STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

5/26/2000 10:30 - 11:00 am Eastern time (4 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


STAR GAZER

Episode # 00-23 /1174th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 6/5/2000 through Sunday 6/11/2000

"A Jupiter-Saturn Alert and

The Wonderful Full Moon Of June"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and although I told you about them last week, I simply must remind you about the incredible meeting between the 2 largest planets going on right now. Let me show you: O.K. we've got our skies set up for this weekend, Saturday June 10th and Sunday June 11th just before sunrise looking east and if you have a clear, flat, unobstructed horizon you'll be able to see 75 thousand mile wide Saturn and 88 thousand mile wide Jupiter snuggled up side by side, so close that after the middle of this month you won't see them this close together again for another 20 years until December 21st, 2020. And remember that although they look very close to each other, nothing could be farther from the truth because they're actually half a billion miles away from each other. Now if you go out this week and the first part of next week and look west just after sunset you'll also be able to see tiny 3,000 mile wide, first planet out from the sun, the pink iron planet Mercury in one of its best showings of the year. But look now because by the 3rd week of June it'll be gone.

And now for something really easy to see let's turn our attention to one of the most exquisite full moons of the year, the full moon closest to the Summer Solstice, the first day of summer, and this year that full moon is really close to the first day of summer because the first day of summer occurs next Tuesday the 20th and the full moon occurs only 4 days earlier, Friday the 16th. Now the reason the full moon closest to the summer solstice is so special is because it takes the lowest path across the sky of any full moon of the year and whenever a full moon is not too high above the horizon it looks bigger and more colorful than usual. You see whenever the moon is close to the horizon we always view it through the thicker layers of the earth's dusty atmosphere so a low riding full moon almost always looks more colorful than a full moon that's riding high. And the full moon closest to the summer solstice always takes the lowest path across the sky.

Now an easy way to remember which moon rides the lowest and which rides the highest is this: On the 1st day of summer, the Summer Solstice, the sun always takes its highest path across the sky but the full moon is just the opposite, it takes the lowest. Conversely on the Winter Solstice, the first day of winter, the sun takes its lowest path across the sky but the full moon takes its highest so we can safely predict that the full moon closest to the first day of winter will usually be less colorful than the full moon closest to the first day of summer. In fact, it has been suggested that the term honeymoon may have its origins in the fact that the full moon of June often looks honey-colored because it never gets very high above the horizon and June is traditionally a month of many marriages. At any rate make sure to see Jupiter and Saturn at their closest in 20 years before sunrise, get a glimpse of Mercury just after sunset and on Friday the 16th watch the honey moon of June as it slowly travels across the sky from sunset to sunrise. It's fun if you just remember to Keep Looking Up!

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 


Star Gazer Minute

#00-23 M

6/5/2000 thru 6/11/2000

"A Planetary Alert"

 

Horkheimer: If you haven't done so already please, please look east every morning, an hour before sunrise, for the next two weeks where you'll see the two largest planets, Jupiter and Saturn huddled closer together than they will be until December 21st of the year 2020 because by the end of the month they will be more than twice as far apart from each other. And if you look west just after sunset from now until the end of next week you'll still have an opportunity to see the first planet out from the sun, the tiny pink planet which is made almost entirely out of iron, Mercury. See these three planets now at their very best. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For graphics for this script (Click) Here

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer








STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

5/26/2000 10:30 - 11:00 am Eastern time (4 shows)


 

Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #00-24 / 1175th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 6/12/2000 through Sunday 6/18/2000

"Day Star Day : A Celebration of The Summer Solstice

And The Star We Call Our Sun"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers, and once again we're going to ask you to participate in something which the majority of people on this planet have never really experienced. We are going to prepare you for the dramatic rising of a great star over our Earth's horizon ... a star so huge that we could fit one million three hundred thousand Earth's inside it ... a star whose surface temperature is over 10 thousand degrees Fahrenheit. Yes, we are going to as you to observe the rising of the closest star to our Earth, the only star we can see in the daytime, the star we call our Sun. A star which would be better named our Day Star. And once again we have chosen the 1st day of summer, the Summer Solstice which this year is Tuesday, June 20th,as Day Star Day.

But, many of you are undoubtedly thinking, "You're talking about a sunrise, and I've seen thousands of sunrises in my life." And yes, I am talking about a sunrise. But believe it or not, the majority of the people on this planet have never truly experienced a sunrise, especially in our high tech society. Oh yes, there are millions of you out there who get up at the crack of dawn to get ready for a day's work, farmers starting their chores, commuters catching their trains or jamming the expressways as the sun slowly creeps over the horizon, but that is not experiencing a sunrise because to most people sunrise is a peripheral event and not the center of attention. So that's why we have set aside this day so you can experience one of the grandest events in nature ... an experience which may change the way you view the world forever.

To participate here's all you have to do: Simply mark Tuesday, June 20th as the day when you'll get up 15 minutes before twilight begins, while its still dark out. And whether you live in the heart of a city or out in the country makes no difference because it's not the sun itself that you are going to observe when it rises. You are going to observe the effects of sunrise on everything all around you as night slowly turns into day. Of course, it's best if you can be outside, but if not just sit by a window. And now for the rules which are absolutely essential: no radio, no television, no doing your normal wake up routine, all distractions must be eliminated. Simply sit quietly and when you see the sky slowly start to brighten, look and listen and feel what happens all around you because a sunrise is not just visual. Indeed, you will hear the sounds of the world and its creatures waking up. You'll feel the wind change, the temperature change and much, much more as night slowly slips in to day.

Keep track of all the subtle changes you notice and record your observations either on paper or into a tape recorder. And then play back your tape or read what you've written a few days later. Believe me, if you've never done this before you're in for a pleasant surprise because really experiencing the effects of a sunrise, using all of your senses and your full attention is one of the most wonderful and seldom experienced experiences this planet has to offer, and one of nature's best reasons to Keep Looking Up!


For graphics for this script (Click) Here


For graphics for this script (Click) Here

 


Star Gazer Minute

#00-24 M

6/12/2000 thru 6/18/2000

"Day Star Day"

 

Horkheimer: Every year on the first day of summer we ask everyone to celebrate Day Star Day by watching our own local star, the Sun, rise over the horizon. You see, most of us never fully experience a sunrise with all its wonder so we ask you to get up before twilight begins and observe the effects of sunrise on everything all around you as night turns into day. No radio, no television allowed. Listen to all the sounds of nature as our earth wakes up. Feel the wind, the temperature and the air change and watch not the the sun itself but the incredible changes of light, shadow and color. Record your observations on paper or into a tape recorder and you'll be absolutely amazed at what you've missed by not fully experiencing a sunrise before. It's wonderful. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For graphics for this script (Click) Here


For graphics for this script (Click) Here

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

5/26/2000 10:30 - 11:00 am Eastern time (4 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 00-25/ 1176th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 6/19/2000 through Sunday 6/25/2000

"A Great Celestial Triangle Announces

The Beginning of Summer

And Your Last Chance To See

Jupiter and Saturn This Close Until 2020"
 

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and summer is upon us once again. In fact, this week, Tuesday the 20th, Summer began precisely at 9:48 p.m., Eastern Daylight Time when our sun reached its highest point in its annual path across the heavens and was farthest north of the celestial equator for a brief moment, after which , of course, it will slowly move southward day by day until it reaches its lowest point, its farthest point south of the celestial equator 6 months from now on the first day of winter. So enjoy these days of longest daylight this week because winter is only 6 months away. And if you want more cosmic proof that summer is here then all you have to do is go outside just after it gets dark out and look east because every year during the first week of summer a trio of brilliant stars announce the arrival of summer with their appearance just above the eastern horizon. Let's take a closer look.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for any night the next couple of weeks just after it gets dark out, where close to the horizon you will see 3 brilliant stars which if we could draw lines between them, would form a gigantic triangle which we call the great Summer Triangle. And every year during the first week of summer, just like clockwork you will see these three stars hanging above the horizon like a great cosmic announcement that summer is about to begin. The brightest is the star Vega in the tiny constellation Lyra the Harp. The second brightest is Altair in the constellation Aquila the Eagle and the third brightest is Deneb, the tail star of the magnificent Cygnus the Swan, also known as the Northern Cross. Now if you go out once a week at the same time all summer long you will notice that this great triangle will slowly climb higher and higher and by mid-September on the first day of autumn it will be just past the zenith announcing that summer is over and a new season has begun. So make the Summer Triangle one of your constant companions for the next few months and watch it rise higher in the heavens as the weeks slip by.

And now, if you go out about one hour before sunrise you will still be able to see the two giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn snuggled side by side. In fact, this week is the last time you'll see them this close until December 21st, 2020. And if you go out every morning after this week you'll be able to watch them slowly pull away from each other. Now at the end of next week you'll enjoy three, perhaps four wonderful sights when an old crescent moon joins them. On Tuesday the 27th a crescent moon will be up to the right of Jupiter and Saturn, but on Wednesday the 28th it will be so close it will take your breath away. On Thursday June 29th an absolutely sensational tiny sliver of a moon will be huddled underneath the two. And if you've got really good eyes, on Friday the 30th, 45 minutes before sunrise you may see an extremely slender sliver hugging the horizon. So get thee out, welcome in summer with the Summer Triangle, and watch a crescent moon visit the two largest planets. It's fun, just Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here



For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 


Star Gazer Minute

#00-25 M

6/19/2000 thru 6/25/2000

"The Summer Triangle Announces

The Beginning Of Summer"

 

Horkheimer: This week summer officially began in the northern hemisphere when our sun reached its highest point above the celestial equator. But there's another cosmic sign which tells us summer has officially begun because if you look east just after it gets dark out you will see three bright stars which mark the points of the great Summer triangle which hovers just above the horizon every year during the first week of summer.And if you go out week after week at the same time you will be able to watch this great Summer Triangle slowly climb higher and higher until the first day of autumn it will be just past overhead announcing summer's end. But it's just beginning its ascent now, and you can watch it all summer long. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here



For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

5/26/2000 10:30 - 11:00 am Eastern time (4 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov




Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #00-26 / 1177th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 6/26/2000 through Sunday 7/2/2000

"A Special Sky For The 4th Of July"

Horkheimer:Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and do we ever have a special sky for you this upcoming 4th of July.Let me show you. O.K., we've got our skies set up for just after sunset,Tuesday July 4th looking west where you will see an exquisite 3 day old crescent moon which will make it a perfect evening for fireworks because there will be no bright first quarter moon or full moon flooding the sky with moonlight. So this year's fireworks will be seen against a dark sky. Plus, if you stay outside after the fireworks around midnight, the summer constellations plus the Milky Way will be at their absolute best.

Simply face south and directly in front of you, you will see two of summer's most wonderful star patterns, one of which looks like a giant fish hook or capital letter 'J'; Scorpius the Scorpion and to its left the brightest stars of Sagittarius which when connected with lines, look like an old fashioned tea pot complete with a spout, lid and handle. And every 4th of July at midnight, if there's no bright moonlight to wipe them out from view, you'll see them just like this at their highest, due south. Scorpius is my absolute favorite of summer because its heart is marked by a brilliant red star named Antares which actually pulsates like a slowly beating heart and whose size is mind-blowing. Indeed, it is 7 hundred times the diameter of our own million mile wide sun. In fact, if we could place one edge of Antares where our sun is, its opposite edge would extend beyond the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, even past Jupiter. Indeed, we could fit over 2 hundred million of our suns inside Antares. Wow!

But even more remarkable, if you look just above the Scorpion's Stinger you will see two dim fuzzy patches of light named M-6 and M-7. And although they don't look like much to the naked eye, if you look at them through binoculars you will see that each of them is a cluster of over 100 super hot blue-white stars much younger than our sun, all born at the same time and huddled together like stellar siblings. But the most awesome spectacle of all awaits you if you are far away from city lights because every 4th of July at midnight you can see a faint ribbon of light running all the way from the due south horizon up through Scorpius and Sagittarius to the very top of the sky itself and back down again through the Summer Triangle and Cassiopeia to the northeast horizon. and this is the Milky Way which is in reality the edge of our galaxy as seen from the inside. It is composed of billion of stars so far away that all their light fuzzes together in a blur.In fact, if you look anywhere along the Milky Way through a pair of binoculars you will see that it is peppered with hundreds of thousands of pin points of light each of which is a distant star, another sun.

So look for a crescent moon before the fireworks and after the fireworks at midnight find the giant heart of the Scorpion with two humongous clusters of stars above its Stinger, and the magnificent Milky Way arching across the roof of heaven. What a great way to celebrate the 4th! Simply remember to Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 


Star Gazer Minute

#00-26 M

6/26/2000 thru 7/2/2000

"A Special Sky For The 4th Of July"

 

Horkheimer: Just after it gets dark out, before the fireworks begin this 4th of July you'll see an exquisite 3 day old crescent moon hovering in the west. But after the fireworks if you're far from city lights you'll see the Milky Way at its absolute best, looking like a faint ribbon of light running all the way from the due south horizon up through Scorpius and Sagittarius to the very top of the sky itself and back down through the Summer Triangle and Cassiopeia to the northeast horizon. And if you have a pair of binoculars you will see that the Milky Way is composed of millions of pinpoints of light, each of which is a distant sun, not unlike our sun. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only
Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer

 



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