STAR HUSTLER

THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR HUSTLER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. If it is not currently on you PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take a months worth of STAR HUSTLER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc.

Satellite feed for June 1996 is as follows: The feed will be June 24 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.

Satellite feed for July 1996 is as follows: The feed will be July 29 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.

Satellite feed for August 1996 is as follows: The feed will be August 26 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.


Notice : These are rough drafts of the scripts for STAR HUSTLER. Changes may well be made as production requires.

STAR HUSTLER EPISODE #358-I

965th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 6/3/96 through Sunday 6/9/96

"Mars and Mercury Mornings and The Search For the Morning Star"

Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and you know, we usually talk about what you can find in early evening skies on STAR HUSTLER because most people are not up in early morning, which is really not fair to all of you who get up either with or before the chickens. So in this episode we're going to talk about two wonderful planets you can see in early morning skies just before sunrise this month and we'll also show you how to begin your personal search for the morning star. O.K., we've got our skies set up for Monday morning, June 10th at dawn and if you look east/northeast and have an extremely clear, flat horizon you'll be able to see our old friends, the Seven Sisters, The Pleiades, very faintly in brightening skies. But down to their right you'll see a much brighter object, a reddish light which is the 4 thousand mile wide planet Mars, and down to its right, really snuggling the horizon, the very elusive 3 thousand mile wide closest to the sun planet Mercury. Now although Mars and Mercury will be a real challenge to spot on June 10th, the reason I've chosen June 10th is because another planet which was the most brilliant planet of the first half of the year, Venus, is at what we call inferior conjunction that day, which simply means it is between us and the sun and thus cannot be seen, even though last week it could be seen shortly after sunset snuggling the northwest horizon. You see, Venus is getting ready to change from a brilliant evening star to an exquisite morning star, which will become quite obvious in July. However, if you are an early morning riser and enjoy catching planets just as they make their first appearances, then now is the time to prepare to find Venus as it first becomes visible as the morning star. Now it should appear some time this week to observers with good eyesight and a very flat horizon. So go outside every morning about half an hour before dawn, look east/northeast, find Mars and Mercury and begin your search for the morning star. On Wednesday, June 12th the Pleiades, Mars and Mercury will be joined by an exquisite old crescent moon, and the next day, Thursday the 13th, an even slimmer moon will be snuggling up next to them. Now what date you'll spot Venus popping up over the horizon depends on your location, your horizon and the clarity of your skies. On the first day of summer, the Summer Solstice, Thursday June 20th almost everyone will see it, and ten days later on Sunday morning, June 30th it will be well up past Mercury, nestled next to Mars. So begin your search now! And oh, by the way, Sunday morning, June 23rd at dawn if you have a pair of binoculars you'll see Mercury and Venus snuggled up only one and a half degrees away from each other. Wow! What a lovely month for early risers to Keep Looking Up!

* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


STAR HUSTLER

THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR HUSTLER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. If it is not currently on you PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take a months worth of STAR HUSTLER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc.

Satellite feed for June 1996 is as follows: The feed will be June 24 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.

Satellite feed for July 1996 is as follows: The feed will be July 29 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.

Satellite feed for August 1996 is as follows: The feed will be August 26 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.


Notice : These are rough drafts of the scripts for STAR HUSTLER. Changes may well be made as production requires.

STAR HUSTLER EPISODE #359-I

966th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 6/10/96 through Sunday 6/16/96

"Day Star Star-Rise Day and How To Win A Pair Of Night Sky Binoculars"

Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and once again we're going to ask you to participate in something which the majority of people on this planet have never really experienced. Indeed, we are going to prepare you for the dramatic rising of a great star over our Earth's horizon... a star so huge that we could fit one million three hundred thousand earths inside it... a star whose surface temperature is over 10 thousand degrees Fahrenheit. Yes, we are asking you to observe the rising of the closest star to our earth, the only star we can see in the daytime, the star we call our Sun. A star which would be better named our day star. And once again we have chosen the first day of summer, the Summer Solstice, Thursday, June 20th as day star star- rise day. But, many of you are undoubtedly thinking, "You're talking about a sunrise, and I've seen thousands of sunrises in my life." And yes, I am talking about a sunrise but believe it or not, the majority of the people on this planet have never truly experienced a sunrise, especially in our hi-tech society. Oh yes, there are millions of you out there who get up at the crack of dawn to get ready for a day's work, farmers starting their chores, commuters catching their trains or jamming the expressways as the Sun slowly creeps over the horizon, but that is not experiencing a sunrise because to most people sunrise is a peripheral event and not the center of attention. So that's why we have set aside this day so you can experience one of the grandest events in nature...an experience which may change the way you view the world forever. To participate here's what you do: mark Thursday, June 20th as the day when you'll get up 15 minutes before twilight begins, while it's still dark. And whether you live in the heart of a city or out in the country makes no difference because it's not the sun itself that you are going to observe when it rises. No, you're going to observe the effects of the sunrise on everything all around you as night slowly turns into day. It's best if you can be outside, but if not just sit by a window. Now for the rules which are absolutely essential: no radio, television, no doing your normal wake up routine, all distractions must be eliminated. Simply sit quietly and when you see the sky slowly start to brighten, look and listen and feel what happens all around you, for a sunrise is not just visual. Indeed, you will hear the sounds of the world waking up. You'll feel the wind change, the temperature change and much much more as night slowly slips into day. Keep track of all the subtle changes you notice and record all your observations and when you're finished send your observations to "STAR HUSTLER, DAY STAR DAY, P.O. BOX 2, MIAMI, FLORIDA, 33261". A panel of judges will select five of the most outstanding reports and those five will each receive a pair of beautiful night sky binoculars. Now if you've never done this before you're in for a big surprise, because experiencing a sunrise using all your senses is one of the most wonderful experiences this planet has to offer, and one more good reason to Keep Looking Up!

*This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


STAR HUSTLER

THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR HUSTLER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. If it is not currently on you PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take a months worth of STAR HUSTLER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc.

Satellite feed for June 1996 is as follows: The feed will be June 24 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.

Satellite feed for July 1996 is as follows: The feed will be July 29 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.

Satellite feed for August 1996 is as follows: The feed will be August 26 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.


Notice : These are rough drafts of the scripts for STAR HUSTLER. Changes may well be made as production requires.

STAR HUSTLER EPISODE #360-I

967th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 6/17/96 through Sunday 6/23/96

"Earth at Aphelion and A Jovian 4th of July"

Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and this year we have 2 cosmic events the first week of July. Indeed, at 2 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, July 5th our planet Earth will be at aphelion, 'ap' meaning away from and 'helion' meaning Sun, which translated means that at that moment our Earth will be at its very farthest away from the Sun for the entire year. How far? Well, on January 4th, when our Earth was at perihelion, 'peri' meaning close and 'helion' meaning Sun, that is nearest to the Sun, it was 91 million miles away. But by this week, July 5th, it will have moved 3 million miles farther away and will be 94 million miles distant. And if you're asking, then why isn't it colder now if we're farther away? I suggest you run immediately to your nearest encyclopedia. I'll give you a clue however: it has to do with tilt, the Earth's tilt that is. And now, something very special that you can see all night the 4th of July from the time the sun sets until it rises the next morning. Let me show you: OK, we've got our skies set up for sunset the 4th of July, and if you look over toward the southeast you'll notice that my favorite, and almost everyone's favorite, 2 star patterns of summer are just above the horizon. Scorpius the scorpion, looking like a capital letter "J", and the portion of Sagittarius that looks very much like a teapot. If we draw lines between these 2 stars for the bottom of the teapot, between these stars for the spout, these stars for the lid, and these for the teapot's handle. But this year the teapot has an extra added attraction just behind its handle. An object many times brighter than any of the stars in either the teapot or the scorpion. It is the largest planet of them all, our good old friend, Jupiter by Jove. And July 4th this year is Jupiter's biggest night because on this night Jupiter will be at opposition which means that this July 4th Jupiter will be at its closest and brightest for the entire year and will be seen in the sky all night long; rising in the southeast as the Sun sets in the Northwest and traveling slowly across the sky all night long until at dawn it sets in the southwest as the Sun rises in the northeast. You see, whenever a planet is at opposition it simply means, astronomically speaking, that it is opposite the Sun in the sky as seen from our planet Earth, thus whenever the Sun is not in the sky, Jupiter will be, which means that it will be with us all night long, July 4th. And if you'd like an easy way to find Jupiter before the 4th of July, simply go outside Monday night, July 1st and look for the full moon, and smack dab right beside it you will find Jupiter and you will be able to watch it and the Moon ride across the sky together almost all night long. So this Independence Day remember that although we are as far from the Sun as we can get, Jupiter will be as good as it can get. A cosmic extra to add to this year's fireworks if you remember to Keep Looking Up!

*This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


STAR HUSTLER

THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR HUSTLER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. If it is not currently on you PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take a months worth of STAR HUSTLER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc.

Satellite feed for June 1996 is as follows: The feed will be June 24 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.

Satellite feed for July 1996 is as follows: The feed will be July 29 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.

Satellite feed for August 1996 is as follows: The feed will be August 26 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.


Notice : These are rough drafts of the scripts for STAR HUSTLER. Changes may well be made as production requires.

STAR HUSTLER EPISODE #361-I

968th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 6/24/96 through Sunday 6/30/96

"The Blue Moons of June and July, 1996: A Modern Mystery; and How To Win A Telescope!"

Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and although all of you out there have undoubtedly heard the phrase "Once in a blue moon", have you ever really seen one? Well ,not likely even though this month and next month, June and July of '96 will each experience a blue moon, depending on where you are. You see, in this century the term "Blue Moon" has somehow or other come to be associated not with the moon's color, but with the moon's phase. And nowadays whenever there are 2 full moons in one month, the second full moon is called a Blue Moon. No one knows where this custom, modern or otherwise, got started. Indeed, it's been a subject of no small controversy among astronomy writers and has sometimes amounted to a small blue tempest in a teapot, so much so that back in 1993 we held a "What's a Blue Moon anyway?" nationwide contest. And although we received hundreds of good answers as to what causes a moon to actually change blue, and the historical and folklore origins of the term blue moon, we received very few really good answers as to why the second full moon of the month is called a Blue Moon. So once again, if you know why the second full moon of any month is called the Blue Moon and can substantiate your claim please write us. We'd love to hear from you. At any rate, astronomically speaking we experience 2 full moons in one month every two and three quarter years. So how can this June and July both have a full moon? Well, it all depends upon where you live. You see a full moon, astronomically speaking, is actually a precise moment in time. Now for people on the North American continent the 2nd full moon of June occurs 2 minutes before midnight, Eastern Daylight Time, the last day of June, June 30th. If it occurred 2 minutes and 1 second later, this would not be the second full moon of June, but would rather be the first full moon of July, thus giving July 2 full moons with its second full moon being the blue moon. In fact, for people east of the Eastern time zone, all throughout the Atlantic and Europe, July will have 2 full moons instead of June. So, Happy June Blue Moon to all of you on the North American continent, and a similar salutation in July for all of you in Europe; all of which would could lead us to the question; if Blue Moons don't actually look blue, is it possible to ever really see a real blue colored moon? The answer is, yes. Any forest fire fighter will tell you moons frequently look blue as viewed through smoky skies. And sometimes, after great volcanic eruptions the moon has also turned blue. So if you live near a volcano and happen to see a blue-colored moon I would suggest making a very quick move. At any rate, if you think you know where the term "Blue Moon", for the second full moon of the month originated, write us at STAR HUSTLER/ Blue Moon, P.O. Box 2 Miami Fl 33261. The best 3 answers, as determined by a panel of judges, will each receive a nifty 60 millimeter telescope which should give you reason to go to the library to look it up, as you remember to Keep Looking Up!

* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.



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