STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One Hour Feed STAH 905
Tuesday October 20, 2009, 1100-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 0944, 0945, 0946, 0947, 0948


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)
NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators
Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 /
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core
nasa_order@lcjvs.net

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 09-44 / 1665th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 11/02/2009 through
Sunday 11/08/2009

"The Lost Rings Of Saturn Return And
An Aging Moon Visits Two Planets And
Virgo's Brightest Star"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Next week an aging waning crescent Moon will slowly shrink and as it does so will pay a visit to the prettiest ringed planet whose lost rings are now returning, plus the brightest star of the constellation Virgo, and the brightest planet of them all, which will soon disappear from easy view. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for Thursday morning November 12th which some say is the beginning of Indian Summer about 30 minutes before sunrise facing southeast where you will see an exquisite 25 day old crescent Moon. And just off to its left the planet whose lost rings have now returned, our old friend Saturn. Now the reason I say its lost rings have now returned is because twice in Saturn's 30 year orbit about the Sun, about every 15 years, our Earth and Saturn line up in such a way that we see its rings from an edge on position at which time they completely disappear from view through most telescopes for a few nights. But then as both planets keep moving and changing their distance and aspect to one another we start seeing more and more of one or the other side of Saturn's rings.

Now the rings completely disappeared in September. Before September we were looking at the bottom or southern side of Saturn's rings for several years. But now we are just starting a several year ever-expanding view of looking at the top side or northern side of Saturn's rings. And we will see more and more of them as time goes by. Now without Saturn's rings, Saturn is only 75,000 miles wide. Add its rings and it's actually twice as wide as Jupiter from one edge to the other, 176,000 miles wide. But they are only 30 feet thick. That's why they can disappear from view when we see them edge on. Wow!

Now on Friday morning November 13th a slightly skinnier Moon will be well past Saturn and on its way to the brightest star in Virgo the virgin, Spica, which may be hard to see in twilight. But if you wait for 24 hours more you can use the Moon to find it because on Saturday the 14th an even skinnier Moon will be almost beside it. Finally on Sunday morning the 15th one of the skinniest Moons you'll ever see, if you have a clear flat horizon, will be just to the side of, also horizon hugging , brightest planet of them all, Venus, which will soon disappear from sight.

Venus is of course much smaller than Saturn, only 8,000 miles wide, the same size as our Earth. But compared to Spica, Venus and Saturn are puny. In fact Spica is 8 times wider than our own million mile wide Sun. And is a much hotter star burning with a fierceness 23, 000 times our Sun's light intensity. So there you have it. A chance to use an aging waning crescent Moon to find two planets and a wonderful star. Thursday the 12th, the Moon visits Saturn, on Friday the 13th between Saturn and Spica, Saturday the 14th almost next to Spica, and on Sunday the 15th hugging the horizon with dazzling Venus. Keep looking up!

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"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
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Star Gazer Minute

#09-44 M

11/02/2009 thru 11/08/2009

"The Lost Rings Of Saturn Return And
An Aging Moon Visits Two Planets And
Virgo's Brightest Star"

Horkheimer: Next week an aging crescent Moon will visit two planets and Virgo's brightest star. Thursday November 12th 30 minutes before sunrise face southeast and an exquisite crescent Moon will be just off to the side of Saturn the planet which lost its rings because they were invisible when they were edge on in September but which are now beginning to return. On Saturday the 14th the Moon will be right next to Spica the brightest star of Virgo. And on Sunday the 15th one of the skinniest Moons you'll ever see, will hug the horizon with Venus. Venus is 8,000 miles wide, Saturn is 75,000 miles wide, but Spica is a whopping 8 million miles wide! Use the Moon to find them, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One Hour Feed STAH 905
Tuesday October 20, 2009, 1100-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 0944, 0945, 0946, 0947, 0948


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)
NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators
Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 /
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core
nasa_order@lcjvs.net


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode #09-45 /1666th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 11/09/2009 through Sunday 11/15/2009

"Predictions Are For A Really Good
Leonid Meteor Shower Next Week!"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Every November we are treated to a meteor shower which appears to originate from Leo the Lion. So we call this event the Leonid meteor shower. Last year it was a dud because bright moonlight wiped out all but the very brightest of meteors. But this year ta da!, there'll be no moonlight to interfere. So if you get far away from city lights and it's clear out you should be able to catch quite a few. Plus some experts predict a stronger than usual shower this year.

Now the best time to look this year is between the hours of midnight and dawn next Tuesday morning November 17th. We've set up our skies at the mid point about 3 a.m. facing east where half way up from the horizon you'll see the bright stars which make up Leo the Lion. The front part of Leo is marked by stars which trace out a sickle shape or backwards question mark. And Leo's rear is marked by three stars which form a triangle. Plus this year you'll see a bright light above Leo's head which usually isn't there, planet number four, rouge-gold Mars.

Now every November on the night or nights of the Leonid meteor shower bright streaks of light which we call meteors flash across the sky and appear to come from Leo's head. But it's only an optical illusion because the meteors are million of times closer than Leo's stars. You see meteors are nothing more than tiny bits of comet debris that slam into our Earth's atmosphere so fast that they heat up and incinerate and cause gasses in our Earth's atmosphere to briefly light up, kind of like the gasses in a neon tube. So the streak of light you're seeing is not actually the meteor itself but the lit up gaseous path along which the speck is traveling. "But where do these specks come from ?", you ask.

Well most meteors are caused by comet litter. You see every time a comet visits our Sun it sheds some of its tail and leaves a trail of debris in its orbit. So after hundreds of years and dozens of passages many comet orbits become filled with tiny specks of comet debris. The comet which causes the Leonids is named comet Tempel-Tuttle. It last paid our sun a visit back in 1998 and won't be back again until 2031. But every November our Earth plows right through comet Tempel-Tuttle's littered orbital pathway so that many specks of debris slam into our Earth's atmosphere and leave the trails we call the Leonid meteors. Now most of these specks are very tiny and leave very faint trails but there are always a few bigger specks and they can leave brilliant trails which will make you gasp with delight.

Because there is no bright moonlight this year you can expect to see 15 to 20 meteors per hour or even more if you follow the rules for maximum viewing. Simply get as far from city lights as possible and watch from about midnight to dawn Tuesday morning. Lay back in a sleeping bag or a lawn chair with your feet pointing east and slowly scan the sky back and forth. And if you do that for at least a couple hours you should see a few bright ones, more perhaps toward dawn. Do not use a telescope or binoculars. This is strictly a naked eye event, which is my favorite kind. See how many you can count in one hour's time. Keep looking up!

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"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#09-45 M

11/09/2009 thru 11/15/2009

"Predictions Are For A Really Good
Leonid Meteor Shower Next Week!"

Horkheimer: Next Tuesday morning from midnight to dawn we'll be treated to a better than usual Leonid meteor shower. Every November our Earth plows through a river of comet debris and when some of these specks of debris slam into our Earth's atmosphere at speeds of 160 thousand miles per hour they heat up the gasses in our Earth's atmosphere and leave trails of light which we call the Leonid meteors because they appear to come from Leo the lion. You may see 15 to 20 or even more per hour if you get far from city lights and watch a couple of hours from midnight to dawn. Lay back on a lawn chair and slowly scan the sky and have plenty of patience. No telescopes allowed it's a naked eye event only, which is my favorite kind. Keep looking up!


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One Hour Feed STAH 905
Tuesday October 20, 2009, 1100-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 0944, 0945, 0946, 0947, 0948


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)
NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators
Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 /
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core
nasa_order@lcjvs.net


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 Click Here

 Click Here

 Click Here

STAR GAZER

Episode # 09-46 / 1667th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 11/16/2009 through Sunday 11/22/2009

"The Queen Of November Nights
Rides High On Thanksgiving"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Some constellations are easy to find and some are difficult. But one of autumn's most famous constellations is very easy to find any night in November because she is at her highest from sunset to midnight. And she'll be fun to look for after thanksgiving dinner. Let me show you.

Go out between 8 and 10 p.m. look due north and you'll see 5 bright stars which if you connect with lines trace out a squashed out letter "m". This is the constellation Cassiopeia named for a legendary queen of exceptional beauty of ancient Ethiopia. But how does this squashed out "m" shape remind anyone of a queen? Well if we add a dim little star to the 5 we can trace out a nice stick figure of Cassiopeia's throne. At this time of year and night however she'd have to be glued to it or wear a seat belt because she is hanging face downward over the North Star. Now if you look directly opposite Cassiopeia on the other side of the North Star, close to the horizon you will see the Big Dipper.

And one of the nifty things about Cassiopeia and the Big Dipper is that they circle endlessly around the North Star, always opposite each other, like the hands of a clock. For instance if we move forward in time by six hours you'll notice that Cassiopeia's throne is almost upright and the Big Dipper has moved to the right of the North Star. Six hours later Cassiopeia is beneath the North Star and the Big Dipper above it and so on, a great celestial clock, which incidentally is one of the functions these two constellations served for our clockless ancestors. But why you may ask would anyone put a great queen on a sky throne when her throne is so often upside down in a precarious position?

Well it seems that Cassiopeia claimed that she was the most beautiful creature on Earth, which didn't sit very well with certain ancient deities. So as punishment for her vanity she was placed in the heavens on her throne and forced to ride around the North Star for all eternity, sometimes in a queenly upright position but more often in a less than royal posture. And Cassiopeia still serves as a cosmic object lesson to mere mortals who brag of their personal beauty.

Today Cassiopeia is marked by 5 bright stars. But 473 years ago this month, in November 1572, astronomers all around the world watched a new star slowly grow in brightness in addition the five, a star which outshone every other star in the sky for many weeks and which was visible for over a year. We now know that it was a giant exploding star called a supernova. But all that remains in this spot now are the ghostly echoes of its shattered remnants still flying at great speed through space and time. So get thee out and look for an ancient queen whose vanity "done her in" and who once had a super star visitor that gives the name super star a whole different meaning. Invite a queen to your thanksgiving feast and keep looking up!


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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#09-46 M

11/16/2009 thru 11/22/2009

"The Queen Of November Nights
Rides High On Thanksgiving"

Horkheimer: Every November and Thanksgiving the constellation queen Cassiopeia rides high. On November nights between 8 and 10 p.m. look north and you will see five bright stars which trace out the letter "m". Add a dim star and you can imagine Cassiopeia's throne here on which she rides endlessly around the North Star as punishment for her vanity, strapped in no doubt by a very ancient seat belt. 437 years ago this month she had a visitor, a brilliant new star which outshone every star in the sky, which we now know was a giant exploding star, a supernova whose shattered remains we can still see here, a super star visitor for a super queen. So brighten your Thanksgiving night with cosmic royalty. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

One Hour Feed STAH 905
Tuesday October 20, 2009, 1100-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 0944, 0945, 0946, 0947, 0948


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)
NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators
Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 /
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core
nasa_order@lcjvs.net


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 

 
 

STAR GAZER

Episode # 09-47 / 1668th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 11/23/2009 through Sunday 11/29/2009

"Thanksgiving Week's Stars And
Start Your Mars Watch Now"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Every year at Thanksgiving I like to remind you about three cosmic birds in addition to the turkey on the table. And this year will be no exception. However I'd also like to point out a few other wonderful cosmic objects, which you can see after Thanksgiving dinner as a kind of heavenly dessert. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for any night this Thanksgiving week about 8 p.m. facing southwest where the brightest thing you'll see will be the king of the planets Jupiter. In addition to looking wonderful to the naked eye it is exciting to watch through a small telescope with its four largest moons constantly changing orbit around it. Next if you look to the right of Jupiter due west you'll see three bright stars which make up the Summer Triangle, but which I call the Thanksgiving for-the-birds triangle because each star is related to a bird. Altair is the brightest star in Aquila the Eagle, Deneb is the brightest star in Cygnus the Swan and Vega is the brightest star in Lyra the Harp which thousands of years ago had several feathery reincarnations. So you've got three cosmic birds in addition to your Thanksgiving turkey.

Next look almost overhead and you'll see four much dimmer stars, which mark the Great Square of Pegasus, which is one of autumn's most prominent constellations. But what I think is really nifty is if you look to the east you'll see most of winter's brightest stars just beginning to rise. Three stars lined up in a row mark Orion's belt, two bright stars mark his shoulders and two bright stars mark his knees. Close beside him are the two brightest stars of the Gemini Twins, Castor and Pollux and above them both the bright red star Aldebaran, which marks the eye of Taurus the Bull. And right beside it if you're far from city lights and have dark skies you'll see one of my favorite groups of stars the very tiny but exquisite Pleiades, the Seven Sisters and below it the bright star Capella of Auriga the Charioteer.

So any Thanksgiving week night if you go outside around 8 p.m. you'll see not only the Summer Triangle getting ready to set but most of winter's stars starting to rise plus the winged horse Pegasus almost overhead. But aha! this year there is something very special added because if you wait until around 11 p.m. and look east you'll see a bright reddish gold object rising and that dear friends is the planet Mars which you can watch get steadily brighter night after night until it reaches its brightest on January 29 when it will be at opposition and at its closest and brightest for this meeting with Earth, a meeting which we experience every 26 months. So start your Mars watch now as it grows brighter every single night and gets higher in the heavens each night at the same time. Happy Thanksgiving and keep looking up!


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"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#09-47 M

11/23/2009 thru 11/29/2009

"Thanksgiving Week's Stars And
Start Your Mars Watch Now"

Horkheimer: Cosmic goodies await you after Thanksgiving dinner. Thanksgiving week about 8 p.m. face southwest and the planet king will beg you to look at it through a small telescope. Look west and you'll see the three bright stars, which make up the Summer Triangle. Each star is related to a bird so in addition to your Thanksgiving turkey you've got three cosmic birds after dinner. Look east and you'll see most of winter's brightest stars just rising, Orion the hunter, the Gemini Twins, Taurus the Bull and the tiny but exquisite Pleiades, the Seven Sisters. Plus at 11 o'clock you'll see rouge gold Mars rising. Watch it get brighter every single night until it reaches super brightness January 29th! Happy cosmic Thanksgiving and keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer



STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

One Hour Feed STAH 905
Tuesday October 20, 2009, 1100-1200/SD06
Includes episodes 0944, 0945, 0946, 0947, 0948


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE (Contact us for current price)
NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators
Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 /
http://www.nasa.gov/education/core
nasa_order@lcjvs.net


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

 Click Here

 Click Here

 Click Here

STAR GAZER

Episode # 09-48 / 1669th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 11/30/2009 through Sunday 12/06/2009

"Dates to Remember In December : Several Cosmic Goodies
Await Your Viewing Pleasure"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. In addition to all the holiday gift gifting going on, December will be gifting us with several goodies from the cosmos. Because December is one of those peculiar months which will have two full moons, one of which will be on New Year's Eve. Plus two wonderful planets will share opposite sides of the sky before midnight. And what may be the best meteor shower of the year, the Geminids, will give us something to ooh and aah about. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for next Tuesday December 1st just after sunset where you will see an almost, just a few hours away from full, Moon rising, which according to some American natives is called the full cold Moon. It will slowly travel up the sky and reach its highest point around midnight. And as it slowly starts to descend it will officially turn full Tuesday morning at 2:30 a.m. Eastern Time and will finally set at sunrise. Full moon number two will occur on new year's eve Thursday December 31st. Called the Long Night Moon, because the hours of darkness are always longest at this time of year in the northern hemisphere, it will also rise just after sunset and be visible in the sky all night long, reaching its highest point around midnight, and will be super high and will look almost like a floodlight attached to the top of the sky illuminating the landscape below as we ring in the New Year. And if there's snow the scene at midnight will be absolutely dazzling.

The next dates I'd like you to mark down are late evening Sunday Dec. 13th and midnight to dawn Monday the 14th when the annual Geminid meteor shower may be the best of the year. Interestingly, unlike all other meteor showers which are usually better after midnight, the Geminid meteor shower is frequently good before midnight. But like all meteor showers, the longer you stay out, the more meteors you'll see.

And now for you planet aficionados, you'll have two really good ones to choose from before midnight. To see the first simply look toward the west just after sunset and you'll see dazzlingly bright, king of the planets, 88,000 mile wide Jupiter, eleven times the width of our planet Earth which is always fun to see through even the smallest of telescopes because you can watch four of his largest moons as they change place in orbit around the planet hour after hour. And as Jupiter sets in late evening you can turn around and face east and between 10 and 11 you'll see the 4,000 mile wide rouge gold planet Mars rising. And Mars is the one to watch because it is zooming closer and closer to us every single day. And will be brighter each successive night. In fact it will grow almost two times brighter from December 1st to the 31st. So trace the progress of Mars and Jupiter this month, watch the Geminid meteor shower on the 13th and 14th and bathe under the light of two full Moons in one month's time. Cosmic goodies indeed. Keep looking up!


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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Star Gazer" is available with iTunes,
for downloading with Quicktime
and we're now on YouTube

Check Out WPBT's Version

 
 
 
 

Star Gazer Minute

#09-48 M

11/30/2009 thru 12/06/2009

"Dates to Remember In December : Several Cosmic Goodies
Await Your Viewing Pleasure"

Horkheimer: Cosmic goodies fill December's skies. There'll be two full Moons this December, the first next week on December 1st and 2nd and another on New Year's Eve. Plus there are two planets you really must watch. After sunset face southwest and it will beg you to look at it through a small telescope and watch its four moons waltz around it. Look east after 11 p.m. and you can watch the red planet Mars grow brighter every single night until it reaches super brightness on January 29th. Plus next week Sunday evening the 13th and Monday morning the 14th the annual Geminid meteor shower may be the best of the year. What a month, two full Moons, two bright planets and a meteor shower that just may knock your socks off. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


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