STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One Hour Feed STAH 809
Friday February 20, 2009, 1100-1200
Includes episodes 0909, 0910, 0911, 0912, 0913


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

 

"Star Gazer" is available for downloading
with Quicktime.

 Click Here

 Click Here

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 09-09 / 1630th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 3/02/2009 through
Sunday 3/08/2009

"Saturn At Its Closest, Biggest And Brightest For 2009 And A Many-Named Moon Pays It And Regulus A Visit"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. And yes indeed this weekend is the big weekend because on Sunday March 8th the wonderful ringed planet Saturn will be officially at opposition and this means that it will be at its closest, biggest and brightest for the entire year. Plus it will be paid a visit by a Moon of many names, which will also visit the heart of Leo the Lion.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Sunday evening March 8th about an hour after sunset facing east where you will see a dazzling almost full Moon which when it becomes officially full will be a Moon of many names, among which are the Sap Moon, the Lenten Moon, the Crow Moon and yecch! The Worm Moon! Which leads one to wonder could a crow Moon ever eat a Worm Moon?

At any rate just below the Moon you should see Regulus, which is the brightest star of the constellation Leo the Lion. The front part of Leo is marked by stars, which if we connect by lines looks like a sickle or a backwards question mark. The rear part of Leo is marked by three stars, which if we connect by lines forms a perfect right triangle. And it is just off to the side of this rear triangle where we see yellowish Saturn at its brightest and closest for the year.

So on Sunday night use the Moon to find Regulus just below it and 24 hours later on Monday night use the Moon to find Regulus just above it. And then on Tuesday when the Moon is officially full it will be next to Saturn and you'll be able to watch the two of them glide together across the sky all night long side by side.

And that is because all full Moons are visible all night long from sunset to sunrise plus whenever a planet is at opposition it too is always visible all night long from sunset to sunrise. So just after sunset look for them side by side in the east and then watch them climb the heavens hour after hour. They will reach their highest point between midnight and 1 a.m., after which they will slowly descend side by side toward the western horizon, setting just as the Sun gets ready to rise.

Now if you've got a small telescope you may be surprised at Saturn's appearance because instead of seeing it with its rings in very dramatic fashion, Saturn's rings will be almost invisible. And that's because this year they are presenting themselves almost edge on to us, which makes Saturn look much less compelling than usual. This happens approximately every 14 to 15 years, but there is a silver lining to not seeing the rings because whenever they are wide open they reflect so much light that it's difficult to see the innermost of Saturn's 52 Moons. So amateur telescope users have a better chance of seeing more of Saturn's Moons this year, the brightest of which, 3200 mile wide Titan, is always easy to find and which is 1 1/2 times bigger than our Moon. So get thee out to see the lord-of-less-rings- than-usual and the blue-white heart of Leo the Lion. Keep looking up!

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Star Gazer Minute

#09-09 M

3/02/2009 thru 3/08/2009

"Saturn At Its Closest, Biggest And Brightest For 2009 And A Many-Named Moon Pays It And Regulus A Visit"

Horkheimer: On Sunday March 8th the ringed planet Saturn is at opposition and closest, biggest and brightest for the year and you can use the Moon to find it. Just after sunset face east and an almost full Moon will be parked just above the heart star of Leo the Lion Regulus and about two fists below them you'll see yellowish Saturn. On Monday the Moon will be just below Regulus and on Tuesday the full Moon and Saturn will be side by side and you'll be able to watch them travel together across the sky all night long. They'll reach their highest point around midnight and hours later will set in the west as the Sun rises in the east. Through a telescope Saturn's rings will appear almost edge on. But you should be able to see its giant moon Titan which is 1 1/2 times bigger than our Moon! Keep looking up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One Hour Feed STAH 809
Friday February 20, 2009, 1100-1200
Includes episodes 0909, 0910, 0911, 0912, 0913


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


"Star Gazer" is available for downloading
with Quicktime.

 Click Here

 Click Here

STAR GAZER

Episode #09-10 /1631st Show
To Be Aired : Monday 3/09/2009 through Sunday 3/15/2009

"Happy First Day Of Spring!
And Happy New Year, Ben And George!"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Next week on Friday March 20th at exactly 7:44 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time or your local equivalent the Sun will lie smack dab on the celestial equator which marks the very first moment of the beginning of spring for the northern hemisphere and the first moment of autumn for the southern hemisphere, so happy spring to you northerners and happy autumn to you southerners. But if you're a really oldie goldie may I also wish you a very happy 'old' New Year. Let me explain.

O.K. Now if someone asked you why is spring called spring? Would you be able to give them a good answer? Well simply put, we use the word spring to mark the beginning of the new season because it is an abbreviation for the phrases 'spring of the leaf' and 'spring of the year'. Now 'spring of the leaf' is pretty obvious because at this time of the year in the northern hemisphere leaves literally do spring up out of branches and grass and flowers spring up out of the ground. And that's why we call spring, spring. But do you know why we also call this time the spring of the year?

Well before 1752 in England and America the new year officially began when spring began on March 25th. Or to put it quite simply the New Year sprang up at the same time the leaves and the grass did. In fact when George Washington and Ben Franklin were young whipper snappers they and all American colonists wished each other Happy New Year and happy spring on the same day on March 25th until English parliament declared that beginning in 1752 the new year would no longer begin in March but would be celebrated on January 1st, a tradition begun by the Romans in 153 B.C.

But, lest we forget, the first day of spring is strictly speaking an astronomical event which marks one of the two days when our Sun is smack dab on the celestial equator, the other date being the first day of autumn. You see these are the only two days of the year when the Sun rises exactly due east and sets due west and was just one of several astronomical signposts our ancient ancestors used to help them determine the seasons which was very important for their planting schedules. Today the first day of spring barely gets a passing mention in the media.

But you can see for yourself just how dramatic the arrival of spring is visually if you drive to or from work on a due east / west highway at sunset and sunrise. Because on the first day of spring and autumn the Sun will rise and set directly over the yellow line in the middle of the road, and blindingly so. Try it yourself. Starting early next week if you go to work around sunrise on a due east highway notice how close the Sun rises to the center of the road. Then on Friday, the first day of spring, watch it rise directly over the yellow line. Plus vice versa, watch the Sun set directly over the yellow line which means you better get out your sun glasses or put your sun visors down. Happy first day of spring, happy old New Year and keep looking up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Star Gazer" is available for downloading
with Quicktime.

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 Click Here

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Star Gazer Minute

#09-10 M

3/09/2009 thru 3/15/2009

"Happy First Day Of Spring!
And Happy New Year, Ben And George!"

Horkheimer: Spring officially begins next Friday March 20th. You see the first moment of spring is the precise moment our Sun crosses the celestial equator, which this year is 7:44 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time but the Sun crosses the celestial equator not only on the first day of spring but also on the first day of autumn which makes for a strange phenomenon. Because on these two days only the Sun will rise exactly due east and set due west which means that if you are driving to work at sunrise on a due east highway the Sun will rise directly over the yellow line in the middle of the road. And will also set directly over the yellow line. And if it doesn't your highway is not true due east and west. So put those sun visors down next Friday and keep looking up!


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One Hour Feed STAH 809
Friday February 20, 2009, 1100-1200
Includes episodes 0909, 0910, 0911, 0912, 0913


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


"Star Gazer" is available for downloading
with Quicktime.

 Click Here

 Click Here

STAR GAZER

Episode # 09-11 / 1632nd Show

To Be Aired : Monday 3/16/2009 through Sunday 3/22/2009

"How To Find Planets #4 And #5 With Satellite #1
Plus Planet #2 Masquerades As Both
The Evening And The Morning Star"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. On March 22nd, 23rd and 24th you'll be able to find planets #4 and #5 using Earth's largest natural satellite which up until October 4th 1957, when Sputnik was launched as the first artificial satellite, was Earth's only satellite. Plus on the 24th, 25th and 26th you may be able to see planet #2 appear as both the morning and evening star.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for Sunday morning March 22nd about half an hour before sunrise while it's getting a little bit light out facing east southeast where you should be able to see a very slim waning, that is shrinking, crescent Moon. And just slightly below and to its left planet #5 from the Sun, the king of the planets itself, 88,000 mile wide Jupiter, which always looks wonderful through even a super cheap small telescope. Because you can watch the ever constant ballet of its four largest natural satellites, three of which are larger than our own satellite.

But if it's cloudy out on Sunday you can still use the Moon as a Jupiter finder on Monday when an even skinnier Moon will have moved almost the same distance to the other side of Jupiter and will be on its way to meet planet #4, the reddish-gold 4,000 mile wide Mars, which will be very close to the horizon. But if you can't find Mars on Monday, 24 hours later on Tuesday an even skinnier crescent Moon will be parked just above and to the left of it.

Once again Sunday the Moon is to the right of Jupiter, Monday to Jupiter's left and Tuesday just above Mars. And now for the challenging part. On Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, the 24th, 25th and 26th, if you look as far to the left of Mars as Jupiter is to its right, extremely close to the horizon you may be able to see a very bright light for ten minutes or so. And that is planet #2, 8,000 mile wide Venus which whenever we see it just before sunrise is called the morning star but aha! Here is where the fun comes in, because if you go outside just after sunset on the 24th, 25th and 26th and look west and have a very clear flat unobstructed horizon you may also be able to see Venus, which whenever it is seen just after sunset is called the evening star. In fact this is a rare opportunity to see planet #2 as both the evening star and the morning star on the same day, 3 days in a row. And this happens only once every 8 years!

But it gets even better because on those three days you may also actually be able to see the crescent shape of Venus with the naked eye. Remember Venus goes through phases just like our Moon but only once every 8 years do we have the chance to see it as a crescent without binoculars or a telescope. Of course you have to have really good eyesight. Or you can try looking at it through a pinhole in a piece of paper, which may help you see it better. At least that's what astronomy writer Fred Schaaf advises because he has already done it. So there you have it planet #2 as the evening and morning star plus planets #4 and #5 get a visit from our Moon. Keep looking up!


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"Star Gazer" is available for downloading
with Quicktime.

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 Click Here

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Star Gazer Minute

#09-11 M

3/16/2009 thru 3/22/2009

"How To Find Planets #4 And #5 With Satellite #1
Plus Planet #2 Masquerades As Both
The Evening And The Morning Star"

Horkheimer: Planet #2 makes a double appearance and you can find numbers 4 and 5 with the Moon. On March 22nd just before sunrise face southeast and an exquisite crescent Moon will be parked just above #5 Jupiter. On the 23rd just below it and on the 24th just above #4 Mars. But also on the 24th, 25th and 26th dazzling Venus will do something which only happens once every 8 years. It will make a brief appearance as both the morning star just before sunrise and as the evening star just after sunset. Plus if you have super good vision you may actually see Venus looking like a tiny crescent Moon. It will help if you try looking at it through a pinhole in a piece of paper. See Venus as the morning and evening star and use the Moon to find Jupiter and Mars. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

One Hour Feed STAH 809
Friday February 20, 2009, 1100-1200
Includes episodes 0909, 0910, 0911, 0912, 0913


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



"Star Gazer" is available for downloading
with Quicktime.

 Click Here

 Click Here

STAR GAZER

Episode # 09-12 / 1633rd Show

To Be Aired : Monday 3/23/2009 through Sunday 3/29/2009

"How To Find The Two Brightest Red Stars
Which Are Visible Right Now!"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. And yes you heard right, stars do come in different colors. And the two brightest red ones can be seen very close to each other right now. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for any night the last two weeks of March and first two weeks of April about an hour after sunset facing southwest where almost everyone's second favorite star pattern is clearly visible. Most people's favorite is comprised of the seven stars, which make up the Big Dipper which is visible in the northeast right now.

But the second favorite is comprised of the seven bright stars in Orion the Hunter. Three bright stars in a row mark his belt. Two bright stars mark his knees and two bright stars his shoulders. And all but one of them looks white to the naked eye. Only the bright shoulder star named Betelgeuse looks different and glows a bright red. And it is the brighter of the two brightest red stars we can see with the naked eye.

The second brightest is just off to the right of Orion and is the brightest star in a group of stars which make kind of a v shape. Named Aldebaran it is the fierce red eye of Taurus the bull upon whose shoulders ride the exquisite little star group known as the Seven Sisters. And legend has it that they're perched on his shoulder because he is protecting them from the overly amorous intentions of Orion who was somewhat of a notorious ancient womanizer. At any rate if you compare Aldebaran and Betelgeuse's colors you'll notice that they are both red but each a different shade. And there their similarity ends. Indeed although they look very much alike they are very, much different.

Now you may recall that we measure the distance to stars not in miles but in terms of the speed of light. Light travels 186,000 miles per second so our Moon which is about 1/4 of a million miles away is about 1 1/3 light seconds away, which means that it takes 1 1/3 seconds for light to travel from our Moon to our Earth. So we always see the Moon, not as it exists now, but as it existed 1 1/3 seconds ago. Aldebaran on the other hand is incredibly much farther away. In fact it takes its light 65 years to reach Earth. So we say it is 65 light years away which also means we always see Aldebaran not as it exists now but as it existed 65 years ago. Wow!

Betelgeuse however is 8 times farther away, 520 light years which means that we always see Betelgeuse as it existed 520 years ago, before Christopher Columbus set sail. Double wow! But it gets even better because if we compare these two red stars with our million mile wide yellow Sun we discover that Aldebaran is 36 times wider. And it gets even better because Betelgeuse is a variable star, and changes its size like a gigantic cosmic heart. When it's fully contracted it is a whopping 600 times as wide as our Sun but when it is fully expanded it is 900 times as wide. Holy moley!

So get thee out just after sunset, look southwest and see the two brightest red stars in the sky, the shoulder of Orion and the eye of Taurus. And believe me that's no bull. Keep looking up!


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Star Gazer Minute

#09-12 M

3/23/2009 thru 3/29/2009

"How To Find The Two Brightest Red Stars'
Which Are Visible Right Now!"

Horkheimer: The two brightest red stars we can see from Earth are visible right now. An hour after sunset face southwest and you'll see the seven stars which make up Orion the Hunter. The shoulder star named Betelgeuse is the brightest, the second brightest, to the right of Orion, named Aldebaran, is the fierce red eye of Taurus the bull. And although Aldebaran and Betelgeuse look alike they are very different. It takes 65 years for light to reach us from Aldebaran, but it takes 520 years to reach us from Betelgeuse. And although Aldebaran is a whopping 36 times wider than our million mile wide Sun, Betelgeuse changes its size from 600 times as wide as our Sun to 900 times as wide. Holy moley! So get thee out to see these two red rogues yourself keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer



STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

One Hour Feed STAH 809
Friday February 20, 2009, 1100-1200
Includes episodes 0909, 0910, 0911, 0912, 0913


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



"Star Gazer" is available for downloading
with Quicktime.

 Click Here

 Click Here

STAR GAZER

Episode # 09-13 / 1634th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 3/30/2009 through Sunday 4/05/2009

"Our Annual 'Fun And Games With The Big Dipper' Demo"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Every April I like to remind you of why one of the most famous seasonal phrases may have a cosmic connection with the Big Dipper and how to use the Big Dipper as a spring star finder. Let me show you.

O.K. We've got our skies set up for any night in April between the hours of 8 and 10 p.m. looking due north where you'll see the Big Dipper almost directly above and just to the right of the north star, its cup pointed down in such a way that if it were filled full of water the water would be pouring out directly onto the ground below which gives a celestial significance to that old saying "April showers bring May flowers". Because every April in early evening the biggest water dipper of the heavens is indeed positioned so that it is pouring its imaginary water onto the Earth below.

Plus because it's so high above the horizon it makes it very easy to use the three stars of the Dipper's handle as a finder to locate two wonderful stars of spring which are also very high above the horizon. Simply draw an imaginary line through the handle of the Big Dipper and extend it in the same curve or arc as the handle and you'll "arc to Arcturus", the brightest star of bootes the herdsman. Then if you extend that curve, that 'arc', on from Arcturus you can speed on to Spica, the brightest star of Virgo, the virgin. Once again using the handle and its curve, arc to Arcturus then speed on to Spica. What could be easier?

Now brighter Arcturus is relatively close only 37 light years away. And since there are 6 trillion miles in one light year that means Arcturus is 222 trillion miles away. Spica, however, is 7 times farther away than Arcturus 260 light years or 1,560 trillion miles, which is just a little difficult to comprehend. So to make it easier to understand just how far away they are, think of it this way. Instead of thinking in miles, think in terms of time because when we look at them now we are really looking back in time. You see when astronomers say that Arcturus is 37 light years away they really mean that when you look at Arcturus this month you are not seeing Arcturus as it actually exists now in the present but as it actually existed and looked 37 years ago in 1972, four years before America's Bicentennial. Wow!

And when you speed on to Spica and look at it this month you are also seeing Spica not as it exists now but as it actually existed 260 years ago in 1749, 27 years before the Declaration of Independence was signed, double wow! Which inevitably leads one to the question, "is it possible that some of the stars we now see are no longer in existence?' the answer is, yes. Although we are quite sure Arcturus and Spica are still there. So some time this April between 8 and 10 p.m. find the Big Dipper as it rains down April showers for May flowers, then arc to Arcturus 37 light years away and speed on to Spica 260 light years beyond! Keep looking up!


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"Star Gazer" is available for downloading
with Quicktime.

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Star Gazer Minute

#09-13 M

3/30/2009 thru 4/05/2009

"Our Annual 'Fun And Games With The Big Dipper' Demo"

Horkheimer: Every April it's time to play the Big Dipper game. Between 8 and 10 p.m. look north and the Big Dipper will be high above the North Star. If you use the Dipper's handle you can find two wonderful stars of spring. Simply draw an imaginary line through the handle in the same curve or arc and you arc to brilliant Arcturus. Extend that line and you can then speed on to Spica. Arcturus is so far away we see the light that left it 37 years ago so we see it not as it exists now but as it existed in 1972, four years before America's Bicentennial. Spica however is so much farther away we see it as it existed 260 years ago in 1749, 27 years before the Declaration of Independence. Wow! So arc to Arcturus, then speed on to Spica. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


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