STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Thursday 4/20/06 - 1030-1130 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 06-18 / 1482nd Show
To Be Aired : Monday 5/01/2006 through
Sunday 5/07/2006

"Jupiter At Its Closest, Biggest And Brightest
This Week! Plus Don't Forget
National Astronomy Day This Saturday!"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and yes indeed the king of the planets Jupiter is at opposition this week which means it's at its closest, biggest and brightest for the entire year. And not only will it dazzle you with just the naked eye plus with even a cheap pair of binoculars you'll be able to see several of its largest moons and if you don't have a telescope science museums and astronomy clubs all across the U.S. will show you Jupiter for free through theirs this Saturday, which is National Astronomy Day. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for any night this week and next an hour after Sunset facing southeast where just above the horizon the brightest light you see will be the largest of the planets, 88,000 mile wide Jupiter which is really big. How big? Well our little planet Earth is only 8,000 miles wide, so we could line up 11 Earths side by side across Jupiter's middle. How's that for big? Now although opposition is an astronomical term, all it really means is that Jupiter is opposite the Sun in the sky as seen from Earth. And whenever a planet is at opposition it is at its closest and thus biggest and brightest for the entire year.

How close? Well this weekend Jupiter will be only 410 million miles away from Earth, which is almost 200 million miles closer than it was only a few months ago in October. So it's really close. So close that some people with acute vision may actually be able to see four of its largest moons with just the naked eye which will look like tiny pinpoints of light. And with a pair of binoculars you'll have no trouble seeing them at all. In fact this Saturday, Astronomy Day night, you'll see two on each side of Jupiter, Callisto and Io on one side, Europa and Ganymede on the other. And all but Europa are larger than our own 2,000 mile wide Moon. Wow! Through even the cheapest department store telescope, you'll see Jupiter's horizontal bands of weather plus you can actually watch the four largest moons change their position in relation to Jupiter night after night as they constantly orbit the planet king.

And now to see if you've got your thinking caps on, if Jupiter is opposite the Sun as seen from Earth right now, how many hours a night do you think you'll be able to see it? Well theoretically if you have a clear flat horizon all around you you'll see it all the hours the Sun is not in the sky. You see when a planet is at opposition it always rises in the east just as the Sun sets in the west. It then travels higher hour after hour until at midnight it reaches its highest point and then slowly descends toward the west hour after hour until at dawn it sets in the west just as the Sun rises in the east. So simple answer: you can see Jupiter all night long for the next couple of weeks. If you want to see it through a really nice telescope check out your nearest science institution or astronomy club because most of them will be offering free telescopic viewings of Jupiter this Saturday, Astronomy Day night. Go to our website for more info and celebrate the arrival of the king. Keep looking up!

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
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Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#06-18 M

5/01/2006 thru 5/07/2006

"Jupiter At Its Closest, Biggest And Brightest
This Week! Plus Don't Forget
National Astronomy Day This Saturday!"

Horkheimer: Jupiter is at its closest, biggest and brightest this week because it is at opposition and you can see it free through a telescope at science institutions all across the U.S. this Saturday National Astronomy Day night. An hour after sunset face east and you'll see 88,000 mile wide Jupiter which is so big we could line up 11 Earths across its middle. Opposition means that it is opposite the Sun in the sky as seen from Earth so it's visible all night long. It's 200 million miles closer than it was a few months ago. And with just a pair of binoculars you can watch its four largest moons, three of which are larger than our own Moon, shuttle back in orbit around the king. Go to our website for more info and keep looking up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Thursday 4/20/06 - 1030-1130 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode #06-19 /1483rd Show
To Be Aired : Monday 5/08/2006 through Sunday 5/14/2006

"The Horse On The Handle Of The Big Dipper"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Have you ever heard the story about the horse on the handle of the Big Dipper? Well it's a good one. O.K., we're facing due north any spring evening before midnight. And depending on the exact hour, and whether it's March, April, May or early June, the Big Dipper will be high up off the horizon either to the east of the north star or west of the North Star or directly above it. Four stars trace out its cup and three stars make up its handle.

But we're going to pay attention to what looks like to most people the one star at the bend of the handle, a star named Mizar. Now although you have undoubtedly seen this star many times, have you ever looked at it really close? Because if you do look at it really close you will see that it is not just one star but two. Indeed right next to Mizar you can see a slightly dimmer star, a star named Alcor, which in Arabic means "the lost or friendless one". Now centuries ago it was said that these two stars, bright Mizar and dimmer Alcor were used as a kind of ancient eye exam for a famous sultan's army. If a recruit could see both stars he was in, but if he couldn't he was out.

I kind of question the validity of that story, however because most people can see both stars. Although admittedly nowadays I have to use my glasses, so maybe the test was for older recruits. At any rate, long ago these two stars became popularly known as "the horse and the rider", bright Mizar being the horse and dimmer Alcor being the friendless rider. And you can see them for yourself any night you can see the Big Dipper.

And there our ancient eye test ends. But it doesn't end for modern eyes of a different kind, the eyes of telescopes and spectroscopes, because if we aim a spectroscope at Alcor the rider you would see that this so-called friendless one is not so friendless after all. In fact Alcor has a companion rider, another star invisible to the naked eye thus making Alcor two riders on Mizar the horse. But that's not exactly true either because if we look really close at Mizar we discover that Mizar is also not just one star, not even two stars or three stars or four stars but is in fact a rare quintuple star. Wow!

In other words when we look at this ancient Arab representation of a solitary horse with a solitary rider we are in reality looking at two horsemen driving a team of five horses across the night sky on the bend of the handle of the big dipper. Seven stars all told! Two double stars and one triple. Six of which are twice as big as our own million mile wide Sun and at least 50% brighter. Incredible isn't it? What modern astronomy reveals about objects that generations of mankind have seen for thousands of years. So get thee outside some spring night, and gallop across the heavens with the horse and his rider, Mizar and Alcor, two visible stars which are in reality seven! Keep looking up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#06-19 M

5/08/2006 thru 5/14/2006

 

"The Horse On The Handle Of The Big Dipper"

Horkheimer: Ancient Arabs used the Big Dipper for an eye test and you can too. Look north in early evening and if you look closely at Mizar the star at the bend of the handle you'll see a dimmer star Alcor right next to it. These two stars are known as the horse and the rider and the ability to see both got you into the sultan's army. But if you look closely through a telescope or spectroscope we see Alcor is actually two stars and Mizar is actually five stars. So in reality we have two horsemen driving a team of five horses across the night sky, seven stars where we see only two, two double stars and one triple, six of which are twice as big as our Sun and 50% brighter. Keep looking up!


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Thursday 4/20/06 - 1030-1130 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 06-20 / 1484th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 5/15/2006 through Sunday 5/21/2006

"The Moon Pays A Visit To The Brightest
And Dimmest Of The Naked Eye Planets!"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and mark two dates on your calendar for two special cosmic must-sees. #1 Sunday May 21st a beautiful last quarter Moon will visit the dimmest naked eye planet and three days later on Wednesday May 24th it will visit the brightest of the naked eye planets. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Sunday, May 21st an hour before Sunrise facing east where the two brightest things you'll see will be #1, Venus the brightest of all the planets and which is always so bright it is often mistaken for a UFO and # 2, an exquisite just past last quarter Moon will be up and to the right of Venus. And if you're really far away from all city lights and have clear cloudless skies, parked just above and to the left of the Moon, you'll see planet # 7, 32,000 mile wide Uranus, which is so huge we could line 16 Moons up across its middle. Now if you're viewing from an urban area where it never gets completely dark out then all you need to see the 7th planet is a pair of binoculars. It will look like a tiny blue green point of light and it is indeed the dimmest of all the naked eye planets. The reason being that it is so far away from the Sun, on average almost 2 billion miles away.

Uranus is a very peculiar planet because unlike all the other planets it circles the Sun tilted on its side so for 42 years its north pole gets sunlight and the other 42 years its south pole gets sunlight thus its nickname "the sideways planet". So don't miss the Moon and the dimmest naked eye planet on Sunday and then on Monday and Tuesday watch the Moon as it advances closer and closer to the brightest naked eye planet. On Monday the 22nd the Moon will be almost half way between Uranus and Venus and on Tuesday two thirds of the way. Plus if you pay close attention you will notice that the lighted portion of the Moon is getting smaller and smaller and turning into an exquisite slender crescent but the big day and the one day you can not miss for a super Moon Venus picture is ta da! Wednesday May 24th when a magnificent slender crescent almost as skinny as it gets will be parked only 4 and 1/2 degrees away from Venus, which will make a spectacular naked eye picture no binoculars needed.

To understand just how close 4 and 1/2 degrees is, simply remember that a full Moon is half a degree wide so 4 1/2 degrees is 9 full Moons wide which means we could fit only 9 full Moons between Venus and the Moon. Now although Venus is much smaller than Uranus, 8,000 miles wide the same size as our Earth, the reason it is so brilliant is because it is so incredibly close, only 85 million miles away the morning of the 24th. So once again on Sunday morning the 21st the Moon parks right next to Uranus for which you'll need your binoculars and on Wednesday the 24th the Moon makes an exquisite naked eye duo with the planet named for the goddess of love. Don't miss these two! It's easy, just keep looking up!


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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.

 


Star Gazer Minute

#06-20 M

5/15/2006 thru 5/21/2006

"The Moon Pays A Visit To The Brightest
And Dimmest Of The Naked Eye Planets!"

Horkheimer: You can use the Moon on May 21st to find the dimmest naked eye planet and on May 24th to find the brightest. Sunday before sunrise face east and up to the right of Venus you'll see the last quarter Moon. Just above it through a pair of binoculars you'll see 32,000 mile wide Uranus so huge we could line 16 Moons up across its middle. It will look like a blue green point of light. It's called the sideways planet because it circles the Sun tilted on its side. On Wednesday the Moon will be parked only 4 degrees away from the brightest planet, 8,000 mile wide Venus which is much smaller than Uranus but almost 18 times closer! Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Thursday 4/20/06 - 1030-1130 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 06-21 / 1485th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 5/22/2006 through Sunday 5/28/2006

"The Moon Visits Three Planets Starting This
Memorial Day Weekend"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Starting this Memorial Day weekend you can watch the Moon as it pays a visit to three sometimes hard to find planets. So you can use the Moon as a planet finder. O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Sunday night May 28th Memorial Day weekend just before it gets dark out facing northwest where you'll see an exquisite tiny sliver of a crescent Moon parked right above the first planet out from the sun tiny 3,000 mile wide Mercury. You'll have to have a clear, unobstructed, cloudless horizon to see it but it'll be bright and it'll be there although I always like to look for Mercury with binoculars. Look for it before it gets dark out because by the time it gets dark out Mercury will have set.

But the Moon will be exquisite because in addition to its bright slender crescent you'll see a black full Moon nestled inside it which is called earthshine which is really nothing more than sunlight bouncing off our Earth onto the Moon's darkened portion and back again. Interestingly if you use a pair of binoculars or a telescope, the earthshine part of the Moon is so dark you won't be able to see one single feature. So Sunday night the Moon and Mercury, then on Memorial Day night the Moon will be directly between Mercury and the next planet it's about to visit, a tiny reddish light which was super duper bright only a few months ago but which is now over 150 million miles farther away from us than when it was at its brightest on Halloween, 4,000 mile wide Mars.

And it will be hard to believe when you see it now that it was actually one of the brightest objects in the heavens last year. So if you have a hard time finding it all you have to do is wait 'til Tuesday night May 30th and an even bigger crescent Moon still complete with earthshine will make a dazzling duo as it parks right alongside Mars. And if that's not enough, the next night, the last night of May, Wednesday May 31st, an even fatter Moon will be parked directly above the wonderful ringed planet 75,000 mile wide Saturn whose ring system is actually two times the width of 88,000 mile wide Jupiter. Now if you have a small telescope neither Mercury nor Mars are going to show much detail but if you look at Saturn through even the cheapest telescope it will simply knock your socks off. Plus you'll be able to see its largest moon Titan, which is 1200 miles bigger than our own 2000 mile wide Moon. Wow! And for those of you who are extremely curious and want to know what those two very bright star like objects are just off to the right of Mars, well not only are they star like they actually are stars, Pollux and Castor the two brightest stars of Gemini.

So there you have it on Sunday night the Moon visits Mercury which will be 116 million miles away, on Monday it's between Mercury and Mars. And on Tuesday it's parked right next to Mars, which will be only 200 million miles away. Then on Wednesday, right above Saturn, which is 900 million miles away. Isn't star gazing amazing? Keep looking up!


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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#06-21 M

5/22/2006 thru 5/28/2006

"The Moon Visits Three Planets Starting This
Memorial Day Weekend"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Starting Memorial Day weekend you can use the Moon as a finder to find three sometimes hard to find planets. On Sunday just before dark face north west and an exquisite crescent Moon will be parked right next to 3,000 mile wide Mercury, on Memorial Day night it will be parked between Mercury and 4,000 mile wide Mars. And on Tuesday right next to Mars. Then on Wednesday ta da! It will be parked directly above the beautiful ringed planet 75,000 mile wide Saturn. Mercury will be 116 million miles away, Mars 200 million and Saturn a whopping 900 million. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer



STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Thursday 4/20/06 - 1030-1130 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 06-22 / 1486th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 5/29/2006 through Sunday 6/04/2006

"Watching Mars And Saturn Approach Each Other
For A Super Close Meeting On June 17th! Plus
Mercury Prepares For Its Own Summer Show!"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Over the next two and a half weeks from now until June 17th you'll be able to watch the red planet Mars and the ringed planet Saturn slowly approach each other in anticipation of a super close meeting on June 17th. And all the while the planet closest to the Sun, Mercury, will like wise become more prominent each night in preparation for its best summer showing on June 20th. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Thursday the first day of June at dusk before it's completely dark out facing west. And if you have a clear flat horizon you'll see planet #1, 3,000 mile wide Mercury, extremely close to the horizon. Then if you draw an imaginary line from Mercury up to its left it will pass through two planets, planet #4, 4,000 mile wide Mars and planet #6, 75,000 mile wide Saturn. And if you have a pair of binoculars and wait until it's completely dark out you'll notice that just above Saturn is the famous cluster of stars called The Beehive because that's what it looks like. And you'll be able to watch Saturn and Mars change their positions in relation to it night after night.

Now on Thursday the 1st Mars and Saturn are only 8 degrees apart. Which is easier to understand if we put it in terms of full Moon widths because a full Moon is only 1/2 a degree wide which means this Thursday we could line up 16 full Moons end to end between Mars and Saturn. Now although Mars and Saturn will move a little bit closer every single night we're going to skip to Sunday June 4th when they'll be only 6 and 3/4 degrees apart or roughly 12 and 1/2 full Moons. And then on Thursday June 8th a little less than 5 degrees or 10 full Moons apart, on Sunday June 11th a dramatic change, little more than 3 degrees or 6 full Moons apart. But by the following Thursday the 13th they'll be slightly more than 1 degree or 2 full Moons apart and Friday about 1 and 1/2 full Moons apart. But then if you go out the next night they will be at their absolute closest barely more than half a degree apart which means that less than one full Moon could fit between them. Wow!

And if you've been paying close attention you'll have noticed that Mercury has been rising steadily higher night after night getting ready for its highest point on the 20th. But for some real fun if you've got binoculars take a look on Tuesday the 13th at The Beehive and you'll notice that Mars and Saturn are on either side of it. On Wednesday the 14th Mars will be approaching it. But ta da! On Thursday the 15th Mars will be smack dab in front of it or embedded in it as we say. On Friday the 16th it will have drifted just past The Beehive and on Saturday when Mars and Saturn are at their absolute closest The Beehive stands by itself once again. So start your Mercury, Mars, Beehive watch now. What a difference from June 1st to June 17th! Keep looking up!


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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#06-22 M

5/29/2006 thru 6/04/2006

"Watching Mars And Saturn Approach Each Other
For A Super Close Meeting On June 17th! Plus
Mercury Prepares For Its Own Summer Show!"

Horkheimer: From now until June 17th you'll be able to watch Mars and Saturn slowly approach each other in preparation for a super close meeting on the 17th. On June 1st at dusk face west and you'll see Mercury, Mars and Saturn. Mars and Saturn will be only 8 degrees or 16 full Moon widths apart but night after night the distance between them will drastically shorten and Mercury will climb steadily higher. The night of nights will be Saturday the 17th when Mars and Saturn will be their absolute closest little more than half a degree apart which means that less than one full Moon could fit between them. Wow! Start your Mars / Saturn watch now! Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


[SmilinJack]Return to the [STAR GAZER Main Page]