STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Wednesday 6/20/07 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0727, 0728, 0729, 0730, 0731


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 07-27 / 1543rd Show
To Be Aired : Monday 7/02/2007 through
Sunday 7/08/2007

"Three Planets For Independence Week And Our Earth At Aphelion"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. And believe it or not even though it's summer time in the northern hemisphere this week on Friday the 6th our Earth is officially at aphelion which translated means that it is at its most distant point from the Sun. Plus since this week is Independence Week we have three beautiful planets for your independent viewing just after it gets dark out. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for just after sunset any night this week and next facing west where you will be absolutely dazzled by the second planet from the Sun our so-called sister planet because it is almost the same size as our Earth, 8,000 mile wide Venus. And it is at greatest brilliancy for the entire first three weeks of this July 2007. Believe me it is absolutely dazzling! And if you have a small telescope you will see that it looks like a tiny crescent Moon because it goes through phases just like our Moon.

Now throughout history whenever Venus has appeared in the evening skies just after Sunset it has always been called the Evening Star. But whenever it has appeared in morning skies just before sunrise it has always been called the Morning Star. And Venus is seen as a Morning Star and an Evening Star at least once every year. In fact long, long ago many people believed that the Evening Star and the Morning Star were two entirely different objects. Of course today we know that Venus is not a star at all but a planet. And the reason it changes its position from Evening Star to Morning Star is simply because it changes its place in its orbit in respect to our Earth, thus our Earth sees it from different viewpoints during the course of the year.

Now look slightly below Venus about 8 full Moon widths away and you'll see a much dimmer light, which is the most beautiful planet in our solar system, 75,000 mile wide ringed Saturn. And if you have a small telescope please use it now before Saturn disappears below the horizon because it is absolutely spectacular! To find our third Independence Week planet just look south east and the brightest thing you'll see will be the king of the planets, 88,000 mile wide Jupiter. Now even though it is eleven times the diameter of brilliant Venus, nevertheless it takes second place in brightness to Venus because it is hundreds of millions of miles farther away. Even so through a small telescope you can see its weather systems and watch its four largest moons change position hour after hour as they orbit the planet king. And now on to aphelion!

O.K., if we could go out into space and look back at our Earth and our Sun we would see that this Friday July 6 our Earth is at its farthest distance from the Sun, 3.1 million miles farther away from the Sun than it was on January 3rd. So why isn't it colder rather than warmer? Well it is in the southern hemisphere. It's all due to the fact that our Earth is tilted to the plane of its orbit. Something to think about as you keep looking up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#07-27 M

7/02/2007 thru 7/08/2007

"Three Planets For Independence Week And Our Earth At Aphelion"

Horkheimer: Believe it or not this week our Earth is officially at aphelion which means that it is at its most distant point from the Sun. In fact it is 3.1 million miles farther away from the Sun than it was on January 3rd. So why isn't it colder rather than warmer? Well it is in the southern hemisphere. It's all due to the fact that our Earth is tilted to the plane of its orbit. Also this week you can see three dazzling planets just after sunset. In the west 8,000 mile wide Venus and 75,000 mile wide Saturn. And in the southeast 88,000 mile wide Jupiter! Look at all these through a small telescope and discover the wonders of planet gazing! Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Wednesday 6/20/07 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0727, 0728, 0729, 0730, 0731
Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.




STAR GAZER

Episode #07-28 /1544th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 7/09/2007 through Sunday 7/15/2007

"The Moon And Saturn, Venus And Regulus:
A Cosmic Quad For Your Viewing Delight"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. And mark this weekend but especially Monday the 16th and Tuesday the 17th as the time to go out just after it gets dark out to see four objects all close together for your viewing delight. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for any night this week just after it gets dark out facing west where we'll pay attention to a triangle of objects which will be joined by a 4th next Monday. Directly in front of you you'll see the second planet from the Sun still at its brightest for this appearance as the evening star, planet #2, 8,000 mile wide Venus. And remember the reason it's so incredibly bright is not just because it's so close but because it is also the most reflective of all the planets because it is entirely enshrouded by bright white clouds which make it act like a mirror reflecting enormous quantities of sunlight back to us.

Now just above it, to its right, is a much dimmer object which although intrinsically much, much bigger and more impressive than Venus is dim only because it is much farther away. It is a very hot, blue white star, and a whopping 4 million miles wide which makes it over 4 times as wide as our own almost million mile wide Sun. Its name is Regulus and it marks the heart of one of the most ancient constellations in written history, Leo the Lion. Finally, completing our triangle is planet #6 which I always think of as the most beautiful planet in our solar system, 75,000 mile wide ringed Saturn. Although if we counted the distance from one edge of Saturn's ring system to the other the distance would actually be 175 thousand miles which means we could line up 22 Earths side by side from one edge of Saturn's rings system to the other. Wow!

So there you have it, three objects, two planets and one star making a lovely triangle in early evening skies. But ta da! If you go out next Monday July 16th just after dark you will see these three joined by an exquisite crescent Moon and the entire picture will absolutely knock your socks off, especially if you contemplate what you're really seeing, because although they will look huddled together, they are in fact separated in space by incredible distances. Indeed next Monday our 2,000 mile wide Moon will be only 241,000 miles away from Earth whereas 8,000 mile wide Venus will be 39 million miles away. And Saturn will be an incredible, almost one billion miles away! Regulus on the other hand, visually the dimmest, although intrinsically the brightest, will be a whopping 468 trillion miles away! Don't miss this foursome please! But if you do, on Tuesday the 17th the crescent Moon will be just beyond the cosmic trio and will form yet another exquisite cosmic quad. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


 

Star Gazer Minute

#07-28 M

7/09/2007 thru 7/15/2007

"The Moon And Saturn, Venus And Regulus:
A Cosmic Quad For Your Viewing Delight"

Horkheimer: This week you can see a super cosmic threesome and next Monday a fabulous foursome. After dark face west and you'll see an exquisite triangle of objects. The brightest is planet #2, 8,000 mile wide Venus, and just above it the 4 million mile wide star Regulus which marks the heart of Leo the Lion, plus planet #6, 75,000 mile wide Saturn. But, ta da! next Monday they'll be joined by an exquisite crescent Moon which will be only 241,000 miles away. Venus will be 39 million miles away, Saturn almost one billion miles away and Regulus a whopping 468 trillion miles away! A truly fabulous foursome! Keep looking up!


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Wednesday 6/20/07 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0727, 0728, 0729, 0730, 0731

Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 07-29 / 1545th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 7/16/2007 through Sunday 7/22/2007

"The King Of The Planets Visits My Favorite Summer Star And Constellation"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Every summer in late July my favorite summer star and constellation reach their highest points above the horizon just after dark. And this year they are joined by the king of the planets Jupiter. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for any night in late July just after dark which is about 9 to 10 p.m. depending on where you live. And if you face due south you'll see a pattern of bright stars shaped like a giant fish hook or the capital letter J. It's my favorite summer constellation Scorpius the scorpion and it contains my favorite summer star Antares which marks his heart if you imagine the scorpion looking something like this. And not only is Antares in the right place for a scorpion's heart but it's also the right color, red. And the reason it's my favorite summer star is because it's the biggest star we can see in summer's skies. In fact it is 700 times wider than our own almost one million mile wide Sun. So huge we could fit 350 million Suns inside it. Or if you like to think of it this way, it is so gigantic that if we placed one edge of it where our Sun is it would reach out past the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars even beyond the orbit of Jupiter. Wow!

And speaking of Jupiter this summer the king of the planets of our solar system is paying a visit to Antares although its 88,000 mile wide diameter makes it absolutely puny by comparison. Indeed Antares is so huge we could fit over 317 trillion Jupiters inside it. And keep in mind that even though Jupiter and Antares look close to each other it's just an illusion because while Jupiter is only 425 million miles away from us this week, Antares is a whopping 8.3 million times farther away, 600 light years beyond. Or if you like to think of it this way, while it takes only 38 minutes for the light from Jupiter to reach us this week, it takes 600 years for the light from Antares to reach us! Which means that when we look at Antares we see it not as it exists now but as it existed 600 years ago, just before the invention of the printing press. Wow!

Now if you look at Scorpius on a night when there's no Moon out and you're far from city lights you will notice that the bottom half of Scorpius, including all of its stinger is located in that faint ribbon of light we call the Milky Way. And if you have really good eyesight or a pair of binoculars you will see two fuzzy clouds just above the stinger. They're called M-6 and M-7 and they're wonderful. Indeed M-7 is a cluster of 80 stars about 800 light years away which means that the light we see right now is the light that left it in 1200 A.D. M-6 likewise has 80 stars in it but it is 1600 light years away which means that the light we see now left it in 400 A.D. Wow!, again. So there you have it, Scorpius the scorpion and his emperor of a star visited by our king of the planets just begging to be seen. So go out and see them. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.

 


 

Star Gazer Minute

#07-29 M

7/16/2007 thru 7/22/2007

"The King Of The Planets Visits
My Favorite Summer Star And Constellation"

Horkheimer: Right now the king of the planets is visiting my favorite summer star and constellation. Around 9 to 10 p.m. face south and you'll see the giant fishhook shaped pattern of stars Scorpius the scorpion with my favorite summer star , ruby red Antares marking his heart. A star 700 times wider than our own million mile wide Sun, so huge we could fit 350 million suns inside it. And this year it is being visited by our king of the planets 88,000 mile wide Jupiter which is super puny by comparison. In fact we could fit over 317 trillion Jupiters inside Antares. Wow! So get thee out and see our so called king of the planets parked next to a super emperor of a star. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Wednesday 6/20/07 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0727, 0728, 0729, 0730, 0731

Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 07-30 / 1546th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 7/23/2007 through Sunday 7/29/2007

"The Cat On The Scorpion's Tail"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Although the night skies are loaded with constellations named after animals not one of them is named after aAmerica's favorite household pet, the pussy cat. However to compensate for this obvious negligence every summer two marvelous cat's eyes glide across summer's skies and in the most improbable of places, on the tail of a scorpion. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for any night in July and august from after dark to midnight where if you look toward the south you will see summer's biggest constellation Scorpius the scorpion. It's one of the few constellations, which actually looks like its name. It even has a red star where its heart should be named Antares, a humongous star 700 times wider than our own Sun which this year is joined by our king of the planets, although puny by comparison, 88,000 mile wide Jupiter.

Now if you look closely you can see how Scorpius' rather nasty tail curves up and back on itself just like a real scorpion's with two stars marking its poisonous stinger. Their Arabic names from left to right are Shaula and Lesath. And these names mean "the sting". In folk legend however, they are not only "the sting" but are also the two eyes of an ancient celestial cat, which stare out at us every single summer.

Now although they don't appear to be all that exceptional to the naked eye, if we look deeper into these cat's eyes with a telescope we can see the secrets they have hidden within them for thousands of years, wonderful secrets because when we compare each star to our Sun they are truly marvelous. Indeed while our Sun is about a million miles wide, Shaula is almost twice as wide. And it is a much hotter star than our yellow Sun and burns a fierce blue-white and is in fact 1200 times more luminous. It looks dimmer only because it is 280 light years away, which means that we see Shaula not as it exists now this summer but as it existed when its light left it 280 years ago in the early 1700's.

Lesath, the dimmer of the two, is even more incredible and appears dimmer only because it is over 5 times farther away than Shaula, 1600 light years beyond which means that we see it not as it exists now but as it existed 1600 years ago around 400 A.D. And it burns an even fiercer blue-white hot than Shaula and is 15,000 times brighter than our Sun, plus Lesath makes both Shaula and our Sun seem puny by comparison because it is 2 1/2 times the diameter of Shaula and 7 times as wide as our Sun. Some pussy cat eh folks?

So get thee outside the next few weeks and find these two magical cat's eyes peering through summer nights as they silently glide across the southern sky masquerading as the sting of the scorpion. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


 

Star Gazer Minute

#07-30 M

7/23/2007 thru 7/29/2007

"The Cat On The Scorpion's Tail"

Horkheimer: Although there is no constellation named for a pussy cat there are two cat's eyes in summer's skies. Look south for the fishhook shaped pattern of stars Scorpius the scorpion and you'll see two stars which mark his stinger. Named Shaula and Lesath in ancient times these two were known as the cat's eyes. Shaula which is two times as wide as our million mile wide Sun is so far away we see it as it existed 280 years ago. And humongous Lesath which is 7 times as wide as our Sun is so far away we see it as it existed 1600 years ago. So look for these two fabulous cat's eyes as they ride across summer's skies on the tail of the scorpion. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer



STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Wednesday 6/20/07 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0727, 0728, 0729, 0730, 0731

Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 07-31 / 1547thShow

To Be Aired : Monday 7/30/2007 through Sunday 8/05/2007

"Getting Ready For The Perseid Meteor Shower
And Mars' Closest Approach During Christmas Week"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. And have we got two goodies for you to get ready for, the Perseid meteor shower which occurs on the night of August 12th and morning of August 13th and the closest approach of the planet Mars during Christmas week. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for about 3 a.m. Monday morning August 13th facing northeast and if you have clear and very dark skies and are far from city lights you can expect to see a couple of dozen Perseid meteors per hour until dawn. And I encourage you to make the effort this year because there will be no Moonlight whatsoever to wipe out the faintest of meteors because it will be time of the new Moon. And new Moon means no Moon. So if you want to see some Perseid meteors this shower get as far from city lights as possible and relax in a lawn chair or sleeping bag and hang out until dawn. Now you have a better chance of seeing more meteors from around 3 a.m. until dawn because then the night side of our Earth is facing more directly into the meteor stream called the Perseids, however you'll probably see a few Perseids even before midnight Sunday night the 12th. So if you want to pull an all nighter go out about 11 p.m. Sunday night and hang out until dawn.

And while you're out there if you look due east between 4 and 5 a.m. you'll see not only the lovely star cluster the Seven Sisters but parked just to the right of it the 4th planet from the Sun, 4,000 mile wide Mars. And I suggest starting your Mars watch either on the morning of your Perseid meteor watch or even now. Although if you need a little help finding Mars, on Monday August 6th you can use an exquisite crescent Moon parked above it which will form a triangle with Mars and the Seven Sisters. Or you can go out Tuesday August 7th and the Moon will be even closer to Mars and form yet a different triangle with Mars and the Seven Sisters. Now the reason I want you to start looking for Mars now is because it is racing closer and closer to our planet for a super close and very bright meeting during Christmas week of this year. In fact whereas Mars will be 120 million miles away on Monday and Tuesday August 6th and 7th, it will be 65 million miles closer on Christmas Eve, only 55 million miles away! And in fact will be an astonishing 7 times brighter than it is right now!

And in case you'd like a preview of winter's stars, well all you have to do is look below Mars and the Seven Sisters between 4 and 5 a.m. and you will see that winter's most famous constellation Orion the Hunter is rising just above the horizon. Three stars mark his belt, two bright stars mark his shoulders and two more bright stars mark his knees. So you can experience a little bit of Christmas in August, at least cosmic-wise because every August before sunrise Orion starts to make his presence known over the eastern horizon. So start your Mars Christmas watch now and get ready for the Perseids on August 12th and 13th. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#07-31 M

7/30/2007 thru 8/05/2007

"Getting Ready For The Perseid Meteor Shower
And Mars' Closest Approach During Christmas Week"

Horkheimer: Start your Mars watch now and get ready for the Perseid meteor shower. Starting about 3 a.m. Monday August 13th face northeast and if you're far from city lights and you watch until dawn you'll have a chance to see several Perseid meteors. At 4 a.m. look east and you'll see a star cluster called the Seven Sisters and 4,000 mile wide Mars which is racing toward planet Earth for its closest approach during Christmas week when it will be seven times brighter than it is right now. In fact while Mars is now 120 million miles away it will be 65 million miles closer on Christmas Eve. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


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