STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512

6/25/99 10:30 - 11:00 am Eastern time (4 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from

NASA CORE

A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00

plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard,

check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address

below:

 

Lorain County JVS - NASA CORE

15181 Route 58 South

Oberlin, OH 44074

440/775-1400

FAX 440/775-1460

nasaco@leeca.esu.k12.oh.us

http://spacelink.nasa.gov/CORE

 

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


STAR GAZER

Episode # 99-27

1126th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 7/5/99 through

Sunday 7/11/99

"Don't Miss July 15th's Super Duper Spectacular Cosmic Trio!

A Real Knock-Your-Socks-Off Sky Show!"


Horkheimer: Greetings Greetings, fellow star gazers and right now I want you to burn in your brain the following date Thursday July 15th because on that evening after sunset you will see an outrageously spectacular trio of cosmic objects all huddled together in the western sky, in an arrangement you will never forget. Let me show you. O.K., to get ready for Thursday night first go out this Sunday night July 11th, just after sunset, face west, and you will see an absolutely brilliant Venus and just above it Regulus, the brightest star of the constellation Leo the lion. Now this night itself is very, very special because this Sunday July 11th, Venus and Regulus will be at their very closest for the entire year! And closer in fact than they'll be until Sept. 20th, 2001. Indeed Venus and Regulus will be only one and two tenths degrees apart.

However, keep in mind that even though they appear at their closest this Sunday night nothing could be farther from the truth. The only reason Venus appears so bright is because it is so close to us, only 41 million miles away Sunday night. In fact, it is not even very big cosmically speaking as it is only a planet within our own solar system, the same size as our planet Earth 8,000 miles wide. Regulus on the other hand is dimmer only because it is so much farther away 72 light years distant that's 10 1/2 million times farther away than Venus. In fact, if it were the same size as Venus we couldn't even see it with the Hubble Telescope. It's only because it is such a humongously big and bright star that we can see it at all. Indeed, it is 182 times as wide as Venus, 1 1/2 million miles wide and is 140 times as bright as our own Sun. And although they appear closest Sunday night it's simply an optical illusion.

Now by Monday night July 12th they'll be a little bit farther apart and on Tuesday night even farther still. By Wednesday night they'll be twice as far apart as they were on Sunday. But Ta! Da! on Wednesday July 14th Venus will be at its greatest brilliancy for the entire year! 16 times brighter than the brightest star. And if you look immediately after sunset near the horizon you may see an exquisite slender sliver of a waxing crescent Moon. But the big night is the next night Thursday July 15th right after sunset when you'll see not only Venus at its greatest brilliancy and beside it giant Regulus, but also an even more exquisite crescent Moon will hover just above them forming a trio of cosmic objects you will never forget. Don't miss this please.

It's something you just have to see for yourself. You see by Friday night July 16th the crescent Moon will have moved far up and to the left of Venus and Regulus and the incredible trio effect will have disappeared overnight. Wow! What a week! Sunday the 11th Venus and Regulus are at their absolute closest for the year, Wednesday the 14th, Venus is at its greatest brilliancy and on Thursday the 15th a cosmic trio that will knock your socks off. This is one week my friends when you absolutely must remember to Keep Looking Up!

For graphics for this script (Click) Here


Star Gazer Minute

#99-27 M

7/5/99 thru 7/11/99

"Super Duper Cosmic Trio"

 

Horkheimer: Greetings if you want to see an absolutely spectacular cosmic trio go outside next Thursday July 15th just after sunset and look west and there you'll see planet Venus and the brightest star of Leo the Lion, Regulus, and an exquisite young crescent Moon all huddled close together. But close they're not. Indeed, this is only a grand cosmic illusion because the 2,000 mile wide Moon will be 235,000 miles away Thursday night, whereas 8,000 mile wide Venus will be 41 million miles away. But 1 1/2 million mile wide Regulus will be 72 light years away. That's 10 1/2 million times farther away than Venus. But from good old planet Earth they will look as close as peas in a pod. I'm Jack Horkheimer reminding you to Keep Looking Up!

For graphics for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of

 

To Subscribe

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* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512

6/25/99 10:30 - 11:00 am Eastern time (4 shows)


 

Star Gazer is also available from

NASA CORE

A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00

plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard,

check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address

below:

 

Lorain County JVS - NASA CORE

15181 Route 58 South

Oberlin, OH 44074

440/775-1400

FAX 440/775-1460

nasaco@leeca.esu.k12.oh.us

http://spacelink.nasa.gov/CORE





Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #99-28


1127th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 7/12/99 through Sunday 7/18/99

"How To Watch Two Bright Planets and

Two Bright Stars As They Move

Away From Each Other"


Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers and if you happen to be watching this show early in the week let me once again remind you about the absolutely super spectacular cosmic trio that occurs this week, Thursday night July 15th. Let me show you. O.K., We've got our skies set up for Thursday evening July 15th about one hour after sunset and if you look to the west no one will even have to tell you that what you're seeing is indeed spectacular. Because you will see Venus at its greatest evening brilliancy for the entire year huddled right next to Regulus the brightest star of Leo the Lion and above the two a simply exquisite crescent Moon, a cosmic trio you'll never forget.

Now if you're watching this show after Thursday night the 15th, you'll still see a wonderful sky picture Friday the 16th of a crescent Moon up to the left of Venus. And Regulus and throughout the following week you'll be able to watch Venus and Regulus slowly pull apart from each other as Venus still remains at its greatest evening brilliancy for the entire year. And let me just show you how quickly some sky objects change their positions in the heavens. Now last Sunday night July 11th Venus and Regulus were only one degree apart which means we could have fit only two full Moons between them but by this Sunday the 18th they will have pulled so far apart that we could fit 8 full Moons between them because they'll be 4 degrees apart. Remember one full Moon is 1/2 a degree wide.

Now you can continue watching Venus and Regulus pull farther and farther apart night after night. Indeed by next Wednesday July 21st they'll be 5 degrees or 10 full Moons apart. By Sunday the 25th they'll be 6 1/2 degrees or 13 full Moons apart. Just imagine in only 2 weeks time from Sunday July 11th when they were only 2 full Moons apart, they have moved so rapidly away from each other that by Sunday the 25th 13 full Moons could be placed between them.

And speaking of Moons you can use the waxing Moon next Monday and Tuesday night to make sure you've found another planet and star, Mars and Spica. Let me show you. O.K., We've got our skies set up for next Monday night one hour after sunset looking south - south west where you'll see a beautiful not quite first quarter Moon hovering just above Spica the brightest star of Virgo. And just up and to its left you'll see yellowish gold planet Mars. On the next night Tuesday the 20th the first quarter Moon will be directly above Mars. Now as many of you may recall Mars and Spica are also pulling away from each other just like Venus and Regulus. But because Mars is so much farther away from Earth than Venus, it moves much more slowly among the stars.

Indeed back on June 8th when Mars and Spica were at their closest we could have fit only 3 full Moons between them. But 6 weeks later on Tuesday night July 20th they'll be 24 full Moon widths apart. So it takes Mars almost twice as long to move the same distance away from a star as Venus. So there you have it 2 planets and 2 stars pulling away from each other at different speeds all reminding us that the heavens are indeed complex but wonderful to behold if you remember to Keep Looking Up!

For graphics for this script (Click) Here


Star Gazer Minute

#99-28 M

7/12/99 thru 7/18/99

"Two Planets and Two Stars"

 

Horkheimer: Greetings, you know for the past few weeks we've been watching two planets come closer and closer to two bright stars and although Venus and Regulus were at their closest on Sunday night, they're still very close and absolutely exquisite in the western sky for about one hour after sunset. But by the end of July we'll lose them both. However, we'll be able to watch Mars and Spica which were closest on June 8th and which you can still observe as they slowly pull apart over the next month and a half. So say farewell to spectacular Venus and the heart of the lion, Regulus and set your sights on Mars and the brightest star of Virgo, Spica. I'm Jack Horkheimer reminding you to Keep Looking Up!

For graphics for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of

 

To Subscribe

(only $26.95 for 9 issues)

contact

'ODYSSEY'

30 Grove Street

Suite C

Peterborough, NH 03458

or Click Here




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512

6/25/99 10:30 - 11:00 am Eastern time (4 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from

NASA CORE

A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00

plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard,

check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address

below:

 

Lorain County JVS - NASA CORE

15181 Route 58 South

Oberlin, OH 44074

440/775-1400

FAX 440/775-1460

nasaco@leeca.esu.k12.oh.us

http://spacelink.nasa.gov/CORE




Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 99-29


1128th Show


To Be Aired : Monday 7/19/99 through Sunday 7/25/99

"The Scorpion and The Pussycat and

How To Find Them!"
 

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers. You know when it came to creating star patterns, what we call the constellations, our ancestors had quite vivid imaginations and put all kinds of mythic heroes and heroines in the heavens along with all sorts of animals like sea serpents and dragons, lions and bears, wolves and dogs, eagles and snakes, swans and unicorns and so on. But how often have you heard anyone mention a cosmic pussy cat? Most likely never. But believe it or not, there really is a pussy cat in the cosmos which you can see every summer. And I'm gonna show you how to find it easy as pie.

O.K., We've got our skies set up for any night in July and August between sunset and midnight and if you look over toward the south you'll see one of the most famous constellations of summer, Scorpius the Scorpion which is one of the few constellations which looks exactly like his name. Even a humongous red star Antares 700 times wider than our own Sun marks the spot right where his heart should be. And with no difficulty at all you can see how his rather nasty tail curves around up and back on itself like a real scorpion's with two stars marking the stinger.

Their arabic names from left to right are Shaula and Lesath, Shaula being the brightest. And these names actually mean "the sting". In folk legend however they are not only the sting but also the two eyes of an ancient celestial cat. So in addition to marking "the sting", Shaula and Lesath double as "the cat's eyes". And they stare out at us every single summer year after year. Now although to the naked eye they don't appear to be all that exceptional, if we look deeper into these cat's eyes with telescopic eyes we can discover the secrets they have hidden from the eyes of man for thousands of years.

Indeed, Shaula the brighter one is almost 2 times the diameter of our own Sun, almost 2 million miles wide. But it is a much hotter star than our yellow Sun and burns a fierce blue white. In fact it is over 12 hundred times more luminous. And because it is 280 light years away from us we are seeing Shaula not as it exists now this summer but as it looked when its light left it 280 years ago. But our pussy cat's dimmer eye Lesath has kept an even more marvelous secret over the eons. Indeed, the only reason it appears dimmer to us is because it is over 5 times farther away than Shaula, 1600 light years beyond. Which means we are seeing it not as it exists now this summer but as it existed 1600 years ago. And would you believe it burns an even fiercer blue-white than Shaula and outshines our Sun 15,000 times.

Indeed Lesath makes both our Sun and Shaula seem small by comparison for it is 2 1/2 times the diameter of Shaula and 7 times as wide as our Sun. Some pussy cat hey folks? So get thee outside sometime this summer and find our cosmic pussy cat, our kitty in the cosmos , two cat's eyes peering through the summer night riding across the heavens on the sting of the scorpion. Isn't it fun to Keep Looking Up?

For graphics for this script (Click) Here

 


Star Gazer Minute

#99-29 M

7/19/99 thru 7/25/99

"The Cosmic Pussy Cat and How To Find It"

 

Horkheimer: Greetings, you know our ancestors named star patterns after all kinds of animals, lions and bears, eagles and swans, wolves and dogs and so forth. But have you ever heard of a cosmic pussy cat? Well, you can find it every summer. Just look south before midnight for a fish hook shaped pattern of stars called Scorpius the Scorpion. And the two stars that mark the scorpion's stinger are also known as the cat's eyes. Shaula, the brighter one, is twice the size of our sun. Dimmer Lesath, the other eye, is 5 times farther away than Shaula and is 7 times the size of our Sun. Some pussy cat, eh folks? I' m Jack Horkheimer reminding you to Keep Looking Up!

For graphics for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of

 

To Subscribe

(only $26.95 for 9 issues)

contact

'ODYSSEY'

30 Grove Street

Suite C

Peterborough, NH 03458

or Click Here


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512

6/25/99 10:30 - 11:00 am Eastern time (4 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE

A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00

plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard,

check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address

below:

 

Lorain County JVS - NASA CORE

15181 Route 58 South

Oberlin, OH 44074

440/775-1400

FAX 440/775-1460

nasaco@leeca.esu.k12.oh.us

http://spacelink.nasa.gov/CORE



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

 

STAR GAZER

Episode #99-30


1129th Show



To Be Aired : Monday 7/26/99 through Sunday 8/1/99

"A Moon Journey Past Cosmic Wonders

In Early Morning Skies"

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers. You know usually I talk about stargazing in early evening and while the star gazing has really been good this summer in early evening, right now the star gazing in early morning is equally as good, let me show you. O.K., we've got our skies set up for the beginning of next week, Monday August 2nd between 5 and 6 a.m. facing east and if you look just above the eastern horizon you may be astonished to see the most famous constellation not of summer but of winter, Orion the Hunter just rising above the horizon. because, believe it or not, every year in August Orion starts to make his appearance in eastern skies just before sunrise as a sort of teasing preview of winter. Kind of a cosmic way of letting you know that even though we're getting ready for the hottest weather of the year, August's dog days, nevertheless, things will eventually cool off.

Also surprising to many people at this time of year is that right above Orion we can see the autumn constellation of Taurus the Bull with its bright red star Aldebaran, plus riding on the shoulder of Taurus, the Seven Sisters, the Pleiades, a cosmic reminder that autumn is just around the corner. But this year's August morning early skies have the two largest planets of them all announcing that they will soon be taking center stage in early evening in just a couple of months from now because just to the right of the Pleiades is the second largest planet, 75 thousand mile wide Saturn, and up and to Saturn's right is the king of the planets 88 thousand mile wide Jupiter.

Now in case you need a little extra help finding cosmic objects, you can use the Moon as a finder next week. So simply find the Moon on Monday morning August 2nd and take a ride with it the next few days because on Tuesday morning August 3rd the Moon will be to the right of Jupiter and just about as far from Jupiter as Jupiter is from Saturn and Saturn is from the 7 Sisters. What could be simpler? On the next morning, Wednesday August 4th, the Moon will be almost directly underneath good old Jupiter and not quite half way between Jupiter and Saturn, the 3 forming a lovely trio. Don't miss this!

But the Moon moves so quickly that by the next morning Thursday August 5th, it will have scooted beyond Saturn, shrinking in size as it goes and will be just about the same distance away from Saturn as Saturn is from the 7 Sisters. On Friday morning August 6th however, the Moon will have bid a fond farewell to Saturn and will be huddled up next to the giant red star which marks the eye of the Bull, Aldebaran. and finally on Saturday and Sunday you'll see an exquisite crescent Moon hovering beautifully northeast of Orion.

Once again, and let's draw a line, the path the Moon takes, Monday August 2nd, Tuesday August 3rd, and ta da! Wednesday the 4th, a trio of the Moon, Jupiter and Saturn, Thursday August 5th, and Friday August 6th, a meeting of the Moon and Aldebaran. So get thee out one hour before the sun rises, to see the wonders of the early morning cosmos, which is easy if you just get up and Keep Looking Up!

 

For graphics for this script (Click) Here


Star Gazer Minute

#99-30 M

7/26/99 thru 8/1/99

"Early Morning Summer Wonders"

 

Horkheimer: Greetings, did you know that in the hot dog days of August you can actually see winter stars plus the two largest planets? Just go out any morning next week about an hour before sunrise, look due east and there you'll see winter's Orion the Hunter just peeking over the horizon, sending us a cosmic message that in a few months time he'll drive summer's heat away. Directly above him you can see autumn's 7 Sisters, and this year, to their right, 75,000 mile wide Saturn and 88,000 mile wide Jupiter. And on Wednesday morning, August 4th, they'll form an exquisite cosmic trio with a beautiful last quarter Moon. It may be summer but the planets and stars of this autumn and winter are already on their way. I'm Jack Horkheimer reminding you to Keep Looking Up!

For graphics for this script (Click) Here

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of

 

To Subscribe

(only $26.95 for 9 issues)

contact

'ODYSSEY'

30 Grove Street

Suite C

Peterborough, NH 03458

or Click Here


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only
Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer



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