STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

OneHour Feed STAH 911
Tuesday April 20, 2010, 1100-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 1018, 1019, 1020, 1021, 1022


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 10-18 / 1691st Show
To Be Aired : Monday 5/3/2010 through
Sunday 5/9/2010

"The Moon Pays A Visit To The Two Brightest Planets And Start Your Mars Race To Regulus Watch Now"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. On May 9th and 10th the Moon pays a visit to the second brightest planet Jupiter and on the 15th and 16th pays a visit to the brightest planet Venus. Plus you can watch Mars race toward Leo the Lion's brightest star all month long. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Sunday morning May 9th an hour before sunrise facing east where your breath will be taken away by an exquisite pairing of a 25 day old waning crescent Moon and the largest planet, 88,000 mile wide Jupiter. And believe me you'll be most impressed by this pairing. But if you miss it, the following morning Monday May 10th, an even skinnier crescent Moon will be parked just off to the left of Jupiter in a not quite as close but still exquisite pairing. Don't miss either of these pairings please: Sunday May 9th and Monday May 10th.

And if you like this pairing of the second brightest planet and the Moon you'll be even more dazzled methinks by the pairing of the brightest planet and the Moon on the following weekend of the 15th and 16th. Indeed simply look west northwest about 45 minutes after sunset Saturday the 15th and a tiny slender sliver of a waxing crescent Moon complete with Earthshine, which will look like a blackish-grey full Moon nestled within it, will be parked just down and to the right of dazzling bewitching Earth-sized, 8,000 mile wide Venus, which is the kind of pairing depicted in art throughout human history. But if you miss it on Saturday don't fret because on Sunday the 16th a slightly fatter crescent Moon will be on the other side of Venus up and to its left, two wonderful pairings, Saturday the 15th and Sunday the 16th.

But there's more because if you look about half way up the western sky you'll see a rouge-gold object which is tiny, 4,000 mile wide Mars. It is just down and to the right of the sickle shaped pattern of stars which makes up the front of Leo the Lion, with Leo's brightest star Regulus marking Leo's heart. Now on the 15th and 16th Mars will be about 10 and 1/2 degrees away from Regulus. And since a full Moon is 1/2 a degree, that means we could fit 21 full Moons between them. But now here is where the fun comes in. Because if you go out and look up at Mars and Regulus night after night all throughout May you'll be able to watch Mars move closer and closer towards Regulus. By Memorial Day it will be only 3 and 1/4 degrees away from Regulus which means that only 6 1/2 full Moons would fit between them.

But the best is yet to come because ta da! On June 5th and 6th Mars and Regulus will have a super close meeting and will be less than one degree apart which means that we could barely fit one full Moon between them which is super close astronomically speaking. Wow! So start your Mars race to Regulus watch now. And don't miss the great Moon and planet pairings on the 9th and 10th and the 15th and 16th! Keep looking up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#10-18 M

5/3/2010 thru 5/9/2010

"The Moon Pays A Visit To The Two Brightest Planets And Start Your Mars Race To Regulus Watch Now"

Horkheimer: Watch the Moon visit the two brightest planets and start your Mars race to Regulus now! Sunday May 9th just before sunrise face east and you'll see an exquisite pairing of a waning crescent Moon and the second brightest planet Jupiter followed by a second pairing 24 hours later on Monday. On Saturday the 15th just after sunset look west northwest and a slender waxing crescent Moon will pair up with the brightest planet Venus followed by another pairing 24 hours later on Sunday. Plus look half way up the sky and you'll see Mars only 21 full Moons away from Regulus the brightest star of Leo. Watch it every night because on June 5th and 6th they'll meet and be less than one full Moon apart! Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

OneHour Feed STAH 911
Tuesday April 20, 2010, 1100-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 1018, 1019, 1020, 1021, 1022


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode #10-19 /1692nd Show
To Be Aired : Monday 5/10/2010 through Sunday 5/16/2010

"Test Your Eyesight The Cosmic Way.
Can You See The Horse And Its Rider?"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. According to popular folklore some of our ancestors tested their eyes the cosmic way and you can perform that very same eye test yourself any clear night you can see the Big Dipper. Let me show you.

O.K., we're facing due north any spring evening before midnight. And depending on the exact hour, and whether it's March, April, May or June, the Big Dipper will be high up off the horizon either to the east of the North Star or west of the North Star or directly above it. Four stars trace out its cup and three stars make up its handle. But we're going to pay attention to what looks like to most people the one star at the bend of the handle, a star named Mizar.

Now although you have undoubtedly seen this star many times, have you ever looked at it really close? Because if you do look at it really close you will see that it is not just one star but two. Indeed right next to Mizar you can see a slightly dimmer star, a star named Alcor, which in Arabic means "the lost or friendless one". And many centuries ago it was said that these two stars, bright Mizar and dimmer Alcor were used as a kind of ancient eye exam for a famous sultan's army. If a recruit could see both stars he was in, but if he couldn't he was out. I kind of question the validity of that story however, because most people can see both stars, although admittedly nowadays I have to use my glasses. So maybe the test was for older recruits.

At any rate, these two stars became popularly known as "the horse and the rider", bright Mizar being the horse and dimmer Alcor being the lost friendless rider. And you can see them for yourself any night you can see the Big Dipper. And there our ancient human eye test ends. But it doesn't end for modern eye tests for eyes of a different kind, the eyes of telescopes and spectroscopes, because if we aim a spectroscope at Alcor the rider, we see that this so-called lost friendless one is not so friendless after all. In fact Alcor has a companion rider, another star invisible to the naked eye thus making Alcor two riders on Mizar the horse.

But even that's not the whole story because if we look really close at Mizar the horse we discover that it is also not just one star, or two stars or three stars or four stars but is in fact a rare quintuple star. Wow! In other words when we look at this ancient Arab representation of a solitary horse with a solitary rider we are in reality looking at two horsemen not riding but driving a team of five horses across the night sky on the bend of the handle of the Big Dipper. Seven stars all told! Two double stars and one triple star, six of which are twice as big as our own million mile wide Sun and at least 50% brighter.

Incredible, isn't it! What modern astronomy reveals about stars that generation after generation have seen for thousands of years. So get thee outside some spring night, and gallop across the heavens with Mizar and Alcor the horse and his rider, two visible stars which are in reality seven! A two driver chariot pulled by five celestial steeds. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#10-19 M

5/10/2010 thru 5/16/2010

"Test Your Eyesight The Cosmic Way.
Can You See The Horse And Its Rider?"

Horkheimer: Ancient Arabs used the Big Dipper for an eye test and you can too. Look north in early evening and if you look closely at Mizar, the star at the bend of the handle, you'll see a dimmer star, Alcor right next to it. These two stars are known as the horse and the rider and the ability to see both got you into the sultan's army. But if we look closely through a telescope or spectroscope we see Alcor is actually two stars and Mizar is actually five stars. So in reality we have two horsemen driving a team of five horses across the night sky, seven stars where we see only two. Two double stars and one triple star, six of which are as big as our Sun and 50% brighter! Keep looking up!


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

OneHour Feed STAH 911
Tuesday April 20, 2010, 1100-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 1018, 1019, 1020, 1021, 1022


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode # 10-20 / 1693rd Show

To Be Aired : Monday 5/17/2010 through Sunday 5/23/2010

"See The Lord Of The Rings Almost Ringless
Then Watch His Rings Grow"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. This is a wonderful time to take a look at Saturn the lord of the rings planet because you'll not see the rings this skinny again until the year 2025. Plus you'll be able to watch them grow from now until October 2017 when they will be at their fattest. Let me explain.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for any night the next couple of weeks just after Sunset facing south where you will see two bright lights. The slightly bluish one is Spica the brightest star of Virgo the Virgin. And to its right is pale yellowish white ringed Saturn. It is the second largest planet because it is only 75,000 miles wide compared to Jupiter's 88,000 mile width. But if we cheat and count Saturn's rings it's actually twice as wide as Jupiter, 176 thousand miles wide. It enjoys another peculiar distinction because its density is actually less than that of water, which means that if we could find a cosmic bathtub big enough, it would float. And don't make me say it; it would undoubtedly leave rings around the tub. At any rate once you've found Saturn I suggest you take a look at it through an O.P.T. which is short for Other People's Telescopes, or if you do happen to have a small telescope yourself you can watch Saturn's rings slowly grow for the next several years.

Right now Saturn's rings are the skinniest you will see them until March of 2025. But in the meantime you can watch them grow until they are at their widest in 2017. They're about 2 degrees open right now as astronomers say. But they will slowly keep opening, so much so that by the end of this year, they'll be 10 degrees open. And this opening process will continue and is really fun to watch. But why do Saturn's rings open and close you ask?

Well it all has to do with the positions and orbits of Earth and Saturn. Now our Earth is the third planet out from the Sun and Saturn is #6. According to Kepler's third law of planetary motion, the closer a planet is to the Sun the faster it travels. Our Earth makes one trip around the Sun, that is one orbit, once every 365 1/4 days. Saturn however is so much farther away and moves so much slower that it takes it 29 1/2Earth years to make one trip around the Sun.

Last September it was positioned so that we saw Saturn's rings edge on. And it takes approximately 7 1/2 years from that time until we'll see Saturn's rings wide open, which will occur in 2017. Then after 7 1/2 more years Earth will be in such a position that we will see Saturn's rings edge on again. After which they will start to open in the other direction for the next 7 1/2 years and will be wide open once again in 2033. Then 7 1/2 years later we'll see them edge on once again almost exactly the way we saw them last September. The entire cycle takes about 29 1/2 years.

But remember that Saturn is not actually rocking back and forth. It simply has to do with where we each are in our respective orbits. So get thee outside just after sunset, face south and look for Saturn's rings, which are currently very skinny. Start your ring opening watch now! And keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#10-20 M

5/17/2010 thru 5/23/2010

"See The Lord Of The Rings Almost Ringless
Then Watch His Rings Grow"

Horkheimer: Right now Saturn's rings are as skinny as you'll see them until 2025. Just after sunset face south and you'll see bright yellowish Saturn. Through a small telescope, Saturn's rings look super skinny. But you can watch them slowly grow and open until they reach their widest in 2017. Then they'll slowly close and be super skinny once again in 2025. The reason Saturn's rings seem to close and open is because Earth and Saturn constantly change their relationship to each other in the 29 1/2 years it takes Saturn to make one trip around the Sun. It takes 7 1/2 years for us to see Saturn's rings go from skinny to wide open and another 7 1/2 to see them go from wide open to skinny. It's a real cosmic ballet. So watch Saturn's rings grow. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

OneHour Feed STAH 911
Tuesday April 20, 2010, 1100-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 1018, 1019, 1020, 1021, 1022


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode # 10-21 / 1694th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 5/24/2010 through Sunday 5/30/2010

"Awesome Arcturus : The Now You See It,
Now You Don't, Star"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Do you know that when we look up at the stars at night we see the same star patterns which our ancestors saw thousands of years ago, and which our descendants will see thousands of years from now? Indeed, the star patterns we see every night appear to be never-changing and fixed in their positions relative to each other. But in reality they're not. In fact all of the stars we see are moving at incredible speeds throughout space in every conceivable direction. But because they are all so incredibly far away it takes many generations to notice even small changes in their positions relative to one another, except however for a couple of them. And it was Edmond Halley for whom Halley's comet is named who discovered this, when almost 300 years ago he discovered that the bright star Arcturus had changed its position from its location in ancient star charts which made him wonder if perhaps the stars were not as permanently fixed as everyone thought. Of course, he was right, because we now know that all the stars are moving and that Arcturus just happens to change its position among the stars faster than any bright star except Alpha Centauri. And that's just one of the extraordinary things about Arcturus. But before I tell you more, let me show you how to find it.

Go outside any clear evening in spring, look north for the Big Dipper, then use it as a guide, because to find Arcturus all you have to do is shoot an arrow through the handle of the Big Dipper and that arrow will land on Arcturus, the brightest star in the constellation Bootes, the herdsman. And once you've found it think of this: while all the other stars are moving in different directions at different speeds, Arcturus' direction and speed are very special. You see Arcturus is moving almost 90 miles per second toward the constellation Virgo which causes it to change its position among the stars one full Moon width every nine hundred years. That's fast!

So Bootes is the one constellation that's changing its shape faster than all the rest, so fast I like to think of Arcturus as the star of a million years because it was only one-half a million years ago that Arcturus first became visible. And although it's very bright right now, in only one- half million years more it will no longer be visible to the naked eye. In fact, although ancient records listed Arcturus as the 6th brightest star in the heavens, it has moved so much closer in the past 2 thousand years, that it is now the 4th brightest.

Indeed, we who walk this planet now are seeing Arcturus as bright as any humans will ever see it because right now Arcturus is as close as it will ever come to our planet Earth. In fact it will soon, cosmically speaking, pass us by and speed away into the void forever. Think of it, Arcturus, one of the brightest stars of our time, invisible to our ancestors only half a million years ago will be invisible once again half a million years from now! Find Arcturus now while it's still there! Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#10-21 M

5/24/2010 thru 5/30/2010

"Awesome Arcturus : The Now You See It,
Now You Don't, Star"

Horkheimer: you know many people believe that the stars are fixed in position relative to one another but they're not. Take Arcturus for instance which you can find by shooting an imaginary arrow through the handle of the Big Dipper. Arcturus is moving so fast, 90 miles per second, that it actually changes its position by one full Moon width every 900 years in the direction of Virgo. In fact although ancient records listed Arcturus as the 6th brightest star it has since moved so close to us that it is now the 4th brightest. But not for long because it will soon start to move away from us and in a mere half a million years will disappear from sight all together. Right now it is as close and as bright as it gets. So catch it while you can before it slips away. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

OneHour Feed STAH 911
Tuesday April 20, 2010, 1100-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 1018, 1019, 1020, 1021, 1022


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
Lorain County JVS-CORE
15181 Route 58 South
Oberlin, OH 44074

Phone: (440) 775-1400
Fax: (440) 775-1460
E-mail: NASA_order@lcjvs.net
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode # 10-22 / 1695th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 5/31/2010 through Sunday 6/6/2010

"An Impressive Meeting Of Planets And Stars
During The First Two weeks Of June"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings, fellow star gazers. Let me tell you that June night skies will be opening like a lovely cosmic flower with several meetings and lineups between planets and stars. Let me show you!

O.K., we've got our skies set up for Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday evenings June 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th just after it gets dark facing west where you will see three stars which if joined by lines would look like a triangle and several stars which if we draw lines between them would look like a backward question mark or a sickle. Together these two patterns make up the front and rear of Leo the Lion. Leo's brightest star is called Regulus. But if we take the connecting lines in Leo away you will notice that there is one extra star-like object almost next to Regulus which isn't supposed to be there. And that my friends is 4,000 mile wide, half the size of planet Earth, planet #4, rouge gold Mars. And from Saturday through Tuesday Mars and Regulus will be super close, only one degree apart, which is really close cosmically speaking. So catch them now because after Tuesday Mars will speed away from Regulus at a fairly rapid rate.

Next if you also go out this Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday an hour before sunrise and look southeast the brightest light you'll see will be the king of the planets, planet #5, 88,000 mile wide Jupiter, so huge we could line up 11 Earths across its middle. But if you use a pair of binoculars and look just above Jupiter you'll see a faint blue-green dot which is the 7th planet, 32,000 mile wide Uranus, which is one and a half billion miles farther away than Jupiter. And on the 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th, Uranus will be only one half a degree away from Jupiter - twice as close as Mars is to Regulus on those same days. So please don't miss this rare opportunity to use Jupiter to find Uranus.

Finally on Friday evening June 11th, which is my birthday, about an hour after sunset face west northwest and you'll see brilliant planet #2, 8,000 mile wide, Earth-sized Venus lined up in an absolute straight line with the two brightest stars of Gemini, Pollux and Castor. Nifty!

So there you have it, on Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday the 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th just after dark look west and the red planet Mars will be having a super close meeting with Leo's brightest star Regulus. And also on June 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th an hour before sunrise look southeast and you'll see dazzling Jupiter and, through a pair of binoculars, just above it less than one half degree away, planet #7 Uranus, which is never easy to find unless you have another planet close by as a finder, like Jupiter. Then on June 11th an hour after sunset look west northwest and Venus and the Gemini twins will be performing a celestial chorus line. What a great way to begin June. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#10-22 M

5/31/2010 thru 6/6/2010

"An Impressive Meeting Of Planets And Stars
During The First Two weeks Of June"

Horkheimer: The first two weeks of June are fabulous for meetings and lineups between planets and stars. On June 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th just after dark face west and you'll see Leo's brightest star Regulus and less than one degree away from it you'll see rouge-gold planet #4 Mars, an exquisite pairing of a planet and star. On the same days before sunrise look southeast and you'll see brilliant planet #5 Jupiter and just above it less than one half a degree away a faint blue-green dot which is the 7th planet Uranus and which is almost impossible to find unless you have a bright planet close by as a finder. Use a pair of binoculars please. What a way to begin June! A pair of pairings! Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer

 

 


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