STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half hour feed
Friday 4/20/07 1000 to 1030
Includes episodes 0719, 0720, 0721, 0722


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

 

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 07-19 / 1535th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 5/07/2007 through
Sunday 5/13/2007

"The Moon Visits The Two Planets
Closest To The Sun"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Because of a certain sit-com, "Third Rock From The Sun", almost everyone knows that planet Earth is planet number three from the sun. But do you remember which planets are number one and two? I'll give you a hint. Planet number one is only a thousand miles bigger than our own Moon and planet number two is almost the same size as our planet Earth. And next week you can use the Moon to find both of them. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for next week Thursday May 17th during dusk while there's still some twilight out facing west and if you've got a really clear, flat, unobstructed horizon you will see an exquisite crescent Moon parked right above a bright pinkish light which is planet number one, 3,000 mile wide Mercury. Named for the swift Roman messenger of the gods, which is an interesting coincidence because Mercury is the fastest moving of all the planets. In fact, while it takes our Earth 365 1/4 Earth days to make one trip around the Sun, Mercury makes one trip around the Sun in only 88 Earth days, which means that if you're thirty Earth years old you'd be 124 Mercury years old.

Now if we draw a straight line up and to the left of Mercury it will connect with an extremely brilliant, dazzling white light which is planet number two, 8,000 mile wide Venus which is almost the same size as our Earth. And since it is the second fastest moving planet, if you are 30 Earth years old, you'd be almost 49 Venus years old but that's still better than being 124 on Mercury. Now Venus is the brightest of all the planets and is the one always depicted in history, even on flags, all the way back to the time of early cave paintings, whenever there's a Moon close by. And that's what we're going to see Saturday the 19th because the Moon will be so close to Venus it will take your breath away. So on Thursday look for Mercury and the Moon. Then on Friday you'll see the Moon almost exactly half way between Mercury and Venus.

But the best night, the night you must mark on your calendar will be Saturday night the 19th when an even bigger crescent Moon complete with gorgeous Earthshine, which will look like a mysterious dark full Moon nestled within the crescent, will be parked only one degree away from Venus, which is about the width of two full Moons, but which astronomically speaking is super, super close! And believe me no matter where you happen to be on Saturday evening you'll be able to see these two paired together for almost three hours as the two of them slowly drift down toward the horizon. Don't miss this please! Mercury and the Moon on Thursday, the Moon between Mercury and Venus on Friday and an almost beyond belief pairing of the Moon and Venus on Saturday! It doesn't get much better than this. Keep looking up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


 

Star Gazer Minute

#07-19 M

5/07/2007 thru 5/13/2007

"The Moon Visits The Two Planets
Closest To The Sun"

Horkheimer: Next week you can use the Moon to find the two planets closest to the Sun. Next Thursday at dusk face west and you'll see an exquisite crescent Moon parked right above a bright pink light, planet #1, 3,000 mile wide Mercury. Mercury is the fastest moving planet and its year is only 88 Earth days long. So if you're 30 years old on Earth you'd be 124 years old on Mercury. Above it is planet #2, 8,000 mile wide Venus, the second fastest moving planet. So if you're 30 years old on Earth you'd be 49 years old on Venus. On Saturday the 19th the Moon will be so close to Venus it will take your breath away. Don't miss this please! It's spectacular! Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half hour feed
Friday 4/20/07 1000 to 1030
Includes episodes 0719, 0720, 0721, 0722
Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.




STAR GAZER

Episode #07-20 /1536th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 5/14/2007 through Sunday 5/20/2007

"A Venus Moon Spectacular This Saturday And
The Moon Visits Saturn And Regulus On Tuesday"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Mark two dates on your calendar, this Saturday May 19th just after sunset as the night when the Moon and the most brilliant planet of all will make one of the most exquisite sky pictures you'll ever see. And also mark Tuesday night, May 22nd as the night you'll be able to use the Moon to find both the ringed planet Saturn and the brightest star of Leo the Lion. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Saturday night May 19th just after it gets dark out facing west where if its not cloudy you will see an absolutely exquisite pairing of our 2,000 mile wide Moon in exquisite crescent form with 8,000 mile wide Venus which is right now shining extremely bright. And you'll notice immediately without any prompting that this is the kind of sky pairing that is so dramatic that it takes most people's breath away and has done so for thousands of years for as long as men, women and children have looked up at the heavens. So don't miss this please. And look also for what appears to be a dark full Moon nestled within the bright crescent. This is called earthshine because unlike the bright crescent which is lit by direct sunlight from the sun the greyish black, dim, almost full Moon is sunlight bouncing off our Earth onto the unlighted portion of the Moon and back to Earth again, thus the name earthshine, which is also poetically called "the Old Moon in the New Moon's arms."

Now while this is an absolute knockout to the naked eye, if you have a pair of binoculars you'll be totally blown away. And if you have a small telescope you'll notice that Venus looks like a tiny last quarter Moon, wow! 24 hours later on Sunday the 20th it will be much higher and on a straight line with the two brightest stars of Gemini, Pollux and Castor. And on Monday the 21st it's heading for its next stop and is getting ready to close in on the ringed planet. Indeed, on Tuesday the 22nd an absolutely exquisite Moon will be parked just to the left of and so close to Saturn you'll be able to use it as a Saturn finder. And once again, if you have a telescope, take a look at Saturn now because it's truly wonderful.

Plus if you look just to the left of the Moon you'll see one of springtime's brightest stars the hot blue white star Regulus which marks the heart of Leo the Lion. Once again this Saturday an exquisite Moon complete with earthshine is parked right next to Venus, and on Sunday is parked on a straight line with Gemini's Pollux and Castor. On Monday it's zeroing in on Saturn and on Tuesday you can use the Moon to find both Saturn and the heart of the cosmic lion king. But if I had to pick only one night, I'd pick Saturday the 19th because Venus and the Moon will be truly awesome. I guarantee it. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#07-20 M

5/14/2007 thru 5/20/2007

"A Venus Moon Spectacular This Saturday And
The Moon Visits Saturn And Regulus On Tuesday"

Horkheimer: This Saturday the Moon and Venus will make one of the most exquisite pairings you'll ever see. And next Tuesday you'll be able to use the Moon to find both Saturn and Regulus. This Saturday just after sunset look west and Venus and the Moon will be so close you'll stand in awe just as hundreds of generations have every time this happens. On Tuesday the 22nd the Moon will be parked between the ringed planet Saturn and the hot blue-white star, which marks the heart of Leo the Lion, Regulus. But if you have to choose between the two dates go for Saturday the 19th because whenever Venus and the Moon are this close it's a sight you will never forget! Keep looking up!


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half hour feed
Friday 4/20/07 1000 to 1030
Includes episodes 0719, 0720, 0721, 0722

Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 07-21 / 1537th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 5/21/2007 through Sunday 5/27/2007

"A Super Five Planet Parade For Memorial Day Weekend"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. You know every time we celebrate a long holiday weekend I always try to find things of interest in the night sky that will make your weekend more enjoyable especially if you want to spend some time outside in early evening after sunset or early morning just before sunrise. And this Memorial Day weekend the cosmos is being very good to us because not one, not two, not three, not four but five naked eye planets are placed just right for your viewing pleasure. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this weekend Saturday the 26th, Sunday the 27th and Memorial Day Monday the 28th, one hour after sunset facing west where you'll see three bright lights which appear to lie along a straight line which astronomers call the ecliptic, which is the invisible path in the sky along which all the planets travel. The brightest light in the middle is super dazzling planet #2, 8,000 mile wide, Earth-sized Venus. And just below it close to the horizon is the pink iron planet, planet #1, 3,000 mile wide Mercury which looks pink because it never gets very high above the horizon so we always see it through the dusty layers of our Earth's atmosphere which give it this false coloration. It's called the iron planet because it has more iron in its core than our Earth has.

Now just above Venus on the ecliptic you'll see planet #6, 75,000 mile wide ringed Saturn, which is just begging you to take a look at it through a small telescope before it disappears from evening skies in mid July. So once again, close to the horizon we have planet #1, Mercury, above it planet #2, dazzling Venus and above it not quite so bright planet #6, super Saturn. Now if you extend our imaginary line, the ecliptic, you will find yet two more naked eye planets along it. But you'll have to wait until about 11 o'clock until the next planet has risen and you'll have to look southeast. So all this weekend if you go out around 11 p.m. and look southeast you'll see the second brightest planet, planet #5, the king of them all, 88,000 mile wide Jupiter which is also fabulous for viewing through a small telescope.

Now if you extend our line even further and wait until about one hour before sunrise still looking south east the brightest object you'll see will be planet #4, rouge-gold 4,000 mile wide Mars which is getting steadily brighter every month as it races towards us for a close encounter this December. So to repeat, in reverse order, if you go out any morning this Memorial Day weekend about one hour before sunrise and look southeast you'll see Mars. If you go out around 11 p.m. you'll see giant Jupiter and if you look west about one hour after sunset; Saturn, Venus and Mercury. Is this going to be a fabulous Memorial Day weekend or what? Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.

 


 

Star Gazer Minute

#07-21 M

5/21/2007 thru 5/27/2007

"A Super Five Planet Parade For Memorial Day Weekend"

Horkheimer: This Memorial Day weekend five naked eye planets are available for your viewing pleasure. This weekend one hour after sunset face west and you'll see three planets lined up in a row. Planet #2, 8,000 mile wide Venus, planet #1, 3,000 mile wide Mercury, planet #6, 75,000 mile wide Saturn. Extend that line and at 11 p.m. Look southeast and you'll see planet #5, 88,000 mile wide Jupiter. Extend that line even further and one hour before sunrise you'll see planet #4, rouge-gold 4,000 mile wide Mars. Mars before sunrise, Jupiter at 10 p.m. And Saturn, Venus and Mercury just after sunset. Is this going to be a fabulous Memorial Day weekend or what? Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half hour feed
Friday 4/20/07 1000 to 1030
Includes episodes 0719, 0720, 0721, 0722

Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 07-22 / 1538th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 5/28/2007 through Sunday 6/03/2007

"A Tale Of Two Planets And Two Stars"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. On June 2nd the first planet from the Sun Mercury will be at what astronomers call greatest elongation from the Sun. And seven days later on the 9th the second planet from the Sun Venus will also be at greatest elongation from the Sun. On top of which the two brightest stars of Gemini will be perched right along side lovely Venus. What does this all mean? Let me explain.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this weekend Saturday June 2nd and Sunday June 3rd at dusk while there's still some light our facing west where the brightest thing you'll see will be the brightest planet of them all dazzling 8,000 mile wide Venus. And down below it to its right a much dimmer although still bright pinkish light 3,000 mile wide planet Mercury. Now if you look at both these planets through a small telescope you will notice that they both look like different phases of tiny Moons. Indeed Mercury will look like a tiny slender crescent Moon whereas Venus will look like a first quarter Moon. And while they both share the distinction of being the only two planets closer to the Sun than Earth, they also just coincidentally this June are at similar places in their respective orbits as seen from Earth.

In fact if we could see them from outer space their positions in relation to the Sun and Earth would be remarkably similar because they will both be at greatest elongation from the Sun, Mercury on the 2nd and Venus on the 9th. Now greatest elongation sounds complicated but it simply means that both planets will be at their farthest visual distance from the Sun on those dates as seen from Earth, which usually makes them appear much higher above the horizon and thus visible for viewing longer after Sunset. Even so Mercury never gets very high above the horizon even when it's at greatest elongation so make sure you start looking for it while there is still some light out and have a clear flat unobstructed horizon.

And as a bonus, right now these two planets share the early evening sky with two wonderful stars, the two brightest stars of Gemini the twins, Pollux and Castor. And ta da! A recent discovery about Pollux blows Venus and Mercury away planetwise because it is now known that Pollux, which is almost 10 times as wide as our million mile wide Sun, has at least one planet moving around it, but that that planet is unlike any planet in our solar system. Indeed, while our king of the planets Jupiter is 88,000 miles wide, Pollux's planet is 3 times as massive as Jupiter. Wow! Plus Pollux enjoys the distinction of being the brightest star we can see that we now know has a planet in orbit about it. So get thee out this weekend and look for Venus, Pollux and Castor lined up in a row and tiny pinkish Mercury huddled near the horizon. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


 

Star Gazer Minute

#07-22 M

5/28/2007 thru 6/03/2007

"A Tale Of Two Planets And Two Stars"

Horkheimer: The two planets closest to the sun will be at greatest elongation on the 2nd and 9th plus the Gemini twins share the sky with them. This weekend after sunset look west and you'll see 8,000 mile wide Venus and 3,000 mile wide Mercury. Both of which are at greatest elongation which means they are at their farthest distances from the Sun as seen from Earth. Next to Venus are the two brightest stars of Gemini, Pollux and Castor. And recently it was discovered that Pollux is the brightest star known to have a planet. But it blows all our planets away because it's three times as massive as our biggest planet Jupiter. Wow! Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


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