STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

2/20/2001 9:30 - 10:00 am Eastern time (4 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


STAR GAZER

Episode # 01-10 / 1213th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 3/5/2001 through Sunday 3/11/2001

"Venus Makes A Spectacular Exit and Entrance!"

 

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers and if you're one of those who gets up with the chickens then you've undoubtedly noticed two red lights in the southern sky, one of which is the planet Mars and the other, its red rival and anti-namesake. Let me show you;

O.K., We've got our skies set up for this Thursday morning, the 15th, just before sunrise facing due south where you'll see a slightly waning gibbous moon and to its left a red planet named for the bloody Roman god of War, a planet exactly half the size of our 8 thousand mile wide earth, 4 thousand mile wide Mars. And from the beginning of this month 'til the end of this month it will actually double in brightness because it's racing toward our earth. In fact on March 1st it was 112 million miles away but on March 31st it will be 27 million miles closer, only 85 million miles away. And it will reach its closest point on the first night of summer, June 21st when it will be only 42 million miles away which is the closest it's been since 1988, and you can watch it brighten night after night, week after week.

Now just below the moon on the 15th and down and to the right of Mars, you'll see another red object which looks very much like Mars both in color and brightness. In fact, whenever Mars came close to this red object our ancestors always remarked how similar they looked...So much so that they named it Antares which means the Rival of Mars.

You see, in ancient Greek Mars was called Ares and Ant-Ares means the Rival of Ares, thus the Rival of Mars. And I have to tell you that I personally just love it whenever Mars moves into the same part of the sky as Antares because I can then look up and understand how our ancient ancestors marveled at these two objects looking so much alike. They associated both of these objects with blood and war. In fact, Antares marks the bloody red heart of Scorpius the Scorpion.

Now although our ancestors thought of Mars as a much more important object than Antares because Mars frequently gets much brighter than Antares, we know that in reality such is not the case. Indeed, Mars is a relatively close, tiny planet and its constantly changing distance from us is what makes it alternately dim and brighten, regular as clock work every 2 years.

But Antares, the Rival of Mars really out-rivals Mars beyond the wildest imagination of our ancestors. In fact, 500 million mile wide Antares is so huge we could fit 2 billion million Mars inside it. Wow! So get thee outside to watch the moon to the right of Mars and above Antares on Thursday the 15th and then watch it move to their left on Friday the 16th. Start your Mars watch now and compare the two rivals for yourself. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#01-10 M

3/05/2001 thru 3/11/2001

"Venus As The Evening and Morning Star"

Horkheimer: Over 2,000 years ago the red planet Mars was called Ares and some ancient astronomers noticed that one star in the heavens, which Mars sometimes visited, looked incredibly like it, so they named it Antares which means 'The Rival of Mars'. And right now Mars is once again paying it a visit and you can see for yourself how much they look alike. At dawn on the 15th a gibbous moon will be to the right of Mars and above Antares, and on the 16th to their left. But although they rival each other in color and brightness, it ends there. Indeed while Mars is a 4 thousand mile wide planet, Antares is a 500 million mile wide star, so huge we could fit 2 billion million Mars inside it. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer







STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

2/20/2001 9:30 - 10:00 am Eastern time (4 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov




Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #01-11 /1214th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 3/12/2001 through Sunday 3/18/2001

"The Red Planet Meets Its Red Rival!"

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers and if you're one of those who gets up with the chickens then you've undoubtedly noticed two red lights in the southern sky, one of which is the planet Mars and the other, its red rival and anti-namesake. Let me show you;

O.K., We've got our skies set up for this Thursday morning, the 15th, just before sunrise facing due south where you'll see a slightly waning gibbous moon and to its left a red planet named for the bloody Roman god of War, a planet exactly half the size of our 8 thousand mile wide earth, 4 thousand mile wide Mars. And from the beginning of this month 'til the end of this month it will actually double in brightness because it's racing toward our earth. In fact on March 1st it was 112 million miles away but on March 31st it will be 27 million miles closer, only 85 million miles away. And it will reach its closest point on the first night of summer, June 21st when it will be only 42 million miles away which is the closest it's been since 1988, and you can watch it brighten night after night, week after week.

Now just below the moon on the 15th and down and to the right of Mars, you'll see another red object which looks very much like Mars both in color and brightness. In fact, whenever Mars came close to this red object our ancestors always remarked how similar they looked...So much so that they named it Antares which means the Rival of Mars.

You see, in ancient Greek Mars was called Ares and Ant-Ares means the Rival of Ares, thus the Rival of Mars. And I have to tell you that I personally just love it whenever Mars moves into the same part of the sky as Antares because I can then look up and understand how our ancient ancestors marveled at these two objects looking so much alike. They associated both of these objects with blood and war. In fact, Antares marks the bloody red heart of Scorpius the Scorpion.

Now although our ancestors thought of Mars as a much more important object than Antares because Mars frequently gets much brighter than Antares, we know that in reality such is not the case. Indeed, Mars is a relatively close, tiny planet and its constantly changing distance from us is what makes it alternately dim and brighten, regular as clock work every 2 years.

But Antares, the Rival of Mars really out-rivals Mars beyond the wildest imagination of our ancestors. In fact, 500 million mile wide Antares is so huge we could fit 2 billion million Mars inside it. So get thee outside to watch the moon to the right of Mars and Antares on Thursday the 15th and then watch it move to their left on Friday the 16th. Start your Mars watch now and compare the two rivals yourself. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.



Star Gazer Minute

#01-11 M

3/12/2001 thru 3/18/2001

"The Red Planet Meets Its Red Rival"

Horkheimer: Over 2,000 years ago the red planet Mars was called Ares and some ancient astronomers noticed that one star in the heavens, which Mars sometimes visited, looked incredibly like it, so they named it Antares which means 'The Rival of Mars'. And right now Mars is once again paying it a visit and you can see for yourself how much they look alike. At dawn on the 15th a gibbous moon will be to the right of Mars and above Antares, and on the 16th to their left. Although they rival each other in color and brightness, it ends there. Indeed while Mars is a 4 thousand mile wide planet, Antares is a 500 million mile wide star, so huge we could fit 2 billion million Mars inside it. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

2/20/2001 9:30 - 10:00 am Eastern time (4 shows)

Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 01-12 / 1215th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 3/19/2001 through Sunday 3/25/2001

"Spring Right In Your Face!
And The Last Good
Moon/Jupiter/Saturn Get-Together"
 

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers and this week spring officially arrived in the northern hemisphere on Tuesday the 20th at 8:31 A.M. Eastern Standard Time because at that precise moment our sun was smack dab on the celestial equator, the effect of which you can see for yourself if you drive to and from work on a due east/west running highway because during the first week of spring the sun will rise due east and set due west.

So if you're driving to work this week on a due east highway at sunrise put those sun visors down because the sun will rise directly over the yellow line in the middle of the road, and vice versa if you're driving home from work on a due west highway at sunset, the sun will set over the yellow line in the middle of the road. So, if the weather outside doesn't feel like spring at least you can prove it's here astronomically by observing due east sunrises and due west sunsets all week long.

But now if you want to see something really beautiful after the sun has set might I suggest you go outside at sunset next Monday, March 26th and face due west because if you have a clear, flat horizon you'll see an exquisite crescent moon gleaming low in the twilight. On the next night, Tuesday the 27th an even nicer crescent moon, complete with earth shine which looks like a dark full moon nestled inside the crescent will be half way up from the horizon to 2 bright lights, the first of which is the 75 thousand mile wide ringed planet Saturn, and the second of which is 88 thousand mile wide Jupiter. And if you're a regular star gazer viewer you're probably already guessing that the next 2 nights will be even better.

Indeed, on Wednesday the 28th an even more exquisite crescent moon with earth shine, or what some call "the old moon in the new moon's arms" will be huddled just underneath Saturn in the last really good moon/Saturn pairing in evening skies of the entire year. Don't miss this please. And if you have a small telescope please, please look at Saturn during the next few weeks because it's moving farther and farther away from us every night and will soon disappear from evening skies.

Now if you go out Thursday night the 29th an even fatter crescent moon will provide an absolutely spectacular sight as it pairs up alongside good old Jupiter, the king of the planets. In fact this will be the last close pairing of a crescent moon and Jupiter in evening skies for the entire year. And take a look at Jupiter through a telescope now because it too is moving farther away from us.

So there you have it. The sun in your face driving east and west proving that spring is really here, and an exquisite pairing of the moon and Saturn on the 28th, and the moon and Jupiter on the 29th. Wow! What a wonderful way to welcome spring. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#01-12 M

3/19/2001 thru 3/25/2001

"Spring Right In Your Face!
And The Last Good
Moon/Jupiter/Saturn Get-Together"

Horkheimer: Spring is officially here this week which means that for a few days the sun will rise and set exactly due east and due west. Which means that if you drive to work at sunrise on a due east highway the sun will rise right over the yellow line in the middle of the road and if you drive home due west at sunset the sun will set directly over the yellow line in the middle of the road. So put those sun visors down. And to see the last close pairing of the moon and the 2 largest planets, on the 28th an exquisite crescent moon will be huddled just underneath Saturn and on the 29th it will be right alongside the king of the planets Jupiter. Two perfect nights to get out your telescope. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer





STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

2/20/2001 9:30 - 10:00 am Eastern time (4 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #01-13 /1216th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 3/26/2001 through Sunday 4/1/2001

"How To Use the Moon and Your Fingers
To Measure Distances In The Night Sky"

 

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers and if you're a regular "Star Gazer" viewer you've often heard me use the word 'degree' when I talk about how far away one celestial object is from another visually, but if you have a hard time visualizing just how big one degree or several degrees is in the night sky you can always use the moon or your fingers and your fist. Let me show you:

Now the system for measuring sky distances using degrees is based on the circle, and as we remember from elementary school, we always divide circles up into 360 sections called degrees. And if we think of the sky as completely circling our earth, then we see only half the sky or half a circle at a time, and half a circle is 180 degrees which is the distance from one horizon to directly over head and back down to the opposite horizon. So the distance from any point on the horizon to directly overhead is half of 180 degrees, or 90 degrees. So if I tell you a planet or a star is half way up the sky from the horizon to overhead, it will be half of 90 degrees or 45 degrees high and so on. Quite simple.

But the really tough part for most people is measuring small numbers of degrees such as 1 degree, 10 degrees, and so on, and that's where we can use the moon and your fingers as measuring sticks. Now if you can remember that a full moon is exactly 1/2 a degree wide you'll never have a problem measuring distances as long as the moon is out. Simply remember that 2 full moons side by side equals 1 degree. And if you hold your hand out in front of you at arm's length, just coincidentally your pinky finger would cover those 2 full moons. So your pinky finger, at arm's length, also measures one degree.

But what if you want to measure larger distances, like 10 degrees for instance? Well, 10 degrees would be 20 full moons lined up side by side. But that's kind of hard to visualize, so simply hold your hand out in front of you at arm's length and your fist against the night sky will measure 10 degrees. What could be simpler? One full moon is 1/2 a degree, 2 full moons is one degree, as is your pinky finger. And your fist is 10 degrees. And if you want to measure large distances, like 20 degrees, put one of your fists on top of the other at arm's length and voila! there's 20 degrees measured in the sky.

And now I'd like to let you in on a little secret. Most people think the full moon is much larger than it actually is. Remember it's only 1/2 a degree wide. So, if you ask somebody how many full moon's it would take, lined up end to end, to reach from the horizon to overhead, most people would guess 40 to 50. But in reality since it's 90 degrees from the horizon to directly overhead, we could line up 180 full moons end to end from the horizon to overhead.

So because Jupiter and Saturn are 10 degrees away from each other this week we could say that the distance between them is 1 fist or 10 pinky fingers wide, or that we could line up 20 full moons side by side between them. It's really easy and fun to measure your way around the night sky. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.


Star Gazer Minute

#01-13M

3/26/2001 thru 4/1/2001

"How to Use The Moon And Your Fingers
To Measure Distances In The Night Sky"

 

Horkheimer: Astronomers measure distances between celestial objects in degrees. But do you know how big 1 degree really is? Well, the full moon is 1/2 a degree wide so 1 degree is 2 full moons wide but what do you do when the moon's not out? Simple! Use your hand outstretched at arm's length and your pinky finger will measure 1 degree against the sky and your fist will measure 10 degrees. So because Jupiter and Saturn are 10 degrees away from each other this week we could say that the distance between them is 1 fist or 10 pinky fingers wide, or that we could line up 20 full moons side by side between them. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from Meade Instruments, the world's largest manufacturer of telescopes for amateur astronomers. Meade telescopes automatically locate 1000's of celestial wonders at the push of a button. It's astronomy made simple.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only
Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer

 



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