STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Tuesday 5/20/08 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0822, 0823, 0824, 0825, 0826


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 08-22 / 1591st Show
To Be Aired : Monday 6/02/2008 through
Sunday 6/08/2008

"Bootes And The Bright Star That Opened
The World's Fair Of 1933"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. All throughout June if you go outside just after it gets dark out and look almost overhead you will see a very bright star which was very famous in the early 20th century because its light was used to open the world's fair in Chicago in 1933. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for the first two weeks of June just after it gets dark out facing north where just to the west of the North Star you will see the seven stars which make up the Big Dipper. Four stars mark its cup and three stars mark its handle. And as all you regular viewers know you can use the handle to find a very bright star. Simply draw a line through the handle and continue that line in the same curve or arc and you'll "arc to Arcturus", which is the brightest star of the constellation Bootes the Herdsman, but whose other stars are less bright than the Big Dipper's and if we draw lines between them would look something like a kite.

Now although astronomers usually call Bootes the Herdsman he is also called the bear driver because some legends say that he chases two celestial bears around the North Star. You see the Big Dipper is part of the constellation Ursa Major the big bear and the Little Dipper is part of the constellation Ursa Minor the little bear. Bootes is also called the plowman because some European cultures see the Big Dipper as a plow and Bootes as the plowman endlessly turning up celestial turf as he steers his plow endlessly circling the north star.

At any rate it's his brightest star Arcturus which was super famous three quarters of a century ago when it was used to open the World's Fair in Chicago. The reasoning behind this was that 40 years earlier in 1893, Chicago had also hosted a world's fair. And astronomers believed that Arcturus was 40 light years away. So someone came up with the bright idea that wouldn't it be nifty if the light of Arcturus, which left it in 1893, could be used to open the world's fair when its light arrived 40 years later in 1933. So a device was set up whereby the rays from Arcturus were passed through a telescope which focused this light onto a photo electric cell which then generated a small electrical current which was then used to turn on the lights of the fair. And it really worked!

Only one problem however, since then we have discovered that Arcturus is a bit closer, 37 light years away. So early 20th century astronomers got it wrong, but only by 3 years, which is pretty good. Arcturus is the 4th brightest star we can see and is 23 times wider than our Sun, a whopping 20 million miles wide. Plus it is 115 times brighter. It is actually speeding toward us and will do so for another couple thousand years. After which however it will speed away from us and fade from sight in only half a million years! So see it now before it disappears out of sight. Keep looking up!

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#08-22 M

6/02/2008 thru 6/08/2008

"Bootes And The Bright Star That Opened
The World's Fair Of 1933"

Horkheimer: Want to know what the 4th brightest star had to do with the 1933 world's fair? Look north just after dark, find the Big Dipper then shoot an arrow through its handle and you'll arc to Arcturus the brightest star of Bootes. It is 20 million miles wide which makes it 23 times wider than our Sun, plus it's 115 times brighter. And in 1933 its light was focused through a telescope onto a photo electric cell which actually turned on the lights and opened the 1933 Chicago World's Fair! It is speeding toward us for the next 2,000 years, after which however it will speed away from us and fade from sight in only half a million years. So see it now, while you can! Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Tuesday 5/20/08 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0822, 0823, 0824, 0825, 0826


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.




STAR GAZER

Episode #08-23 /1592nd Show
To Be Aired : Monday 6/09/2008 through Sunday 6/15/2008

"Celebrate Day Star Day On
Summer Solstice Weekend!"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Every year on the summer solstice we ask you to experience a great star rise over our Earth's horizon. A star so huge we could fit over one and a quarter million Earths inside it. It sounds simple enough but few people ever pay close enough attention to ever really experience the rising of the only star we can see in the daytime, the star we call our Sun, a star I like to call our Day Star.

This year we're suggesting that you celebrate "Day Star Day" on the weekend of the summer solstice and since the summer solstice is Friday June 20th we suggest you celebrate on Friday, Saturday or Sunday. Now I know some of you are thinking that I'm talking about a sunrise and that you've seen thousands of them. But believe it or not although you may have seen thousands of Sunrises very few people have ever taken the time to completely experience what's happening all around them as the Sun rises because sunrise involves a complex series of steps as night slowly turns into dawn and finally into day. And believe me if you follow our simple instructions you will be amazed at what you've missed because you will experience one of the grandest events in nature which most people ignore.

To participate here is all you have to do. Simply get up fifteen minutes before twilight begins while it is still dark out on the day you've chosen and whether you live in the heart of a city or out in the country makes no difference because it's not the Sun itself you're going to observe but the effects of sunrise on everything around you as your part of the world slowly turns from night into day. It is better to be outside but if not just sit by an open window. Now for the rules which are absolutely essential: no radio, no television, no doing your normal wake up routine. All distractions must be eliminated. Simply sit quietly inside or outside and when you see the sky slowly start to brighten look, listen and feel what happens all around you because a Sunrise is more than visual. Watch the delicate interplay of light, color and shadow, but also listen and you will hear the sounds of our world and its creatures waking up. You'll feel the wind change, the temperature change and much, much more. Keep track of all the subtle changes you notice and record your observations on paper or into a voice recorder. Then read or listen to your observations a few days later. Believe me if you've never done this before you'll be absolutely amazed at what a star rise over a small planet can do for you. Of course remember to never look directly at the Sun at any time, only observe its effects. Happy "Daystar Day" and keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#08-23 M

6/09/2008 thru 6/15/2008

"Celebrate Day Star Day On
Summer Solstice Weekend!"

Horkheimer: On this summer solstice weekend June 20, 21, and 22 we invite you to celebrate the rising of our local star the Sun because most people have never really experienced a sunrise. Get up before twilight begins to observe not the Sun itself but the incredible effects of a sunrise on everything all around you. Sit quietly and tune in with all your senses. Listen to the different sounds of nature as our Earth wakes up. Feel the wind and temperature change and watch the delicate interplay of light, color and shadow. Trust me if you've never done this before you'll be amazed at what you've missed and at what a star rise over a small planet can do for you. Keep looking up.


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Tuesday 5/20/08 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0822, 0823, 0824, 0825, 0826


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


STAR GAZER

Episode # 08-24 / 1593rd Show

To Be Aired : Monday 6/16/2008 through Sunday 6/22/2008

"Why Is The First Day Of Summer Called
The Summer Solstice?"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. This Friday June 20th officially marks the first day of summer for the northern hemisphere and is called the summer solstice. But just what is the summer solstice anyway? Well to explain we're going to have to go back in time a bit to the first day of spring.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for the first day of spring which is also called the vernal equinox, vernal meaning green and equinox meaning equal night, which means simply that on the equinox the hours of daylight are equal to the hours of night. Now on the first day of spring, the vernal equinox, the Sun rises exactly due east and sets exactly due west. And on each successive day it will rise and set just a little bit farther to the north until the summer solstice, the first day of summer, when the Sun reaches its northernmost point along the horizon and actually seems to stand still and rise and set almost in the same place for a few days. In fact the word solstice means "Sun stands still" which is exactly what appears to be happening.

And as everyone knows the first day of summer is also the longest day of the year, meaning the day of longest daylight and least night. So that's what the summer solstice is all about. But there is more than one solstice. You see after the summer solstice the Sun will appear to reverse its direction and will rise and set just a little bit farther south each successive day. And each successive day the time of daylight will grow just a little bit shorter until the autumnal equinox the first day of autumn when the Sun will once again rise due east and set due west and the hours of daylight will again be equal to the hours of night.

After which the Sun will continue its journey southward rising and setting a little bit farther south each day and daylight will continue to get shorter and nighttime longer until the first day of winter, the winter solstice, when the Sun will reach its farthest point south and will once again appear to stand still, that is solstice, and rise and set at the same place for a few days. And the northern hemisphere will experience the shortest day of the year meaning the day of least sunlight and most night. Then the Sun will appear to retrace its steps and rise and set just a little bit farther north on the horizon each successive day until once again we'll be back where we started on the vernal equinox the first day of spring when the Sun will rise and set due east and west again, completing a yearly cycle which you yourself like our ancient ancestors can observe if you take the time. So this week why not celebrate summer the really old fashioned astronomical way by watching the Sun rise and set at its northernmost points for the year? It's easy and fun! Simply remember that the Sun like birds goes north for the summer and then like the birds heads south for the winter. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.

 


Star Gazer Minute

#08-24 M

6/16/2008 thru 6/22/2008

"Why Is The First Day Of Summer Called
The Summer Solstice?"

Horkheimer: Friday June 20th is the summer solstice. But just what does that word solstice mean? To find out let's start with the first day of spring, the vernal equinox, when the Sun rises exactly due east. After which it rises a little bit farther north of east each day until it reaches its northernmost point on the first day of summer, which astronomers call the summer solstice when it will appear to stand still and rise in the same place for a few days. The word solstice is Latin and means "the Sun stands still". So this week the Sun will appear to rise at its northernmost point on the horizon for a few days. Check it out for yourself. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Tuesday 5/20/08 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0822, 0823, 0824, 0825, 0826


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 08-25 / 1594th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 6/23/2008 through Sunday 6/29/2008

"A Sky Full Of Wonders For Your 4th of July
Independence Day Week"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. And have we ever got some sky goodies for you not only for the night of the 4th of July but also all next week: the Moon, two planets and a great star just after sunset before the fireworks begin and shortly after midnight the outrageous beauty of the milky way. Let me show you.

We've got our skies set up for next Tuesday July 1st just after dark around 9:30 p.m. Facing due west where you will see three lovely lights just above the horizon: the blue white star Regulus which marks the heart of Leo the Lion and just above it extremely close visually, rouge gold planet Mars. And up to their left the yellowish ringed planet Saturn. I strongly recommend that if you have a small telescope to look at Saturn because its rings never fail to amaze. 24 hours later on Wednesday July 2nd you will notice that Mars has moved a bit farther away from Regulus. And 24 hours later on July 3rd even farther away. But ta da! 24 hours later on Friday night the 4th of July all three will appear equally spaced from one another and in a straight line. And if you have a really clear flat horizon you may see a two day old crescent Moon making its appearance.

But the best is yet to come because on Saturday July 5th a 3 day old crescent Moon complete with earthshine, which will look like a dark full Moon nestled within the crescent, will have moved into such a position that it, Regulus and Mars will appear all lined up in a row and you could even shoot an imaginary straight line through them. Wow! Once again ­ July 1st, July 2nd, July 3rd, July 4th and July 5th. So Independence Day weekend you've got something to see before the fireworks begin but after the fireworks are over you'll also be able to see something absolutely spectacular because there'll be no moonlight out to wipe this wondrous phenomenon from view.

Simply go out between midnight and 1 a.m. and if you're far from city lights you will see a wondrous ribbon of light stretched from the northeast horizon to almost overhead and back down all the way to the southern horizon. It is called the Milky Way and every 4th of July between midnight and 1 a.m. it is stretched across the sky from horizon to horizon. But to see it there can be no moonlight, which is the case this year and you should be as far away from city lights as possible. The Milky Way is the combined light of billions of stars so far away that all their light fuzzes together in a blur. And when we look at it we are actually looking at the plane of our local family of two hundred billion stars, which we call our Milky Way Galaxy. Wow again! So there you have it! Four fabulous objects just after sunset next week and just after midnight the incredible wonder of the Milky Way. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#08-25 M

6/23/2008 thru 6/29/2008

"A Sky Full Of Wonders For Your 4th of July
Independence Day Week"

Horkheimer: This 4th of July weekend you can see two planets and a great star plus the wonderful Milky Way. On Friday night July 4th just after dark face west and you'll see four objects in a row: a crescent Moon, Leo's bright star Regulus, rouge gold Mars and yellowish Saturn. On Saturday the 5th an even bigger crescent Moon will make for a straight four-in-a-row lineup. Wow! Then after midnight because there'll be no Moon out, if you're far from city lights you'll see a wondrous ribbon of light stretched across the sky from north to south. It is called the Milky Way and is the combined light of the billions of stars, which make up our Milky Way galaxy. Have a fabulous 4th and keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer



STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Tuesday 5/20/08 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0822, 0823, 0824, 0825, 0826


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 08-26 / 1595th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 6/30/2008 through Sunday 7/06/2008

"See Mars And Saturn At Their Closest Until 2022!"


HORKHEIMER: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. If you want to see something nifty planetwise mark Wednesday and Thursday July 9th and 10th just after sunset on your calendar as the nights the red planet Mars will be at its closest visually to the ringed planet Saturn until April 3rd, 2022. Plus if you start watching this weekend you'll be able to watch the two of them as they come closer to each other night after night.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this weekend Saturday July 5th just after dark around 9:30 p.m. facing due west where you'll see an exquisite 3 day old crescent Moon which will look like a dark full Moon nestled within the crescent. Then if you draw a line straight up and to its left that line will zip through three celestial objects, the first of which is the brightest star of Leo the Lion, Regulus. The second of which is tiny 4,000 mile wide orange-gold Mars. Followed by the 75,000 mile wide ringed planet Saturn, which just begs you to pick up a small telescope and look at it.

Try to remember how far apart each object is from each other, then go out 24 hours later, Sunday July 6th at 9:30 and you'll notice that the Moon has gotten bigger and has moved up and to the side of Mars and Saturn. But you'll also notice that Mars and Saturn are a little bit closer and that they are just a little bit farther away from Regulus. On the next night Monday July 7th at 9:30 the Moon will be much bigger and way off to the side of these three objects. And Mars and Saturn will be even closer to each other but much farther away from Regulus. On Tuesday July 8th the Moon will be much bigger and much farther away and Mars and Saturn will be much closer and even farther away from Regulus. But then ta da, the real fun begins because on Wednesday July 9th and Thursday July 10th Mars and Saturn will be at their very closest to each other, less than 3/4 of a degree apart! And since a full Moon is only 1/2 a degree wide, this means we could fit only 1 1/2 full Moons between them. Wow! Don't miss this please. And if you have a small telescope or a pair of binoculars I beg you to use them.

Once again start your watch this weekend on Saturday July 5th, Sunday July 6th, Monday July 7th, Tuesday July 8th and ta da! Wednesday and Thursday July 9th and 10th a super close meeting between Mars and Saturn you'll not see again 2022! But even though they look close to each other nothing could be farther from the truth, because as you gaze up at them on Wednesday and Thursday nights, Mars will be only 202 million miles away while Saturn will be 4 1/2 times farther from us, a whopping 929 million miles away! So get thee out for a super sight you'll not see for 14 more years. Is planet gazing fun or what? Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#08-26 M

6/30/2008 thru 7/06/2008

"See Mars And Saturn At Their Closest Until 2022!"

Horkheimer: On July 9th and 10th Mars and Saturn will be at their closest until 2022. On Saturday the 5th just after dark face west and you'll see 4,000 mile wide Mars just below 75,000 mile wide Saturn. On Sunday they'll be a bit closer to each other and on Monday closer still. On Tuesday much closer, but ta da! on Wednesday and Thursday the 9th and 10th they'll be at their very closest, less than 1 degree apart. So close you could just fit 1 and 1/2 full Moons between them. Even more fun with a pair of binoculars watch them each night as they zero in on each other. It's fascinating and it's fun and you'll not see them this close together again for 14 years. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazerj


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