STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half Hour Feed STAH 912
Thursday May 20, 2010, 1130-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 1023, 1024, 1025, 1026


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 10-23 / 1696th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 6/7/2010 through
Sunday 6/13/2010

"Venus And The Moon Make a Lovely Duo
And How To Find Three Planets Lined Up In A Row"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Next Monday night an exquisite crescent Moon will make an exquisite duo with the brightest planet in our solar system. Then throughout the rest of the week will climb up the heavens and float past the brightest star of Leo the Lion and two other planets which with Venus will be lined up in a row. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for next Monday June 14th an hour after sunset facing west. And even if I didn't tell you about it if you happen to be outside anywhere it's clear out and look at the sky you couldn't fail to notice the exquisite beauty of the super bright planet #2, 8,000 mile wide, Earth sized, Venus hovering above a magnificent three day old crescent Moon complete with Earthshine which will look like a greyish black full Moon nestled within the crescent. Don't miss this please because it will take your breath away.

But if you do 24 hours later a slightly fatter crescent Moon will be well past Venus but will still be close enough to attract your attention as a cosmic duo. Wednesday the 16th an even fatter Moon will be below the brightest star of Leo the Lion, blue white Regulus. And just above Regulus you'll see the planet which was only 1 full Moon away from it on June 5 and 6, but which has since moved rapidly on, planet #4, 4,000 mile wide Mars. 24 hours later on Thursday the 17th an almost first quarter Moon will be almost side by side with Mars. And 24 hours later on Friday the 18th the first quarter Moon will hover just below pale yellowish white planet #6, 75,000 mile wide Saturn.

And if you look closely you will notice that Saturn, Mars and Venus are all lined up almost in a perfect row, on a cosmic path called the path of the planets, along which all the planets travel, with Regulus bumped just a little bit to the side. Once again Monday the 14th an exquisite pairing of a three day old Moon and Venus, Tuesday a four day old Moon well past it, on Wednesday a five day old Moon just underneath Regulus and Mars, on Thursday a six day old Moon off to the side of Mars and on Friday a glorious first quarter Moon just below the lord of the rings.

And think of this, on Monday the Moon will be only 226 thousand miles away whereas Venus will be 111 million miles beyond. Mars will be 156 million miles away and Saturn a whopping 874 million miles away, but our heart of the lion Regulus beats them all out because it will be a whopping 468 trillion miles away or as astronomers like to say 78 light years from Earth, which means that while it takes only one and a third seconds for the light from the Moon to reach us, the light from Regulus takes 78 years to reach us, which means that next week we will see Regulus as it existed in the year 1932. Wow! So have fun with the Moon and three planets and the heart of Leo the Lion. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#10-23 M

6/7/2010 thru 6/13/2010

"Venus And The Moon Make a Lovely Duo
And How To Find Three Planets Lined Up In A Row"

Horkheimer: Next week the Moon will pair up with Venus and visit three planets lined up in a row. Next Monday an hour after sunset face west and you'll be blown away by a brilliant crescent Moon and an even more brilliant Venus. Tuesday they'll still look good together and Wednesday the Moon will hang just below Leo's bright star Regulus and rouge gold Mars. Thursday the Moon will be to Mars' left and Friday will hover just below Saturn. And if you look closely you'll see that Saturn, Mars and Venus are lined up almost in a perfect row on what astronomers call the path of the planets along which all the planets travel in their endless journey through the night sky. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Moon hop the planets. And keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half Hour Feed STAH 912
Thursday May 20, 2010, 1130-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 1023, 1024, 1025, 1026


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode #10-24 /1697th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 6/14/2010 through Sunday 6/20/2010

"Join Us In Our Annual Day Star Day Celebration
On This Summer Solstice Weekend 2010!"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Every year on the summer solstice we ask you to experience a great star rise over our Earth's horizon. A star so huge we could fit over one and a quarter million Earths inside it. It sounds simple enough but few people ever pay close enough attention to ever really experience the rising of the only star we can see in the day time, the star we call our Sun, a star I like to call our Day Star.

Now since the summer solstice officially occurs at 7:28 a.m. Eastern time Monday the 21st which is a work day, we are suggesting you celebrate Day Star Day on Saturday or Sunday, the 19th and 20th. Now I know some of you are thinking that I'm talking about a sunrise and that you've seen thousands of them. But believe it or not although you may have see thousands of sunrises very few people have ever taken the time to completely experience what's happening all around them as the Sun rises because sunrise involves a complex series of steps as night slowly turns into dawn and finally into day.

And believe me if you follow our simple instructions you will be amazed at what you've missed because you will experience one of the grandest events in nature which most people ignore. To participate here is all you have to do. Simply get up fifteen minutes before twilight begins while it is still dark out on the day you've chosen and whether you live in the heart of a city or out in the country makes no difference because it's not the Sun itself you're going to observe but the effects of sunrise on everything around you as your part of the world slowly turns from night into day. It is better to be outside but if not just sit by an open window.

Now for the rules which are absolutely essential: no radio, no television, no doing your normal wake up routine. All distractions must be eliminated. Simply sit quietly inside or outside and when you see the sky slowly start to brighten look, listen and feel what happens all around you because a sunrise is more than visual. Watch the delicate interplay of light, color and shadow, but also listen and you will hear the sounds of our world and its creatures waking up. You'll feel the wind change, the temperature change and much, much more. Keep track of all the subtle changes you notice and record your observations on paper or into a voice recorder. Then read or listen to your observations a few days later. Believe me if you've never done this before you'll be absolutely amazed at what a star rise over a small planet can do for you.

Of course remember to never look directly at the Sun at any time, as you can do permanent eye damage before you feel any real pain. Only observe the effects of the Sun on the world around you. I truly think that many of you will gain a whole different perspective of your place on this planet and our planet's place in the universe, a perspective that you may find life altering. Happy "Day Star Day", my friends, and keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#10-24 M

6/14/2010 thru 6/20/2010

"Join Us In Our Annual Day Star Day Celebration
On This Summer Solstice Weekend 2010!"

Horkheimer: On this year's summer solstice Monday June 21st we invite you to celebrate the rising of our local star the Sun because most people have never really experienced a sunrise. Get up before twilight begins to observe not the Sun itself but the incredible effects of a sunrise on everything all around you. Sit quietly and tune in with all your senses. Listen to the different sounds of nature as our earth wakes up. Feel the wind and temperature change and watch the delicate interplay of light, color and shadow. We call our Sun our Day Star because it is the only star we can see in the daytime and if you've never really paid close attention to a sunrise you will be amazed at what you've missed. So celebrate day star day with us Monday the 21st or if you prefer the weekend, the 19th or 20th. Keep looking up!


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half Hour Feed STAH 912
Thursday May 20, 2010, 1130-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 1023, 1024, 1025, 1026


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode # 10-25 / 1698th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 5/17/2010 through Sunday 5/23/2010

"The Stars Of Early Summer Nights Welcome In
The New Season And Say Farewell To The Old"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Even though this week is the first week of summer for the northern hemisphere we can still see many of the bright stars of late spring. However they won't be around long because the brightest stars of summer are rising and announcing they will soon take over the heavens. Let me show you.

O.K. We've got our skies set up for this week and next just after dark which will be between ten and eleven p.m. for many of you, facing north where you'll see the Little Dipper at its very highest above the north star. In fact, the North Star is the star at the end of the handle of the Little Dipper. Now the Little Dipper is not nearly as large or bright as the Big Dipper which is directly to its left in the northwest. Four stars mark its cup and three stars mark its handle. And once you've found it you can shoot an arrow through its handle to find the 3rd brightest star in the sky, Arcturus which is the major star of Bootes the Herdsman although the entire constellation looks something like a kite. You can extend that arrow from Arcturus over to the brightest star of Virgo, Spica. Remember? Arc to Arcturus, speed on to Spica!

Now, we can tell from the stars alone that spring is almost over because spring's most famous constellation is just above the western horizon. A sickle shaped pattern or backward question mark of stars marks the front part of Leo the Lion and a triangle of stars marks his rear. And he looks like he's getting ready to lunge below the horizon before summer kicks him out of evening skies. Next if you turn 180 degrees around and face east you will see the three incredibly bright stars which mark the points of a very large triangle, the brightest of which is Vega, the second brightest Altair and the third Deneb, the three stars which mark the points of the great Summer Triangle. And every summer in mid June just after it gets good and dark out we always see this triangle of three celestial dazzlers rising over the eastern horizon.

Of course, my personal favorite stars of summer are always somewhere in the south, southeast or southwest. So just look south and there you'll see a giant fish hook shaped pattern of stars which is none other than summer's infamous Scorpius the Scorpion, which is trailed by the teapot shaped portion of stars which make up part of the constellation Sagittarius the Centaur. So there you have it bright summer stars announcing their arrival and the stars of spring bidding us farewell. Keep looking up.


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#10-25 M

6/21/2010 thru 6/27/2010

"The Stars Of Early Summer Nights Welcome In
The New Season And Say Farewell To The Old"

Horkheimer: Summer officially began last Monday. And if you wait until it gets good and dark out you'll see wonderful stars in every direction. Face north and the Big Dipper's handle points to the brightest star of summer Arcturus while in the west spring's Leo the Lion is getting ready to plunge below the horizon. In the east you'll see Vega, Deneb and Altair, the three very bright stars which make up the Summer Triangle and announce the beginning of summer. Finally look south for summer's two horizon hugging constellations, the fish hook shaped Scorpius the Scorpion followed by the teapot portion of Sagittarius. So get thee out and see the stars of summer now as they make their entrance on the cosmic stage. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half Hour Feed STAH 912
Thursday May 20, 2010, 1130-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 1023, 1024, 1025, 1026


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode # 10-26 / 1699th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 6/28/2010 through Sunday 7/4/2010

"Earth At Aphelion And Start Your
Three Planet And A Great Star Watch
On The 4th Of July"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Believe it or not on Tuesday July 6th the Earth will be at its farthest point from the Sun for the entire year, only 94.5 million miles away which is 3 million miles farther than it was when it was at its closest on January 2nd. So why is it hotter right now if the Sun is farther away in July than it is in January? It all has to do with the Earth's tilt. In July our Earth is tilted so that the Sun's rays are aimed more directly at the northern hemisphere than they were in January. Just the opposite is true for the southern hemisphere. Think about it. But now I'd like to show you three planets and one great star which you can see just after it gets dark out on the 4th of July and which you can watch move toward each other all month long resulting in a spectacular meeting on July 30th. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Sunday night the 4th of July just after dark facing west where the brightest thing you will see will be planet #2, the brightest planet of them all and same size as our planet Earth, 8,000 mile wide Venus. And just up to its left you'll see a much less bright object which is Regulus the star which marks the heart of Leo the Lion. And up to its left a steadily glowing rouge gold light, planet #4 and half the size of planet Earth and Venus, 4,000 mile wide Mars. And up to its left planet #6, the lord of the rings, 75,000 mile wide Saturn.

They will look as if they are lined up in a row and indeed they are because all the planets travel on a narrow pathway around the sky called the ecliptic, so named because it is also the pathway along which eclipses always occur. And now here's the fun part.

Make a mental note of where Venus is in relation to Regulus and then watch every single night because Venus and Regulus will move toward each other at the rate of one degree each night, which is the equivalent of two full Moon widths and which is really dramatic. You'll get your reward Friday night when Venus and Regulus will be at their closest only one degree apart, which means only two full Moons could fit between them. Then if you continue to watch every night you will notice that each night Venus moves a little closer to Mars and Mars moves a little closer to Saturn. On Friday the 16th Venus and Mars will be 15 degrees apart while Mars and Saturn will be only 7 1/2 degrees apart. But continue watching and a week later on Friday the 23rd Venus and Mars will be only 11 1/2 degrees apart and Mars and Saturn only 4 degrees apart.

And ta da! It gets even better because during the last week of July they'll continue moving closer to each other and have an exquisite meeting on Friday July 30th when just after Sunset Venus and Mars will be less than 8 degrees apart and Mars and Saturn less than 2. And all three will form an isosceles triangle. Wow! Once again this Sunday July 4th, Friday July 9th, Friday July 16th, Friday July 23rd and ta da! Friday July 30th! Start your planet watch on the 4th of July and keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#10-26 M

6/28/2010 thru 7/4/2010

"Earth At Aphelion And Start Your
Three Planet And A Great Star Watch
On The 4th Of July"

Horkheimer: On the 4th of July you can begin watching a wonderful race of the planets. Just after dark face west and you'll see brilliant Venus, Regulus the heart star of Leo, rouge gold Mars and the ringed planet Saturn all lined up in a row. Watch them change their positions each night. On Friday the 9th Venus and Regulus will be only one degree apart, by Friday the 16th Venus and Mars 15 degrees apart and Mars and Saturn 7 _ degrees apart, on the 23rd Venus and Mars only 11 _ degrees apart and Mars and Saturn only 4 degrees. The best however happens on Friday July 30th when they'll have an exquisite triangular meeting and Venus and Mars will be less than 8 degrees apart and Mars and Saturn less than 2. Wow! Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer

 


[SmilinJack]Return to the [STAR GAZER Main Page]