STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Tuesday 9/20/05 - 1000-1100 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 05-40 / 1452nd Show
To Be Aired : Monday 10/03/2005 through
Sunday 10/09/2005

"Venus And Mars' Rival Pay Each Other
A Very Close Visit"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Last week I explained how this week the Moon would pay a visit to both the brightest planet Venus and the star called "the Rival of Mars" Antares. And this week I'd like to show you how to watch the slow approach and very close meeting of Venus and Antares.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for Thursday this week October 6th about 45 minutes after Sunset facing southwest where you'll see an exquisite crescent Moon parked right beneath our twin sister planet 8,000 mile wide Venus which is a sight that will truly knock your socks off. Then on the next night Friday the 7th the Moon will almost slam into Antares whose name literally means the rival of Mars because it resembles Mars in color and when Mars is at the right distance, looks the same brightness. But Antares is not an 8,000 mile wide planet like Venus, it is a super star. So huge that if we placed one edge of it where our Sun is it would stretch out past the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars and Jupiter. In fact it is so huge it could hold 280 trillion Venuses or Earths.

So this week you have a chance to see our 2,000 mile wide Moon visit both Venus on the 6th and Antares on the 7th. After which it will move farther and farther away night after night. But then something magical happens between Venus and Antares because they will slowly approach each other night after night and have a super close meeting a week from this Sunday, on October 16th. And I guarantee that if you go out every night just after sunset and keep track of these two you will be amazed at how dramatically they'll change their position from night to night.

This Friday when the Moon is close to Antares, Antares and Venus will be 10 degrees apart from each other or to put it simply, since a full Moon is one half a degree wide they will be 20 full Moon widths apart from each other but not for long because the following night they will be 2 full Moon widths closer, only 9 degrees apart. On Sunday the 9th, 2 full Moon widths closer still only 8 degrees apart, and on Monday the 10th another 2 full Moons closer only 7 degrees apart. On Tuesday 2 full Moons closer still only 6 degrees apart. And then on Wednesday, you guessed it, also 2 full Moons closer or 5 degrees apart. On Thursday they'll be a whopping 3 Moons closer only 3 and 1/2 degrees will separate them. And on Friday they really start to close in and are only 3 degrees or 6 full Moons apart. On Saturday 2 degrees or 4 full Moons apart. And ta da! on Sunday the 16th they'll have their closest meeting of all when only 3 full Moons would separate them, little more than 1 and 1/2 degrees apart! So Sunday the 16th is the night when the brightest planet visits the rival of Mars! After which they will slowly move away from each other. Indeed on Monday the 17th they'll once again be 2 degrees away from each other or 4 full Moons apart. Wow what fun! Keep track of them every single night. It's addictive. Keep looking up!

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#05-40 M

10/03/2005 thru 10/09/2005

"Venus And Mars' Rival Pay Each Other
A Very Close Visit"

Horkheimer: On Sunday October 16th super bright Venus will have a super close meeting with the super giant star Antares. This Friday the Moon will be parked right next to Antares and Venus will dazzle off to their right. Only 10 degrees or 20 full Moons will separate Antares and Venus on Friday. On Saturday only 9 degrees, Sunday 8 degrees, Monday 7 degrees, Tuesday 6 degrees, Wednesday 5 degrees, Thursday 3 1/2, Friday 3, Saturday 2 and ta da! On Sunday they'll be only 1 1/2 degrees or 3 full Moon widths apart! 8,000 mile wide Venus is brighter only because it's so close. Antares is much farther away but much, much larger, so huge in fact we could fit 280 trillion Venuses inside it. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Tuesday 9/20/05 - 1000-1100 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



 

STAR GAZER

Episode #05-41 /1453rd Show
To Be Aired : Monday 10/10/2005 through Sunday 10/16/2005

"Venus Visits Antares, And October's Wonderful Hunter's Moon
Visits Mars And The Seven Sisters"


Horkheimer: greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. This Sunday the brightest planet visits a super star plus beginning this Sunday and lasting for three nights we will experience an exquisite Hunter's Moon. And we'll be able to use it to find both the planet which is racing toward us, Mars and the legendary cluster of stars known as the Seven Sisters. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Sunday October 16th about an hour after sunset facing southwest where you'll be able to see the brightest planet of them all Venus in a super close meeting with the super red star called Antares. In fact only three full Moons placed side by side will separate these two this Sunday. Don't miss this dramatic meeting of an 8,000 mile wide planet and a 500 million mile wide star! Then if you turn around and face east you'll see October's magnificent full Moon, which we call the Hunter's Moon just rising. It should look very colorful, reddish orange pumpkin colored, almost like last month's Harvest Moon and will be visible Sunday, Monday and Tuesday night. Now although the Moon doesn't officially become full until 8:14 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time Monday morning it will look full on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday.

The reason it is called the Hunter's Moon is because that is the name given to the full Moon one month after the Harvest Moon. You see in September farmer's traditionally Harvested their fields by the light of that full Moon thus giving it its name the Harvest Moon, and one month later the Moon was named for the hunters who would venture out under the light of the full Moon after sunset hunting for the small game that came out to glean the fields by moonlight. So catch its beauty Sunday, Monday and Tuesday.

And speaking of Tuesday you'll be able to use this Moon to find brilliant Mars, which is racing towards us and is the third brightest thing in the sky right now after the Moon and Venus. I would suggest looking about three hours after sunset when it has risen high enough to clear most buildings and trees. And please if you haven't been watching Mars yet start watching it at least once or twice a week from now on because it will be at its closest, biggest and brightest on October 29th, brighter and closer than it will be until the year 2018.

And if that's not enough, if you've ever had a hard time finding the tiny cluster of stars which looks like a cluster of grapes, you can find the Seven Sisters, also known as The Pleiades, parked just above the Moon on Wednesday the 19th. One catch however, the Moon's light will be quite bright and will wipe out some of the light of The Pleiades. So make a mental note where they are in relation to Mars and then wait for a couple nights until the Moon is well past them to find them. So there you have it. Venus and Antares in a super close huddle this Sunday plus three nights of the Hunter's Moon and an easy way to find Mars and the Seven Sisters. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#05-41 M

10/10/2005 thru 10/16/2005

"October's Wonderful Hunter's Moon
Visits Mars And The Seven Sisters"

Horkheimer: Starting Sunday we will experience three nights of an exquisite Hunter's Moon. And you can use it to find Mars and the Seven Sisters. Face east after sunset this Sunday and you'll see October's pumpkin colored Hunter's Moon just rising. It will be visible all night and you'll also see it Monday and Tuesday night. The Hunter's Moon is the name given to the full Moon after the Harvest Moon because traditionally hunters would go out under the light of this full Moon to hunt the small game that came out to glean the harvested fields by moonlight. You can use it to find Mars on Tuesday and the Seven Sisters on Wednesday. Keep looking up!


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.



 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Tuesday 9/20/05 - 1000-1100 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 05-42 / 1454th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 10/17/2005 through Sunday 10/23/2005

"Celebrate This Halloween With Mars At Its Brightest
Until 2018 Accompanied By the Seven Sinister Sisters"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. This Halloween we'll have two very special objects for you to see in the sky all night long, Mars at its closest and brightest and the Seven Sisters, which historically have been viewed in a sinister light at this time of year. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for Halloween week and the week after facing south at midnight and if you look up almost overhead you will see super bright bloody red Mars which on the 29th will be at its closest and brightest for 13 years. And off to its left also almost overhead the legendary tiny cluster of stars called The Pleiades, the Seven Sisters which for hundreds of years have been associated with Halloween and other traditional days of the dead. Indeed, many ancient peoples believed that whenever the Seven Sisters reached their highest point at midnight, which happens every year about this time, it was a cosmic signal that this was the time of the year to honor the dead.

Now astronomically speaking whenever the Seven Sisters reach their highest point in the heavens we call this their culmination. And whenever they culminated at midnight some ancient cultures held great ceremonies in honor of this cosmic occurrence. Several myths tell us that there was a widespread belief that some great cataclysm occurred in ancient times when the Seven Sisters culminated at midnight. And the superstitious and gullible have speculated that this great cataclysm might have been the great flood of the Bible or the ten plagues of Egypt or even the sinking of Atlantis. In fact the ancient Aztec and Maya conducted spectacular ceremonies to celebrate the sisters culmination. And every 52 years when their two great calendars coincided they had a very special midnight culmination sacrifice because they believed that the world would actually come to an end on one of these "Seven Sisters overhead at midnight" nights. Indeed they actually believed that the world had already been destroyed and recreated not once but 4 times and always when the sisters were overhead at midnight.

Now although they no longer culminate at midnight on the exact same nights as they did long ago nevertheless you can still see them almost overhead at midnight every Halloween as a modern reminder that our ancestors were a lot more superstitious about the stars than we are. Today we know the Seven Sisters for what they really are. Because as seen through a telescope there are not just seven stars here but over one hundred, all much bigger and brighter than our Sun in a sphere 14 light years wide. Wow! And this Halloween we can see them almost overhead at midnight in the company of the planet Mars at its closest and brightest until 2018! Have a heavenly Halloween! And keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.

 


Star Gazer Minute

#05-42M

10/17/2005 thru 10/23/2005

"Celebrate This Halloween With Mars At Its Brightest
Until 2018 Accompanied By the Seven Sinister Sisters"

Horkheimer: This Halloween will sport two cosmic attractions, Mars at its closest and brightest and the Seven Sisters. This Halloween week face south at midnight and almost overhead you will see bloody red Mars at its closest and brightest for 13 years. And just to its left the tiny star cluster the Seven Sisters, long associated with Halloween and other days of the dead. Long ago the superstitious believed that the Pleiades were overhead at midnight during the great biblical flood and the sinking of Atlantis. And the Aztec and Maya believed that the world had been destroyed and recreated 4 times on such nights. Aren't you glad you're not superstitious? Happy Halloween! And keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Tuesday 9/20/05 - 1000-1100 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 05-43 / 1455th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 10/24/2005 through Sunday 10/30/2005

"Mars is At Its Biggest, Brightest And Closest
This Halloween Weekend"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and yes indeed the time has arrived because this Halloween weekend Mars will be at its biggest, brightest and closest until the year 2018 and will be the brightest object in the night sky after Venus sets in early evening. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this week and next 45 minutes after sunset facing southwest where you will see the brightest planet of them all, 8,000 mile wide Earth-sized Venus. So if you do your trick or treating early this weekend you'll be dazzled by this incredibly super bright white planet until about two hours after sunset when it will set. But if you turn around and look due east two hours after sunset you will see another super bright but rouge red gold object which after Venus sets will be the brightest object in the night sky because there will be no bright Moon visible this weekend.

In fact you'll be able to watch Mars travel across the sky all night long. It will reach its highest point just slightly south of overhead between midnight and 1 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time after which it will slowly descend the southwestern sky until it sets at dawn. And the beautiful part of it is that if you miss it on Halloween it will be almost as bright all this week and next. Actually Mars will be at its be at its absolute closest point to Earth two nights before Halloween on Saturday October 29th between 11:22 and 11:27 p.m. Eastern daylight time. Only 43 million, 137 thousand, 342 miles away from Earth, although for all practical purposes it will look almost as bright all this week and next. So to see Mars at the moments it's actually at its closest go out between 11:22 and 11:27 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time or your local equivalent and you'll be able to say that you saw Mars when it was the closest it will be for 13 more years!

And might I add that if you've been watching Mars approach in the past three or four months you watched it double in brightness in September and almost double again this October. And although people have mistakenly been led to believe by some internet sites that Mars is at its closest this week in 60,000 years, that is simply not true. Mars was at its closest in 60,000 years back in August of 2003. You see every 26 months Mars pays Earth a close visit. On August 27th, 2003 it came super close only 34.6 million miles away, then it slowly drifted to the other side of its orbit and on September 6, 2004 reached its farthest distance for this go round, 248 million miles. And ever since it has been slowly coming back toward us.

Of course I over simplify because our Earth has likewise been moving at the same time and it is their combined motions which cause the two to meet in relatively close proximity planetwise every 26 months. So there you have it, Mars at its closest for Halloween. And just off to its left also almost overhead at midnight the legendary Seven Sisters which you can easily see this Halloween night because there will be no bright Moonlight to wipe them out. Wow! Mars and the Seven Sisters on Halloween. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#05-43-M

10/24/2005 thru 10/30/2005

"Mars is At Its Biggest, Brightest And Closest
This Halloween Weekend"

Horkheimer: This Halloween weekend Mars is at its biggest, brightest and closest until 2018 and will be the brightest object in the sky after Venus sets. Look east after sunset and its rouge red gold color will dazzle you. Plus you'll be able to watch it travel across the sky all night long. It will be at its highest almost overhead around midnight. It's at its absolute closest to Earth on the 29th between 11:22 and 11:27 p.m. Eastern Time, only 43 million miles away which is a lot closer than it was a year ago when it was 248 million miles away. On Halloween at midnight it will be almost overhead and accompanied by the legendary Seven Sisters. Wow! Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Tuesday 9/20/05 - 1000-1100 Eastern Time 5 Shows

One Hour Feed - 5 Shows

Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.


 

STAR GAZER

Episode #05-44 / 1456th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 10/31/2005 through Sunday 11/6/2005

"Mars Still At Its Brightest; Mercury, Venus And the Moon;
And Saturn Rises Before Midnight"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. In case you've been wondering what that bright red gold object is in the night sky just after Sunset in the east, it's Mars, still at its closest and brightest until 2018. And if that's not enough also in early evening you can see the two planets closest to the Sun, Mercury and Venus which the Moon visits this week. Plus right around midnight when Mars reaches its highest point almost overhead the ringed planet Saturn will have risen just above the horizon. Wow!

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Saturday night November 5th 40 minutes after sunset where the brightest thing you'll see in the night sky is beautiful Venus and parked right next to it an exquisite crescent Moon complete with earthshine which will look like a dark full Moon nestled within the crescent. Don't miss this because it is the kind of naked eye celestial sight that has made people ooh and aah for thousands of years.

Next if you've got a really flat horizon look just above it down to Venus right and you'll see the first planet out from the Sun the tiny pink planet Mercury, always difficult to see because it never gets very high above the horizon but give it your best shot anyway. Then if you turn around and face east an hour after sunset super brilliant Mars shining an incredible ruby gold will have just risen and will travel across the night sky all night long which planets always do when they are at opposition.

You see Mars officially comes into opposition on Monday the 7th which simply means that it is directly opposite the Sun. So common deduction would tell you that if it's directly opposite the Sun we'll be able to see Mars in the sky all the hours that the Sun is not in the sky which means that it will rise in the east as the Sun sets in the west, travel across the sky all night long, reach its highest point around midnight and slowly descend the southwestern sky until it sets in the west at dawn as the Sun rises in the east. And if you have a small telescope and use a high powered eyepiece you'll notice that Mars' south polar ice cap is tilted towards us but that it will appear very small because it is late summer in Mars' southern hemisphere. The most prominent dark marking you'll see on Mars is called Syrtis Major. It looks like a broad triangle and up close with our robot space craft we see that it is actually a huge plateau on Mars. Amateur astrophotographers have been photographing Mars as it's been approaching for the last several months. And some of the pictures will absolutely knock your socks off.

But if Mars isn't enough for you, another planet will have just risen in the east when Mars is overhead at midnight, my favorite planet of them all ringed Saturn. And even the cheapest department store telescope will show you its rings. Wow! What a way to begin November. Venus and the Moon and Mercury, Mars up all night and Saturn reappearing before midnight. Double wow! Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#05-44 M

10/31/2005 thru 11/6/2005

"Mars Still At Its Brightest; Mercury, Venus And the Moon;
And Saturn Rises Before Midnight"

Horkheimer: November opens with a cosmic bang. Mars is still at its brightest until 2018, the Moon visits Venus and Mercury and Saturn rises before midnight. This Saturday an exquisite crescent Moon parks right next to Venus, while Mercury hugs the horizon. On Monday Mars is at opposition, which means it's directly opposite the Sun so it's visible in the sky all night long from sunset to sunrise. It reaches its highest point at midnight almost overhead at which time if you look east you'll also see ringed Saturn has just risen, a treat in even the cheapest telescope. Wow! Saturn and Mars, Mercury and Venus, plus an exquisite crescent Moon. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.

 


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


[SmilinJack]Return to the [STAR GAZER Main Page]