much light in one night as our Sun does in a century. So get thee out any night in August and look for the three bright stars of the Summer Triangle riding high close to overhead. It's fascinating plus it's fun! Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#05-30 M

7/25/2005 thru 7/31/2005

"The Three Bright Stars Of the Summer Triangle
Ride High In August's Night Sky"

Horkheimer: The three bright stars of the Summer Triangle ride high in August. Look high up in the east around 10 p.m. and you'll see three bright stars Vega, Altair and Deneb which if connected make a very nice triangle. Although they look almost alike they're certainly not. Vega the brightest is actually farther away 25 light years than dimmer and closer 17 year light year away Altair. Vega looks brighter because it is a much bigger, hotter star, 2 1/2 times as wide as our Sun whereas Altair is only 1 1/3 times as wide. Deneb the dimmest is so far away it takes its light 1500 years to reach us. But it is so huge it releases as much light in one night as our Sun does in a century. Wow! Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


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