STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half Hour Feed STAH 1009
Wednesday February 16, 2011, 1230-1300/SD06
Includes episodes 1110, 1111, 1112, 1113


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 11-10 / 1735th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 3/7/2011 through
Sunday 3/13/2011

"The Biggest Full Moon In 18 Years! Plus Jupiter and Mercury Have A Super Scoochy"


Dean: Hey there stargazers I'm Dean Regas from the Cincinnati Observatory and I'll be your guest host this month on Star Gazer and I've got a load of astro goodies for you this time. Let's start with the badly misnamed Daylight Saving Time returning on Sunday March 13th, then pinkish Mercury pays a close visit to giant Jupiter on Monday and Tuesday March 14 and 15th plus we'll have the closest and biggest full Moon in 18 years next week on Sat-urday March 19th. And finally the Vernal Equinox, the beginning of spring, will occur at 7:21 p.m. Eastern Time on Sunday March 20th.

Daylight Saving Time, which should more prop-erly be called Daylight Shifting Time, kicks in at 2 a.m. Sunday the 13th. Remember the old saw, "Spring forward, Fall back"? You reset your clock by an hour but no daylight is actually saved, no more extra daylight is actually created, it's just shifted from the morning to the evening. There is no cue in nature for doing this, it is just at the whim of Congress. But while you're out there enjoying that extra daylight at the end of your day look low in the west right after the Sun sets and as the sky gets darker you'll see the closest evening planet-pairing of 2011. Let me show you.

Next week on Monday March 14 about 45 minutes after sunset look low in the west and you should see two bright star-like lights low not far above the hori-zon. The pink planet Mercury will be about 2 1/2 degrees down and to the right of much brighter Jupiter. The next night Tuesday the 15th, same time, same direction, Mercury will be even closer to Jupiter and a bit higher. Mercury will continue to climb higher each night for the next two weeks while Jupiter will drop lower each night and will soon be gone from eve-ning skies. Now remember that even though Mercury and Jupiter appear to be very close together in the sky, they are really hundreds of millions of miles apart. Mercury will be much, much closer to you, a bit over 100 million miles away while Jupiter will be almost 5 1/2 times farther away, 548 million miles away. Another way to think of it is that next Tuesday the 15th the sunlight reflecting from Mercury will take 9 minutes to cross the solar system so you can see it, while the sunlight bouncing off Jupiter will take 49 minutes to get here.

Now next Sat-urday the 19th you'll be treated to the closest and biggest full Moon of 2011. It's not only the closest full Moon for this year but it will be the closest and biggest full Moon since March 8, 1993! Plus it will be the biggest full Moon you'll see for the next five years, until November 14, 2016. What exactly is meant by that term "Full Moon?" Most of the time people say that a full Moon is a big, round, fully illuminated Moon and the Moon looks like this for several days each month. Well we're a bit more finicky with the definition of the word "Full Moon". In astronomy "Full Moon" means that the Moon's apparent geocentric ecliptic longitude is 180 degrees more than the Sun's apparent geocentric ecliptic longitude. Whew! Quite a mouth full huh? Well simply put this means the Moon is on the other side of the sky from the Sun as seen from Earth. This definition allows us to determine the exact time for Full Moon. One minute before and it's not quite full and one minute after and it's all over until next month. But why is the Moon a different size at different full Moons?

Well the Moon's path in its orbit around the Earth is not quite a circle. The Moon averages about 240,000 miles from Earth but can get as close as 221,441 miles and as far as 252,723 miles. That's a range of over 30,000 miles. So a full Moon can be very close, such as the one next week or it can be 30,000 miles farther away like the farthest and smallest full Moon for this year which will be on October 11. Nothing about the Moon's orbit repeats exactly so the distance of the full Moon shrinks and expands over a period of roughly 14 months and they are not all the same. The last time we had a full Moon closer than this one was in March of 1993 and the next time will be in November 2016. So be sure to see this extremely close full Moon and don't miss Jupiter and Mercury at their closest and remember to keep looking up

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#11-10 M

3/07/2011 thru 3/13/2011

"The Biggest Full Moon In 18 Years! Plus Jupiter and Mercury Have A Super Scoochy"

Dean: Daylight Saving Time, kicks in at 2 a.m. Sunday the 13th. Remember, "Spring for-ward, Fall back"? Then pinkish Mercury pays a close visit to giant Jupiter on March 14 and 15th plus we'll have the closest and biggest full Moon in 18 years next week on March 19th. And finally spring, will begin at 7:21 pm Eastern Time on March 20th. Let me show you. On March 14 about 45 minutes after sunset look low in the west and you'll see two bright star-like lights not far above the horizon. Mercury will be below and to the right of much brighter Jupiter. The next night Mercury will be closer to Jupiter and a bit higher. Then next Saturday the 19th you'll be have the closest and biggest full Moon of 2011. Catch this extremely close full Moon and don't miss Jupiter and Mercury at their closest. Remember to keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half Hour Feed STAH 1009
Wednesday February 16, 2011, 1230-1300/SD06
Includes episodes 1110, 1111, 1112, 1113


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode #11-11 /1736th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 3/14/2011 through Sunday 3/20/2011

"Finding Direction In The Night Sky"


Dean: Hey there stargazers, I'm Dean Regas, outreach astronomer for the Cincinnati Ob-servatory and I'll be your guest host this month on star gazer. Are you seeking direction in your life? The stars can help - well, at least they can tell you the difference between north and south. This week, we'll focus on the dimmer stars and constellations in the northern sky and contrast them with the blazingly bright stars in the southern sky. Along the way, I'll share my tip to find Polaris, the North Star. Here let me show you.

Polaris is the guide of travelers, stargazers, and all-around lovers of the night. It twinkles at the end of the Little Dipper's handle or the Little Bear's outrageously long tail. Contrary to popular opinion, the North Star is not the brightest star in the sky. That honor belongs to Sir-ius, the dog star. In fact, Polaris ranks about 48th in brightness and through the light pollu-tion of civilization, it's just barely visible. Well, what makes Polaris so darned special?

Polaris resides almost directly over our north pole. So as the Earth rotates causing day and night and the daily motions of all the stars and planets, the North Star barely moves. That means all night this star shines in the northern sky making it the perfect stellar sentinel.as the world turns and the night goes on, the stars appear to rotate in a counterclockwise mo-tion. This motion gives us the appearance that the sky spins once a day with a pivot point at Polaris. Stars like the Big Dipper and Cassiopeia circle around the north star while things farther south rise in the east and set in the west. Of course it's the Earth that's spinning not the sky!

Since the Little Dipper has some very faint stars, finding the North Star can be tough. But never fear - the other dipper is here! The Big Dipper is much more distinct and can be seen even from urban areas. You can find the Big Dipper standing on its handle in the early eve-ning. The ancient Greeks and some native American groups both called these stars a big bear. Now the Big Dipper is only the rear end and tail of the bear. But have you ever seen a bear with a tail like that? It looks more like a raccoon to me. Native American legends de-scribe a strong hunter flinging this momma bear into the sky by her tail. The poor thing really got stretched out! The baby bear got the same treatment and was flung up to the stars to be near his mother. So tonight at 9:30 use the more notable stars of the Big Dipper as pointers.

Connect the dots of the two stars at the end of the Big Dipper's spoon. Continue that line down to the left and bingo they'll point you right to Polaris. We're not done with the Big Dip-per's pointer stars yet. If you go from the Big Dipper to the North Star, keep going, because you will run into the bottom of a "w" shaped constellation. This is Cassiopeia the queen. Can you see the beautiful, boastful queen sitting on her throne? Well anyway, I picture these stars as her crown glittering in the northwestern sky. But Cassiopeia is easy to find as you hop across the heavens. The distance between the Big Dipper and Polaris is the same as the distance from Polaris to Cassiopeia.

Now let's turn around and face south. Wow, there are the bright stars! You can see the brightest of them all half-way above the southern horizon. That's Sirius the dog star which marks the nose of Canis Major, Orion's big dog. Sirius is about 23 times brighter than the North Star and scorches the winter sky with a stark white light.

Up higher, but not quite as bright is the little dog star, Procyon. Procyon is one of two visible stars in Canis Minor, the little dog. Only two stars? That's right, this is a real hot dog! Higher still are two equally bright stars of differing colors. These are the heads of the Gemini twins, Pollux and Castor. With a good imagination and a dark sky you may be able to make out the bodies and feet of the twins down and to the right of their heads. These four stars, Sirius, Procyon, Pollux and Castor make up the Sirius curve of bright stars arcing up from the southern horizon.

Now that you can find the Polaris, and tell the difference between the northern and southern sky you'll never be lost again! Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#11-11 M

3/14/2011 thru 3/20/2011

"Finding Direction In The Night Sky"

Dean: Are you seeking direction in your life? Well, the stars can help - at least they can point you north. This week, I'll share a tip to find Polaris, the North Star, in the evening sky. Let me show you.

Polaris is the guide of travelers, stargazers, and all-around lovers of the night. This beacon of a star is always in the north at the end of the Little Dipper's handle or the Little Bear's outrageously long tail. This is Ursa Minor, a very faint constellation. Contrary to popular opinion, the North Star is not the brightest star in the sky. In fact it ranks about 48th in brightness and through the city haze, it's just barely visible. So tonight at 9:30 use the more notable stars of the Big Dipper to guide you. Follow the two stars at the end of the Big Dipper's spoon and bingo they'll point you right to Polaris. Now that you can find the North Star, you'll never be lost again! Keep looking up!

Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half Hour Feed STAH 1009
Wednesday February 16, 2011, 1230-1300/SD06
Includes episodes 1110, 1111, 1112, 1113


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode # 11-12 / 1737th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 3/21/2011 through Sunday 3/27/2011

"Venus And The Moon At Dawn, PlusThe Zodiacal Light At Night"


Dean: Hey there stargazers, I'm Dean Regas, outreach astronomer for the Cincinnati Ob-servatory and I'll be your guest host this month on Star Gazer. Next week I've got some bright stuff for you in the morning and a faint, subtle light in the evening that I'll bet most of you have never seen. Almost a thousand years ago the Persian poet Omar Khayyam in his book of poetry called "The Rubaiyat" wrote his most famous line, "A jug of wine, A loaf of bread And thou beside me Singing in the wilderness". But elsewhere in "The Rubiyait" Omar made a poetic allusion to a mysterious "false dawn" as opposed to the real dawn, which can only be seen at a certain time of year. And happily next week is your best chance this year to see the evening version of this faint light, which I'll call "the false dusk." Next week is good because there will be no bright Moon light to wipe out this delicate astronomical phe-nomenon. Let me tell you all about it and what you have to do to find it.


O.K., if we could go way out into space and look down on our solar system with superhu-man vision, we would notice a faint yet vast cloud of cosmic dust extending outward from the Sun in the plane of the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth and slightly beyond. And while one would expect it would be impossible to see this super faint cloud from Earth, neverthe-less in March, in the evening, when the plane of our Earth's orbit is almost vertical to the ho-rizon, we can, under the right conditions.


And these conditions require that there is no bright Moon light out and that you must be far away from city lights because even the faintest Moonlight or urban lighting will wipe out the extremely delicate, ethereal glow of the false dusk. As a general rule if you can see the Milky Way from where you're observing you'll have a good chance to see this rare phe-nomenon next week. To see it, look toward the west about 2 hours after sunset. It will look like a wedge or cone-shaped dim patch of light about the same brightness as the Milky Way and it will extend from the horizon about one third to half way up to the zenith a ghostly, faintly glowing rounded pyramid of light.


Now the scientific name of this phenomenon is the Zodiacal Light and it's caused by sun-light reflected from all those trillions and trillions of dust particles which make up the great cosmic cloud. Additionally, if you ever see a similar oval-shaped glow directly overhead at midnight you would be seeing the zodiacal light's sister phenomenon called the Gegen-schein or counterglow. And I personally wonder whether any poet ever wrote about that. At any rate, remember that next week is your best chance to see the evening zodiacal light, which I admit is very elusive. But if you find it I think you'll know why it appeared in poetry centuries before it appeared in scientific writings.


Now for something a lot brighter but not as conveniently timed, look east before dawn next week and you'll have a chance to spot a fading crescent Moon having a close encounter with the brightest planet of them all. Monday March 28th about an hour before sunrise look east and just above the horizon you should find Venus if the clouds cooperate. Look up to its right for the 24 day old waning crescent Moon about 30 degrees away. The Moon will get closer to Venus each day. Tuesday the Moon will be a bit skinnier and a lot closer.

Then things really start to pick up on Wednesday. The Moon will be only 10 degrees away and getting skinnier. The best day will be will be Thursday with an extremely skinny, slender sliver of a Moon passing only 5 degrees above Venus. And keep in mind that even though they might look close together in the sky, that Venus is over 400 times farther away than the Moon. So get outside before sunrise next week to see the Moon and Venus or get out after sunset while there's no Moon, make sure you're far from city lights and see if you can see what inspired an ancient poet. I think you'll find it inspiring too. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#11-12 M

3/21/2011 thru 3/27/2011

"Venus And The Moon At Dawn, Plus The zodiacal Light At Night"


Dean: Next week the Moon will pass close to Venus in the morning sky and after sunset you have a chance to see 'the false dusk' if you're far from city lights because there will be no Moon to hide its faint glow.
Look west about 2 hours after sunset for a very dim cone shaped patch of light about the brightness of the Milky Way stretching from the horizon almost half way up in the sky. It is actually a humongous cloud of cosmic dust extending from the sun past Mercury and Venus and slightly beyond Earth. Astronomers call it the Zodiacal Light and next week is your best chance to see it. Then go out an hour before sunrise next Thursday and catch a glimpse of a super skinny Moon just above the brightest of the planets Venus. So see what inspired an ancient poet. I'm Dean Regas from the Cincinnati Observatory. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half Hour Feed STAH 1009
Wednesday February 16, 2011, 1230-1300/SD06
Includes episodes 1110, 1111, 1112, 1113


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode # 11-13 / 1738th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 3/28/2011 through Sunday 4/03/2011

"Arcturus And Saturn Join The Moon And The Pleiades For A Spring Evening Star Show"


DEAN: Hey there stargazers I'm Dean Regas from the Cincinnati Observatory and I'll be your guest host this month on Star Gazer. I'm sure many of you have been missing our gi-ant planet friend Jupiter since it dropped out of our evening skies recently. Well never fear because as one giant planet leaves the night sky another comes to take its place. And the Moon will put on quite a show next week as she visits the Seven Sisters. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for just after dark, any night next week, facing east. You'll notice two bright star like objects not far above the horizon. The brighter, slightly orangeish one to the left is a star, Arcturus in the constellation Bootes. The slightly dimmer, yellowish object to the right is a planet, the famed ringed planet Saturn. If you can't tell a planet from a star ask yourself, "Does it twinkle?" Stars will twinkle while planets won't. Try it for yourself. Saturn is not as bright as Arcturus and is visible only because it is reflecting light from our Sun. Arcturus is a Sun in its own right and is over 100 times brighter than our Sun. 37 light years away, Arcturus is much larger than our Sun, 25 times as wide as our star. Contrast that with puny Saturn, only 75,000 miles wide, if you don't count the rings. You'd have to line up nearly 300 Saturns side by side to get across Arcturus. Saturn will be directly oppo-site the Sun next week, which means it will be in the sky all night long.

Saturn is one of the best planets to look at through a small telescope because it has some-thing none of the other planets have, a set of visible rings. Mostly ice, the rings of Saturn add another 100 thousand miles to its apparent width. Even though they look very impres-sive the rings are unbelievably thin and when viewed edge on almost disappear. This last happened in September 2009 as the Earth was treated to what's called a "ring plane crossing" as the rings were edge on to us for a brief time. The rings are widening now and are about 8 degrees from edge on. The next ring plane crossing is on March 23, 2025. So be sure to mark your calendars so you don't miss it. Saturn will be in the evening sky all summer long and will make a great target for your small telescopes.

Now turn around and face west on Monday night April 4th just after sunset and you'll be greeted by a young one day old Moon. It should be a great opportunity to see the effect known as "The old Moon in the new Moon's arms". It's also called earthshine and what you'll see is a faint greyish image of the non-sunlit part of the Moon. This is caused by light from the Sun bouncing off the Earth then illuminating the Moon and then reflecting back down here for you to see,
quite a trip for a little sunbeam. It's no wonder it's tired and doesn't do much of a job of light-ing up the Moon.

Above the Moon you'll be able to see the Seven Sisters, the Pleiades. They are nearly gone from evening skies until they return next fall. The Moon will pass close by them next month but by then they will be so close to the Sun that you might not be able to see them. So be sure to do it now. Tuesday night at the same time the Moon will be higher and closer to the Pleiades and a bit fatter. Then on Wednesday evening the 3 day old Moon will be about 6 degrees below the Pleiades and this will be a beautiful sight with your naked eye or a pair of binoculars. Then the following evening the Moon will have gotten even fatter and higher in the sky and will be just to the right of the bright red star Aldebaran the eye of Taurus the bull. So Saturn and the Moon each have arranged to bring you something to see in the sky next week. Saturn and Arcturus will be in the eastern sky after sunset and the young Moon of April will lead you to a farewell view of the Pleiades, the Seven Sisters. Enjoy spring and keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#11-13 M

3/28/2011 thru 4/03/2011

"Arcturus And Saturn Join The Moon And The Pleiades For A Spring Evening Star Show"


Dean: The ringed planet Saturn is replacing Jupiter as the big planet in the evening sky and the Moon will put on quite a show next week as she visits the Seven Sisters. Let me show you.
O.K., we've got our skies set up for just after dark, any night next week, facing east. You'll notice two bright star like objects not far above the horizon. The brighter one to the left is a star, Arcturus and the slightly dimmer, yellowish object to the right is Saturn. If you can't tell a planet from a star, ask yourself, "Does it twinkle?". Stars will twinkle while planets won't. Try it yourself. Turn around and face west on Monday night April 4th just after sunset and you'll see a one day old Moon below the Pleiades. Tuesday at the same time the Moon will be closer to the Pleiades. Then on Wednesday the Moon will be just below the Pleiades. I'm Dean Regas from the Cincinnati Observatory reminding you to Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


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