STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Wednesday 2/20/08 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0809, 0810, 0811, 0812, 0813


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

"Star Gazer" is available for downloading
with Quicktime as well as RealPlayer streaming video.

 Click Here

 Click Here

 Click Here

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 08-09 / 1578th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 3/03/2008 through
Sunday 3/09/2008

"The Two Stars Above And The Two Stars Below
The Fabled Belt Stars Of Orion"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Everyone loves winter's brilliant constellation Orion the Hunter because his three belt stars are the only three stars equally spaced in a row we can see with the naked eye. But the two bright stars above the belt and the two bright stars below the belt are also quite wonderful.

O.K. We've got our skies set up for just after it gets dark out facing southwest. To find Orion simply look for the three bright evenly spaced stars in a row, which mark his belt. The two above of course are his shoulder stars and the two below mark his knees. Now although the night sky doesn't look very three dimensional, in reality all the stars are different distances away from our Earth and each other. And one way to measure these distances is with the speed of light. Light travels 186,000 miles a second. So when we look at the star closest to Earth, which is our Sun, since it is 93 million miles away we see the light that left it 8 and 1/3 minutes ago. So we say that our Sun is 8 1/3 light minutes away. All the other stars however are so far away it takes years for their light to reach us.

For instance of Orion's four bright stars his shoulder star Bellatrix is the closest, 240 light years away which means we see the light that left it 240 years ago. Betelgeuse the next closest is over twice as far away, 520 light years. Which means we see the light that left it 520 years ago. But Orion's two knee stars are even farther away. Rigel is 800 light years and Saiph 820, which means that the light we see now, left them 300 years before Columbus' voyage to America. Wow! To remember the distances closest to farthest, just remember right shoulder, left shoulder, right knee, left knee. What's equally impressive is that stars come in all different sizes. And the easiest way to illustrate this is to compare them to our almost million mile wide Sun, which is considered a rather small star. Orion's shoulder star Bellatrix is 6 times as wide as our Sun which really sounds impressive until you look at the knee star Saiph which is 38 times as wide as our sun.

And it gets even better. The other knee star Rigel is 50 times as wide as our sSun. But you ain't seen nothin' yet, because Betelgeuse, the red shoulder star, is a what we call a variable star and changes its size regularly. Contracted to its smallest size it is 500 times as wide as our sSun and when it is expanded to its largest, 900 times as wide. Wow again! And an easy way to remember the order of size of these stars is right shoulder to left knee to right knee to left shoulder. So get thee out and try to imagine the sizes and distances of each of these four stars. And believe me after a while you'll almost see them in your mind in three dimensions. Keep looking up!

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


"Star Gazer" is available for downloading
with Quicktime as well as RealPlayer streaming video.

Check Out WPBT's Version

 Click Here

 Click Here

 Click Here

 Click Here

Star Gazer Minute

#08-09 M

3/03/2008 thru 3/09/2008

"The Two Stars Above And The Two Stars Below
The Fabled Belt Stars Of Orion"

Horkheimer: Would you like to see the stars in 3-d? Just after dark face southwest, find Orion's belt stars, shoulder stars and knee stars. Now although Orion doesn't look three dimensional, in reality these stars are different distances away from us. From closest to farthest the shoulder star Bellatrix is 240 light years away, which means we see the light that left it 240 years ago. Betelgeuse is over twice as far, 520 light years. But Orion's knee stars are even farther. Rigel is 800 light years and Saiph 820, which means the light we see from them now left them 300 years before Columbus' voyage to America. Wow! Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Wednesday 2/20/08 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0809, 0810, 0811, 0812, 0813


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.




"Star Gazer" is available for downloading
with Quicktime as well as RealPlayer streaming video.

 Click Here

 Click Here

 Click Here

STAR GAZER

Episode #08-10 /1579th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 3/10/2008 through Sunday 3/16/2008

"The Gibbous Moon Meets The Heart Of Leo
And The Lord Of The Rings And
Mars Is Super High At Sunset"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. If you go out any night this week and next just after sunset you'll still be able to see Mars extremely high above the horizon even though it is rapidly racing away from Earth. But better yet, next Tuesday night March 18th, an exquisite gibbous Moon will be lined up with Regulus the heart star of Leo the Lion and Saturn the planet lord of the rings, after which it will grow into a full Moon. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for any night this week and next just after sunset facing south where extremely high above the horizon you'll see an orangeish gold light which is the planet which was brighter than any star Christmas Eve because it was only 55 million miles away but which is now much, much dimmer because it is now twice as far away, over 107 million miles! So catch it now and go to our website to see some fantastic pictures by Mars photographer, Dr. Donald Parker of Coral Gables, Florida.

And now for those of you who like a little help finding celestial objects you'll be able to use an exquisite Moon on Tuesday night the 18th to find a fabulous star and an equally fabulous planet. Just after sunset face east and you'll see an exquisite gibbous Moon only four days away from becoming full. Now the word gibbous has its origins in the word 'humped' and indeed gibbous Moons always look like a quarter Moon with a hump on it. You see as the first quarter Moon waxes that is grows larger and larger we say that that growing-bigger-each-night- Moon - until-full Moon is a waxing gibbous Moon. So once you've found the gibbous Moon look just down to its left and you'll see the bluish white star Regulus which is the brightest star in Leo the Lion which marks his heart. And if you draw a line from the gibbous Moon through Regulus it will pass straight through an even brighter light, planet number seven, ringed Saturn.

Once again, find the gibbous Moon, then draw a straight line down to its left and that line will pass right through Regulus and then Saturn. Now on the following night Wednesday the 19th, the Moon will still be gibbous but slightly larger and the next night Thursday the 20th, the first day of spring, larger still and almost full. But it won't be officially full until Friday the 21st. And this full Moon has several wonderful names among which are and the Paschal Moon, the Sap Moon, the Crow Moon, and yecch, the Worm Moon! So there you have it, a gibbous Moon lines up with Regulus and Saturn on the 18th, grows bigger on the 19th, is even bigger on the 20th, the first day of spring, and ta da, on the 21st is full. Plus our old friend Mars is almost overhead at sunset. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


"Star Gazer" is available for downloading
with Quicktime as well as RealPlayer streaming video.

Check Out WPBT's Version

 Click Here

 Click Here

 Click Here

 Click Here

Star Gazer Minute

#08-10 M

3/10/2008 thru 3/16/2008

"The Gibbous Moon Meets The Heart Of Leo
And The Lord Of The Rings And
Mars Is Super High At Sunset"

Horkheimer: On Tuesday the 18th a gibbous Moon, the heart star of Leo and the lord of the rings line up in a row. Just after sunset face east and you'll see an exquisite gibbous, that is humped shaped, Moon lined up with Regulus, Leo's brightest star, and planet #7 Saturn. On the next night the Moon will have moved below them and on Thursday the 20th, the first day of spring, it will be almost full. But ta da! On Friday the 21st we'll be treated to a magnificent full Moon, which has several wonderful names. Among which are the Paschal Moon, the Sap Moon, the Crow Moon, and yeecch! the Worm Moon. Don't miss the big line up and the first full Moon of spring. Keep looking up!


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Wednesday 2/20/08 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0809, 0810, 0811, 0812, 0813


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



"Star Gazer" is available for downloading
with Quicktime as well as RealPlayer streaming video.

 Click Here

 Click Here

 Click Here

STAR GAZER

Episode # 08-11 / 1580th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 3/17/2008 through Sunday 3/23/2008

"A Pithy Poem For The First Day Of Spring"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Since spring officially begins this week I'd like to share my favorite springtime poem with you. "Spring has sprung, the grass has riz, I wonder where the birdies is." O.K., I didn't say it was a great poem. It's just one I remember from my childhood in Wisconsin because my cousin Mark Cody who still lives in the badger state and I would compete to see who would see the first robin of spring. And although the robin's return to northern climes and the greening of the grass are unofficial indicators that spring has arrived, the official beginning of spring is actually an astronomical moment in time. In fact spring for the northern hemisphere begins at the precise moment our Sun crosses and lies smack dab on the celestial equator. And that moment this year is 1:48 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time Thursday March 20th. But what, you ask, does this Sun on the celestial equator stuff mean exactly? Let me explain.

O.K., for simplicity's sake imagine that we can take our Earth's equator and extend it way out into space so that it draws a line completely around the night sky dividing the heavens into two halves, the northern celestial hemisphere and the southern celestial hemisphere. Now if we could dim our Sun down and keep track of it's position against the background of stars day after day all year long we would notice that on the first day of spring it is smack dab on the celestial equator. But we would also notice that each successive day it slowly moves farther north along an imaginary path until on the first day of summer it reaches its highest point above the celestial equator. Then it moves a little bit farther south every day and on the first day of autumn is once again smack dab on the celestial equator. Thereafter it continues to travel a little bit farther south of the equator each day until it reaches its southernmost point on the first day of winter. And then, you guessed it, it slowly starts to move a little bit farther north again each day until on the first day of spring it is once again smack dab on the celestial equator, which happens this week.

But even if it doesn't feel like spring where you live there is one way you can tell that spring is here if you're driving on a due east ­ west highway because on the first day of spring and autumn the Sun always rises due east and sets due west. Which means that if you're driving to work at sunrise this week the Sun will rise directly in front of you over the highway and if you're driving west at sunset will set directly over the highway. So put those sun visors down and keep an eye out for the first robin! Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.

 


"Star Gazer" is available for downloading
with Quicktime as well as RealPlayer streaming video.

Check Out WPBT's Version

 Click Here

 Click Here

 Click Here

 Click Here

Star Gazer Minute

#08-11 M

3/17/2008 thru 3/23/2008

"A Pithy Poem For The First Day Of Spring"

Horkheimer: Spring in the northern hemisphere officially begins this week on Thursday March 20th. The first moment of spring is actually an astronomical event and is the precise moment our Sun crosses the celestial equator which is 1:48 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time Thursday the 20th. And if you drive to and from work on a due east ­ west highway this week you may notice an unusual effect because all week long the Sun will rise almost due east and set almost due west, directly in front of you over the highway. So if you drive due east at sunrise or due west at sunset put your sun glasses on and your sun visors down to avoid any 'spring ­ week' fender benders. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Wednesday 2/20/08 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0809, 0810, 0811, 0812, 0813


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



"Star Gazer" is available for downloading
with Quicktime as well as RealPlayer streaming video.

 Click Here

 Click Here

 Click Here

STAR GAZER

Episode # 08-12 / 1581st Show

To Be Aired : Monday 3/24/2008 through Sunday 3/30/2008

"Leo The Lion Chases Orion"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. It's that time of year again when the night skies almost shout, "spring is here" because Leo the Lion is chasing Orion and replacing him as the major constellation for early evening viewers. Let me show you.

Now most of you know that Orion the Hunter is winter's most famous star pattern. Indeed if you go outside in early evening in December Orion is climbing up the eastern skies as a celestial announcement of the imminent arrival of winter. And in January and February when winter is coldest Orion reaches his highest point in the heavens in early evening almost bragging that he is master of the season. But then things begin to change because all through March Orion slowly relinquishes his high flying position in early evening and by the beginning of April is tipped over on his side in the southwest, almost hanging on to the sky for dear life. And it is this position of Orion in the southwest heavens in early evening that always tells us that winter is coming to an end.

And although I am always sad to see Orion's bright stars go, nevertheless a much bigger although less bright constellation takes his place almost overhead in early evening, Leo the Lion, roaring that he is master now and that he and he alone will dominate spring's skies. In fact if you go out any night in late March or April in early evening you will see leo casually reclining almost overhead just as the ancient Egyptians depicted him in a regal sphinx-like position, very self assured that winter and Orion will soon be history. His head and forequarters are indicated by a backward question mark with the bright blue-white star Regulus marking his heart. His rear is marked by a triangle of stars and it is here that we find Leo's second brightest star Denebola.

Now in ancient times lions were often associated with royalty. In fact Leo's brightest star Regulus means "the little king". But little it is not. Some latest measurements indicate that it is more than four and a half times the diameter of our almost one million mile wide Sun. But because it is a much hotter star it is 140 times brighter! And because it is a whopping 80 light years away, when we look at Regulus this spring we see the light that left it 80 years ago. And although Denebola is twice as close, only 40 light years away, and half as big as Regulus, it is much cooler than Regulus, only 14 times brighter than our sun, which is why it appears dimmer than Regulus. Even so if we moved either Denebola or Regulus as close to Earth as our Sun is we'd all be crispy critters.

So welcome in springtime the cosmic way. Simply go outside in early evening any night in late march and April, look toward the southwest and you'll see Orion on his way out and then look almost overhead and you'll see Leo the Lion, the king of spring. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


"Star Gazer" is available for downloading
with Quicktime as well as RealPlayer streaming video.

Check Out WPBT's Version

 Click Here

 Click Here

 Click Here

 Click Here

Star Gazer Minute

#08-12 M

3/24/2008 thru 3/30/2008

"Leo The Lion Chases Orion"

Horkheimer: You can tell that spring is here because Leo the Lion is chasing Orion. In early evening look southwest and you'll see winter's superstar Orion the Hunter getting ready to exit and making way for Leo the king of spring. Reclining like a giant cosmic sphinx, almost overhead, Leo's two brightest stars put our Sun to shame. His heart star Regulus is 1 and 1/2 times bigger and 140 times brighter, whereas Leo's tail star Denebola is twice as big as our Sun and 14 times brighter. So if we moved Denebola or Regulus to where our Sun is we'd all be crispy critters. Say farewell to Orion and hello to the lion. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer



STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Wednesday 2/20/08 1000 to 1100
Includes episodes 0809, 0810, 0811, 0812, 0813


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



"Star Gazer" is available for downloading
with Quicktime as well as RealPlayer streaming video.

 Click Here

 Click Here

 Click Here

STAR GAZER

Episode # 08-13 / 1582nd Show

To Be Aired : Monday 3/31/2008 through Sunday 4/06/2008

"April 8th's Occult Occurrence: Watch The Moon
Hide The Seven Sisters"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and mark Tuesday night April 8th as the night when a cosmic occult occurrence will occur. That's because whenever one object in the heavens passes directly in front of another object and hides it from view we call such an event an occultation because the word occult comes from the word to hide. And next Tuesday April 8th in early evening an exquisite crescent Moon complete with earthshine will indeed pass over the fabled star cluster the Seven Sisters and occult them, that is hide them from view for a brief time. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for Tuesday evening April 8th just after dark facing west where you will see an exquisite 3 day old crescent Moon complete with earthshine. Now in case you've forgotten what earthshine is, simply keep in mind that the Moon does not make its own light but shines by reflected sunlight. So the bright part of the crescent Moon you'll be seeing is sunlight bouncing directly off the Moon and back to Earth. However when the Moon is a crescent it frequently looks like there's a dark full Moon nestled within this crescent. And we call this earthshine because it is light from the sun bouncing off our Earth onto the unlit portion of the Moon and back again. And believe me the crescent Moon with earthshine is always a beautiful sight.

But on this night if you look close by you will see several stars bunched up together in a group, the tiny cluster of stars known for thousands of years as the Seven Sisters, The Pleiades. And this evening from many places across the North American continent Moon watchers will be able to see the Moon slowly pass over and hide several of the sisters' stars from view. And although this will look fabulous with the naked eye, I strongly encourage you to use a pair of binoculars because not only will the Moon with earthshine look great but you'll also see dozens more stars in this cluster which is actually a group of about 100 stars, 407 light years away, which means the light we'll see next week left these stars 407 years ago in 1601, only 9 years before Galileo was the first to use a telescope to discover the extra` sisters.

Now I strongly suggest that you start watching at dusk just before it gets completely dark out and have a fairly clear flat horizon because the Moon and The Pleiades will set about three hours after dusk. And as it gets darker you can look to the left of the Moon and The Pleiades and you'll see the dim v-shaped group of stars called the Hyades which mark the face of Taurus the bull. In fact Taurus' red eye star Aldebaran should easily catch your attention as will Betelgeuse the red shoulder star of Orion the Hunter and the red planet Mars which on Friday April 11th will be visited by a wonderful first quarter Moon. So get thee out next Tuesday night and why not share this occult occurrence with a friend? Da-da da-da da-da da-da. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


 

"Star Gazer" is available for downloading
with Quicktime as well as RealPlayer streaming video.

Check Out WPBT's Version

 Click Here

 Click Here

 Click Here

 Click Here

Star Gazer Minute

#08-13 M

3/31/2008 thru 4/06/2008

"April 8th's Occult Occurrence: Watch The Moon
Hide The Seven Sisters"


Horkheimer: On Tuesday night April 8th a cosmic occult occurrence will occur. Just after dark face west and you'll see an exquisite crescent Moon complete with earthshine which looks like a dark full Moon nestled within it and just above it a star cluster called the Seven Sisters, the Pleiades. Then for the next 2 1/2 hours watch the Moon slowly occult, that is pass over and hide, several of these celestial siblings. Use binoculars and you'll see there are more than Seven Sisters here, about 100. And keep in mind that the light you see next Tuesday left these stars 407 years ago in 1601, nine years before Galileo was the first to use a telescope to discover the extra sisters. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


[SmilinJack]Return to the [STAR GAZER Main Page]