STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

10/25/99 10:30 - 11:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from

NASA CORE

A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00

plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard,

check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address

below:

 

Lorain County JVS - NASA CORE

15181 Route 58 South

Oberlin, OH 44074

440/775-1400

FAX 440/775-1460

nasaco@leeca.esu.k12.oh.us

http://spacelink.nasa.gov/CORE

 

Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


STAR GAZER

Episode # 99-44

1143rd Show

To Be Aired : Monday 11/1/99 through

Sunday 11/7/99

"Saturn : At Opposition This Week And As Big And

As Bright As It Ever Gets!"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star and planet gazers. And as you regular viewers know, the two biggest planets of them all, Jupiter and Saturn, are right now as big and as bright as they ever get. And since my favorite of the two is Saturn I'd like to give you a little more ringed planet info.

O.K., We've got our skies set up for any clear night this week, just after sunset. And if you look due east you will see a wonderfully brilliant light which is the king of the planets Jupiter and just about one and a half fists below it, not as bright but as bright as it ever gets, the second biggest planet Saturn. And this Saturday - the very day of the week named for Saturn - November 6th, Saturn is officially at what astronomers call opposition, which simply means that it is directly opposite the sun as seen from earth and is also at its closest for the year. Now although Saturn comes into opposition every year, nevertheless, this is the closest opposition of Saturn in 22 years. Which means that it is now brighter than any one has seen it in 22 years. Indeed, many of you out there will have never seen it this bright.

Now although I mentioned it last week, let me repeat that because Saturn is at opposition it will remain in the sky all night long this week and next. It will rise in the east at sunset, reach its highest point around midnight and will set in the west at sunrise. And will follow Jupiter along Jupiter's path because Jupiter was at opposition only a couple of weeks ago.

Now I would like to clarify something about Saturn's size, and its standing as the second largest planet, because in a sense it's really the largest. You see, 88,000 mile wide Jupiter, is called the king of the planets, because it is 13,000 miles wider than 75,000 mile wide Saturn. But if we measure Saturn from one edge of its ring system to the other edge we discover that Saturn's ring system is 176,000 miles wide, which is exactly two times the width of Jupiter, which means that we could line up two Jupiters side by side from one edge of Saturns rings to the other. But in astronomy, Saturn's rings don't count when we refer to planet size. So Jupiter remains the king.

Even so one would expect that when you're looking through a small telescope at Jupiter and Saturn that Saturn would look almost twice as wide as Jupiter, whereas in fact Saturn looks almost two times smaller. The reason is simple, Saturn is twice as far away. You see while Jupiter is only half a billion miles away from the sun, Saturn is one billion miles beyond. Which also explains why even though it's at its brightest right now in 22 years it is still much dimmer than Jupiter which is at its brightest in 12 years.

But Saturn does have it all over Jupiter in one area and that's moons. Indeed, while Jupiter has 16 known moons, Saturn has over 20. And although Jupiter's Ganymede is the largest moon in the solar system, Saturn's 3200 mile wide Titan is only 70 miles smaller. And it is far more interesting because it's the only moon in our solar system with a substantial atmosphere. And it may even harbor the beginnings of life. At any rate, make sure you get a look at Saturn sometime this month with both the naked eye and hopefully through a telescope because this month it is as big and as bright as it gets and it just begs to be seen which is easy if you just Keep Looking Up!

For graphics for this script (Click) Here


Star Gazer Minute

#99-44 M

11/1/99 thru 11/7/99

"Is Jupiter The Biggest Planet?"

 

Horkheimer: If you look east any night the next couple of weeks just after sunset you will see two bright lights. The brightest, 88 thousand mile wide Jupiter is now at its brightest in 12 years. Just below it, 75 thousand mile wide Saturn is also at its brightest in 22 years. Now although Jupiter is officially the largest planet, if we count the distance from one edge of Saturn's rings to the other Saturn would be bigger. In fact, we could line 2 Jupiters up side by side across Saturn's rings. Whatever, take a look at these 2 through even the cheapest department store telescope now and you'll be absolutely blown away. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For graphics for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of

 

To Subscribe

(only $26.95 for 9 issues)

contact

'ODYSSEY'

30 Grove Street

Suite C

Peterborough, NH 03458

or Click Here


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

10/25/99 10:30 - 11:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)


 

Star Gazer is also available from

NASA CORE

A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00

plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard,

check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address

below:

 

Lorain County JVS - NASA CORE

15181 Route 58 South

Oberlin, OH 44074

440/775-1400

FAX 440/775-1460

nasaco@leeca.esu.k12.oh.us

http://spacelink.nasa.gov/CORE





Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #99-45


1144th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 11/8/99 through Sunday 11/14/99

"Will History Repeat Itself?

Will Next Week's Leonid Meteor Shower

Turn Into A Meteor Storm? "

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. On the morning of November 13th, 1833 thousands of North Americans ran into the streets to see what many thought was the end of the world as thousands of shooting stars fell from the heavens in a display that both terrified and amazed. In fact, even a young aAbraham Lincoln leapt out of bed to witness this day of judgment event, an event which was so vivid and memorable that he referred to it during the throes of the Civil War telling a group of nervous bankers that "Flying from my bed I saw the stars falling in great showers, but I also saw all the grand old constellations with which I was so well acquainted fixed and true in their places. The world did not come to an end then nor will the Union now."

Then 133 years later, on November 17, 1966 the event repeated itself over the southwestern United States and an estimated 100 thousand shooting stars were reported in just one hour. But this time scientists knew this was not the end of the world, but rather the great meteor storm called the Leonids which may occur again next week over some part of our planet Earth. You see every year during the 2nd week of November our earth plows through a meteor stream which is really a river of comet debris spread along the orbit of an old comet called TTuttle. And when our Earth slams into these pieces of comet debris we experience the annual Leonid Meteor Shower, so called because the meteors appear, because of perspective, to come from the constellation Leo the Lion. Now usually we experience about 10 to 20 meteors per hour, nothing really exceptional.

But every 33 years Comet Tempel-Tuttle comes back toward our Earth and the Sun and when that happens we sometimes pass through a much denser portion of comet debris than usual and experience a meteor storm with thousands of meteors per hour instead of the usual meteor shower. And since Comet Tempel-Tuttle recently passed close by, some part of our Earth may ride through a densely packed area of debris and experience a meteor storm. But if such a storm does occur we can't predict what part of our earth will experience it. Some favor Europe. However, even though the meteor storm will be seen over a limited area, nevertheless you can expect to see many more meteors than usual no matter where you are.

The best time for North America is Thursday the 18th from 1 A.M. until dawn. To see it bundle up on a lawn chair, stay outside for at least a couple of hours and just slowly scan the sky back and forth. And whenever you do see a meteor remember it's only a tiny bit of comet debris, anywhere from a grain of sand to a small pebble, slamming into Earth's atmosphere at 160 thousand miles per hour and plunging to its fiery death. But don't worry about getting hit because almost all meteors burn up 50 to 75 miles above the ground. Will history repeat itself? No one knows but if it does you don't want to miss it, so get thee outside next Thursday morning and for heavens sake Keep Looking Up!

 

Special Leonid Web Links:

http://science.nasa.gov/newhome/headlines/ast27oct99_1.htm

http://science.nasa.gov/newhome/headlines/ast10nov99_1.htm

http://www.thursdaysclassroom.com/index_28oct99.html#lessons

http://www.sciencerules.com/newhome/headlines/ast22jun99_2.htm

For graphics for this script (Click) Here


Star Gazer Minute

#99-45 M

11/8/99 thru 11/14/99

"Next Week's Possible Meteor Storm!"

 

Horkheimer: On November 13, 1833, thousands of Americans, including a young Abraham Lincoln, watched awe struck as thousands of shooting stars fell from the heavens in a display many believed heralded the end of the world. On November 17, 1966 it happened again, but this time astronomers knew it was simply the Leonid Meteor Shower which every 33 years sometimes becomes a great meteor storm and which may occur again next Thursday between 1 a.m. and sunrise, when our earth may plunge directly into a huge river of comet debris strewn out in the wake of Comet Tempel-Tuttle which recently paid us a visit. Will history repeat itself? Will we see thousands of pieces of comet debris plunge to their fiery deaths? I'm Jack Horkheimer. Keep Looking Up!

Special Leonid Web Links:

http://science.nasa.gov/newhome/headlines/ast27oct99_1.htm

http://science.nasa.gov/newhome/headlines/ast10nov99_1.htm

http://www.thursdaysclassroom.com/index_28oct99.html#lessons

http://www.sciencerules.com/newhome/headlines/ast22jun99_2.htm



For graphics for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of

 

To Subscribe

(only $26.95 for 9 issues)

contact

'ODYSSEY'

30 Grove Street

Suite C

Peterborough, NH 03458

or Click Here




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

10/25/99 10:30 - 11:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from

NASA CORE

A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00

plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard,

check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address

below:

 

Lorain County JVS - NASA CORE

15181 Route 58 South

Oberlin, OH 44074

440/775-1400

FAX 440/775-1460

nasaco@leeca.esu.k12.oh.us

http://spacelink.nasa.gov/CORE




Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 99-46


1145th Show


To Be Aired : Monday 11/15/99 through Sunday 11/21/99

"A Meteor Storm Alert!

And Our Moon Pays A Visit

To The Two Largest Planets!"
 

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. And just a reminder that this Thursday some lucky people may experience an incredible Leonid Meteor Storm of thousands upon thousands of meteors falling to Earth, because the comet responsible for this annual meteor shower recently passed by and thus we may ride through denser portions of meteoritic comet debris. Your best chance of seeing this is Thursday the 18th between 1 a.m. and sunrise.

Bundle up, lie back on a lawn chair and slowly scan the skies for a couple of hours and you will see more meteors than usual even if you don't get a meteor storm. And this weekend you can watch the moon as it pays a visit to the two giant gas planets Jupiter and Saturn. O.K., We've got our skies set up for this Saturday evening November 20th, 8 p.m. your local time and if you look southeast you will see a very bright 12 day old moon right under the king of the planets, 88 thousand mile wide Jupiter which is still almost at its brightest in 12 years. Then if you go out the next night, Sunday November 21st at 8 p.m. a 13 day old moon will be huddled right under the 75 thousand mile wide ringed planet Saturn which is still at its brightest in 22 years.

And may I urge all of you in the strongest terms to make sure that some time this month you take a look at Jupiter and Saturn through even the cheapest department store telescope because you absolutely won't believe how exquisitely beautiful they appear. Indeed right now we're seeing them as big and as bright as they ever get. Find a friend with a telescope or an amateur astronomical club, a museum or a planetarium near you, but whatever you do make sure you see Jupiter and Saturn this month.

You'll be amazed when you look you look at Saturn because you'll also be able to see its largest moon, 3 thousand mile wide Titan which is actually as big as the planet Mercury, and if you look at Jupiter through a telescope or binoculars just after sunset this Saturday night you'll see Jupiter's 4 largest moons all lined up in a row in order of their distance from Jupiter. They'll look like tiny dots of light, but in fact they are giant worlds. Closest to Jupiter you'll see Io, second out Europa, third out Ganymede, and fourth out Callisto.

Ganymede, which is also bigger then the planet Mercury is just a few miles larger than Saturn's Titan which makes it the largest moon in our solar system, over a thousand miles wider than our own moon. Now you can remember Jupiter's 4 great moons in their proper order if you remember this little phrase: I Eat Green Caterpillars. I for Io, E for Europa, G for Ganymede and C for Callisto. And if you watch later in the evening you'll actually see Io change places with Europa. Wow! What a great week. Two giant planets at their brightest and the possibility of a meteor storm. Is it any wonder that I always ask you to Keep Looking Up?

Special Leonid Web Links:

http://science.nasa.gov/newhome/headlines/ast27oct99_1.htm

http://science.nasa.gov/newhome/headlines/ast10nov99_1.htm

http://www.thursdaysclassroom.com/index_28oct99.html#lessons

http://www.sciencerules.com/newhome/headlines/ast22jun99_2.htm


For graphics for this script (Click) Here

 


Star Gazer Minute

#99-46 M

11/15/99 thru 11/21/99

"I Eat Green Caterpillars"

 

Horkheimer: If you look east this Saturday night just after sunset you'll see Jupiter just above an almost full moon and if you look at it through a small telescope, or even binoculars, you will see Jupiter's 4 largest moons all lined up in a row in order of their distance from Jupiter. They'll look like tiny dots of light but in fact they're giant worlds. Closest to jupiter you'll see Io, second out Europa, third out Ganymede and 4th out Callisto. Ganymede is a thousand miles wider than our own moon and the largest moon in our solar system. To remember these moons in their proper order remember this little phrase: I Eat Green Caterpillars. I for Io, E for Europa, G for Ganymede, and C for Callisto. Rather icky but effective. I'm Jack Horkheimer, Keep Looking Up!

For graphics for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of

 

To Subscribe

(only $26.95 for 9 issues)

contact

'ODYSSEY'

30 Grove Street

Suite C

Peterborough, NH 03458

or Click Here


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

10/25/99 10:30 - 11:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE

A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00

plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard,

check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address

below:

 

Lorain County JVS - NASA CORE

15181 Route 58 South

Oberlin, OH 44074

440/775-1400

FAX 440/775-1460

nasaco@leeca.esu.k12.oh.us

http://spacelink.nasa.gov/CORE



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

 

STAR GAZER

Episode #99-47


1146th Show



To Be Aired : Monday 11/22/99 through Sunday 11/28/99

"Another Cosmic Triangle and

The Time Machine Effect!"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and for those of you who missed the absolutely breathtaking cosmic triangle of the moon, the planet Venus, and the star Regulus on October 5th, not to worry, because we have another cosmic triangle coming up next week Friday December the 3rd. Plus if you want to find the tiny planet Mercury, you'll be able to use the moon as a finder next weekend December 4th and 5th.

Let me show you, O.K., We've got our skies set up for next Thursday December 2nd about an hour before sunrise facing southeast. Where you will see an exquisite crescent moon and down to its left the still brilliant planet Venus. Which because it is so bright at this time makes ordinarily bright first magnitude stars look dim by comparison. So if you look slightly up and to Venus' right you'll see a star which ordinarily looks much brighter than when Venus is nearby, first magnitude blue-white star Spica. The brightest star of the spring constellation Virgo the Virgin.

Now although this sky picture will be quite lovely Thursday the 2nd, the real show will be the next two days, indeed, on the next morning, Friday December 3rd, the moon will have moved down closer to Venus and will form an exquisite cosmic triangle with Venus and Spica. And you may even see the phenomenon called "the old moon in the new moon's arms" which looks like a very pale dim full moon nestled inside the bright crescent. a phenomenon called "earthshine" because the dimly lit portion of the moon is actually sunlight bouncing off our earth on to the moon and back to us again.

And while you're gazing up at this exquisite trio of celestial objects think of this. While the moon will be the brightest of the 3, nevertheless it is the least significant cosmic wise, as it is simply a 2,000 mile wide object, 245 thousand miles away the morning of December 3rd. And while Venus is the second brightest object nevertheless, it is only second in significance in this triangle as it is only an Earth sized planet 8,000 miles wide and is a mere 87 million miles away December 3rd. Spica on the other hand appearing the dimmest of the 3 is really the greatest because it is a 1.9 million mile wide star - that's twice the size of our sun - 260 light years away.

Or think of it this way. As you gaze up at the moon December 3rd you are seeing the light which left it only a second and a half ago, whereas the light from Venus left it almost 8 minutes ago. Spica on the other hand is so far away that the light we see from it on December 3rd left it 260 years ago. In other words we are seeing the moon as it actually existed a second and a half ago, Venus as it existed 8 minutes ago and Spica as it existed 260 years ago. Indeed, when we gaze at the cosmos we never ever really see things as they actually exist but as they existed some time in the past depending upon their distance from us. So don't miss this cosmic triangle. If you do, however, on Saturday December 4th, the moon and Venus and Spica will still be exquisite and almost lined up in a row. It may be a bit chilly out but it will still be a bit awe inspiring if you simply remember to Keep Looking Up!


 

For graphics for this script (Click) Here


Star Gazer Minute

#99-47 M

11/22/99 thru 11/28/99

"A Cosmic Triangle and

The Time Machine Effect"

 

Horkheimer: Greetings, if you look south east Friday morning December 3rd you will see an exquisite cosmic triangle made up of a 2 thousand mile wide crescent moon, 8 thousand mile wide planet Venus and the 2 million mile wide star Spica. Now although they will appear close to each other, in reality they are vast distances apart. If we use the speed of light which is 186 thousand miles a second as a yard stick, we will be seeing the moon as it actually existed only a second and a half ago; Venus as it existed 8 minutes ago and Spica as it existed 260 years ago. I'm Jack Horkheimer inviting you to see this cosmic time effect. Just Keep Looking Up!

For graphics for this script (Click) Here

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of

 

To Subscribe

(only $26.95 for 9 issues)

contact

'ODYSSEY'

30 Grove Street

Suite C

Peterborough, NH 03458

or Click Here


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only
Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

10/25/99 10:30 - 11:30 am Eastern time (5 shows)


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE

A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00

plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard,

check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address

below:

 

Lorain County JVS - NASA CORE

15181 Route 58 South

Oberlin, OH 44074

440/775-1400

FAX 440/775-1460

nasaco@leeca.esu.k12.oh.us

http://spacelink.nasa.gov/CORE



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

 

STAR GAZER

Episode #99-48


1147th Show



To Be Aired : Monday 11/29/99 through Sunday 12/05/99

"The Moon Meets The Iron Pink Planet!"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and just a quick reminder that if you go out this Friday morning, December 3rd about an hour before sunrise you will see an exquisite cosmic triangle of a crescent moon, an absolutely brilliant planet Venus and the brightest star of Virgo the Virgin, Spica. The following morning, Saturday December 4th, an even skinnier crescent moon will have moved down below Venus and will provide yet another dazzling sky picture.

And then if you go out the next morning, Sunday December 5th, just before dawn, you will se an even skinnier crescent moon hovering just above the most difficult to find of all the naked eye planets, a planet which we now know is made almost entirely of iron, the first planet out from the sun, the pink planet, tiny 3,000 mile wide Mercury. Now the reason Mercury is so difficult to find is because it never gets very far away from the sun as seen from the Earth.

Let me explain: you see our Earth, planet number 3 is 93 million miles away from the Sun but tiny planet number 1, Mercury is only 36 million miles away from the Sun. Now while our Earth travels at a speed of 66 thousand miles per hour in its orbit around the sun, Mercury moves almost twice as fast, about 105 thousand miles per hour. So because our Earth is so much farther away and moves much slower, it takes our Earth 365 Earth days to make one journey around the Sun whereas Mercury is so close and so fast it makes one trip around the sun once every 88 Earth days. So there are over 4 Mercury years in one Earth year, and the only time we can ever get a glimpse of Mercury from our Earth is when Mercury is at its farthest distance east or west of the Sun as seen from Earth.

Now although Mercury makes several of these appearances every year nevertheless it is visible for only a couple of weeks at a time and it frequently never gets far enough away to really be seen well. But this week and next are the exception to the rule because for the next two weeks Mercury will appear about as far away from the Sun as it ever gets as seen from mid northern latitudes. But you have to have a clear and unobstructed horizon. The best day to find it for most of you will be just before sunrise Sunday the 5th because then you can use the moon as a finder because the moon will be hovering just above it.

And if you look at Mercury through a small telescope you will see that it goes through phases just like our moon and this weekend it will be at 3/4 phase. Even the most powerful telescope on earth cannot see any detail on Mercury. In fact, it wasn't until 1974 when spacecraft Mariner 10 flew by that we saw the first close ups of Mercury. And guess what? Not only does Mercury go through phases like our moon, Mercury looks like our moon. It is peppered with thousands of craters. But more amazingly, Mercury's iron core is actually larger than our entire moon. In fact, at earth's current production rate for iron it would take 700 billion years to mine all the iron in Mercury's core. So get thee out to see this amazing pink iron planet, which is easy if you simply remember to Keep Looking Up!

 

For graphics for this script (Click) Here


Star Gazer Minute

#99-48 M

11/29/99 thru 12/05/99

"The Iron Pink Planet"

 

Horkheimer: If you've never seen tiny 3 thousand mile wide Mercury, this week and next is as good as it gets. And if you look east this Sunday morning, December 5th just before dawn an exquisite crescent moon will be hovering just above it. Mercury rarely gets this high above the horizon and because we always see it through dusty layers of earth's atmosphere these dusty layers colorize the planet a lovely shade of pink. And although it's only a thousand miles wider than our own moon, its iron core is actually larger than our moon. In fact, it would take 700 billion years to mine all the iron in Mercury's core. I'm Jack Horkheimer for the pink iron planet reminding you to Keep Looking Up!

For graphics for this script (Click) Here

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of

'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of

 

To Subscribe

(only $26.95 for 9 issues)

contact

'ODYSSEY'

30 Grove Street

Suite C

Peterborough, NH 03458

or Click Here


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only
Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer





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