STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Reel # 609 One-hour feed
Wednesday 9/20/06 1000 to 1100/512
Includes episodes 0640, 0641, 0642, 0643, 0644


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 06-40 / 1504th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 10/02/2006 through
Sunday 10/08/2006

"Stars For An Indian Summer"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. This is that time of year when across the middle and northern latitudes of the U.S., a strange and wonderful phenomenon occurs. You see even though the days and nights have been getting chillier and in some places the first frost may have occurred, nevertheless, out of nowhere a few unseasonably warm golden days occur, days called Indian Summer. When I was a kid living in Wisconsin we always looked forward to this last echo of summer, which seemed to be a miniature season out of time and place. Indeed, Indian Summer always seemed like summer's last hurrah, its last attempt to remind everyone of its wonder by sneaking into the cold days of autumn and bidding a final farewell. And just as summer seems to have a difficult time leaving, so too do some of the stars which dominated summer nights. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for any night in early October an hour after sunset your local time. And if you look almost overhead you will see 3 brilliant stars which if we draw lines between them would create a triangle. A triangle traditionally called the Summer Triangle and which strangely, is still very high in the heavens after sunset throughout October. Its brightest star named Vega, belongs to the tiny constellation Lyra the Harp. Its next brightest is Altair in the constellation Aquila the Eagle and the third brightest, Deneb, which marks the tail of Cygnus the Swan. Now although I shouldn't play favorites my favorite is the brightest, Vega, the 5th brightest star we can see from Earth. It glistens a crisp sharp blue white, which tells us that it is a much, much hotter star than out own yellow-orange Sun.Indeed, compared to our Sun's surface temperature of 10,000 degrees Fahrenheit, Vega burns a fierce 17,000 degrees. And whereas our Sun is just a little under 1 million miles in diameter, Vega is almost 3 million miles wide. Indeed, if we could place our Sun and Vega side by side, Vega would be 60 times brighter.

But the thing I really like to think about when I gaze up at Vega on these crisp autumn nights is that our Sun and all its planets, including our Earth, are racing toward Vega at the incredible speed of 12 miles a second, that's over 43,000 miles per hour which means that every year we get almost 400 million miles closer. However even though Vega is only 25 light years away, nevertheless at this speed it would take our Sun almost half a billion years to reach it. Astronomers call this point in space toward which we are rushing "The Apex of the Sun's Way". How lovely. How poetic. So some night this month, perhaps on one of the evenings of Indian Summer, go out just after sunset, look almost overhead, focus on Vega and if you have a vivid imagination, let your spirit soar and you might almost feel our tiny Earth hurtling through space toward this magnificent star and "The Apex of the Sun's Way". What a wonderful venture awaits you these autumn nights if you simply remember to keep looking up!

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#06-40 M

10/02/2006 thru 10/08/2006

"Stars For An Indian Summer"

Horkheimer: Every autumn out of nowhere come a few warm days which we call Indian Summer. And to complement them the three stars known as the Summer Triangle can still be seen in early evening. They are called Vega, Altair and Deneb. And the brightest, Vega, which is 3 times the size of our Sun, is my favorite because our Sun and all its planets, including our Earth, are racing toward it at the incredible speed of 43,000 miles per hour which means that every year we get 400 million miles closer. Even so it would take our Sun almost half a billion years to reach it. But it never will because by that time Vega will have moved out of the way. Enjoy Indian Summer and keep looking up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Reel # 609 One-hour feed
Wednesday 9/20/06 1000 to 1100/512
Includes episodes 0640, 0641, 0642, 0643, 0644


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode #06-41 /1505th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 10/09/2006 through Sunday 10/15/2006

"USE THE MOON TO FIND THE HEART AND
THE TAIL OF LEO THE LION AND
THE RINGED PLANET"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Starting next Monday night, October 16th for four nights in a row you'll be able to use an exquisite waning crescent Moon to locate the prettiest planet in the solar system and the two most famous stars of Leo the Lion. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for next Monday October 16th about an hour before Sunrise facing east where high above the horizon you'll see an exquisite waning, that is steadily shrinking, crescent Moon. And if you're one of those who has a hard time finding the planets and stars well all you have to do is look directly below the Moon and you'll see planet #6, 75,000 mile wide Saturn which is the second largest planet in the solar system next to Jupiter. Although if we cheat a little and count Saturn's rings we discover that Saturn plus its rings is actually exactly two times as wide as 88,000 mile wide Jupiter. Wow!

Now although this sight will look beautiful to the naked eye if you have pair of binoculars it will be even more wonderful. And if you have an inexpensive telescope you'll see Saturn's rings in all their glory. Then if you go out 24 hours later Tuesday night October 17th you'll see that the Moon has gotten a bit skinnier and it has moved past Saturn. And if you look just above it you will see Regulus the brightest star of the ancient royal constellation Leo the Lion. In fact Regulus means king and it marks Leo's heart if you imagine him to be in a reclining position like the Sphinx of ancient Egypt. But if you look at Regulus through a telescope it won't show any more detail than it does to the naked eye. It will only appear brighter and that's because it's so far away.

Indeed while Saturn will be only 900 million miles away next week Regulus will be 460 trillion miles away or as we say 77 light years distant. Plus Regulus is a bit larger than Saturn, in fact even larger than our own Sun being 1.4 million miles wide. Now 24 hours later the Moon will be even lower. Plus if you look down to its left you'll spot Leo's second brightest star, Denebola, which means the lion's tail. It is 1.6 million miles wide and even closer than Regulus, 36 light years distant. So if Denebola is closer and bigger than Regulus why isn't it brighter? Simple, it's not as hot a star as Regulus. Now in case it's cloudy on Wednesday you'll still be able to use the Moon to find Denebola because 24 hours later on Thursday an even skinnier crescent will be down and to the right of Denebola. So use the Moon to find Saturn on Monday, Regulus on Tuesday and Denebola on Wednesday and Thursday. It's fun! Keep looking up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#06-41 M

10/09/2006 thru 10/15/2006

"USE THE MOON TO FIND THE HEART AND
THE TAIL OF LEO THE LION AND
THE RINGED PLANET"

Horkheimer: Next week you'll be able to use the Moon to locate the prettiest planet and the two brightest stars of Leo the Lion. Next Monday before sunrise face east and directly below the Moon you'll see Saturn whose ring system is twice as wide as Jupiter. On Tuesday just above the Moon you'll see Regulus, which marks Leo's heart. And while Saturn is only 900 million miles away next week Regulus will be 460 trillion miles away. On Wednesday the Moon is close to Denebola which marks Leo's tail and even though it is bigger and closer than Regulus nevertheless it's dimmer. Why? Simple. It's not as hot! Find Saturn on Monday, Regulus on Tuesday and Denebola on Wednesday. Keep looking up!


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Reel # 609 One-hour feed
Wednesday 9/20/06 1000 to 1100/512
Includes episodes 0640, 0641, 0642, 0643, 0644


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 06-42 / 1506th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 10/16/2006 through Sunday 10/22/2006

"HALLOWEEN AND THE SEVEN SISTERS
AND THE END OF THE WORLD"


Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers. You know because Halloween greeting cards often depict a witch riding a broom in front of a full moon many people have the mistaken notion that there's a full moon every Halloween when in fact we won't have a full Moon on Halloween again until 2020. But there is something you can see in the night sky every Halloween that has long been associated with traditional days of the dead. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for midnight, any night in late October and early November. And if you look up almost overhead you will see a tiny cluster of stars called the Pleiades, the Seven Sisters. And to many peoples long ago, when the Pleiades reached their highest point at midnight, which happens every year around this time, it was a signal that this was the time of the year to honor the dead. Now astronomically speaking, whenever the Seven Sisters reach their highest point in the heavens, we call this their culmination. And whenever the Pleiades culminated at midnight many ancient cultures around the world held great ceremonies in honor of the occasion.

The 19th century astronomer W.T. Olcott wrote that these widespread memorial services often commemorated a great cataclysm that supposedly occurred in even more ancient times when the Pleiades culminated at midnight. In fact many speculated that this great cataclysm might have been either the Great Flood of the Bible or perhaps the 10 Plagues of Egypt or even the legendary Sinking of Atlantis. Indeed, this belief was so popular that even Chaucer and Milton called the Pleiades the Seven Atlantic Sisters.

In fact, the belief that a great cataclysm had occurred when the Pleiades culminated at midnight was so widespread that even the ancient Aztec and Maya conducted spectacular ceremonies every year when the Pleiades culminated at midnight because they believed that the world would come to an end on one of these Pleiades overhead at midnight nights. In fact they were convinced that the world had already been destroyed and recreated 4 times when the Pleiades culminated at midnight. Indeed the belief was so widespread that in Mexico the pyramid of the sun in Teotihuacan was oriented to the setting of the Pleiades as were all of the city's west running streets. And in ancient Greece several temples were lined up with the rising and setting of the Seven Sisters.

Now although the Pleiades no longer culminate at midnight on the same nights as they did in ancient times, nevertheless, you can still see them almost overhead and almost at their highest every Halloween at midnight as a modern reminder that long ago the Pleiades signaled not only the night of the dead, but to some even the end of the world itself. So, should they perhaps be renamed the Seven Sinister Sisters? Whatever, look for them yourself this Halloween and every Halloween at midnight. It's easy and it makes any Halloween just a little bit spookier. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.

 


 

Star Gazer Minute

#06-42 M

10/16/2006 thru 10/22/2006

"HALLOWEEN AND THE SEVEN SISTERS
AND THE END OF THE WORLD"

Horkheimer: Although we often associate Halloween with the full Moon many cultures celebrating a day of the dead at this time of year attached more importance to The Pleiades, the Seven Sisters, which are almost overhead at midnight every Halloween. Many peoples believed that a great ancient cataclysm occurred when the Pleiades were overhead at midnight, such as the Great Biblical Flood and the Sinking of Atlantis. The Aztec and Maya not only believed that the world would come to an end on one of these "Pleiades overhead at midnight nights" but were convinced that the world had already been destroyed and recreated four times on such a night. So should we rename them the Seven Sinister Sisters? Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Reel # 609 One-hour feed
Wednesday 9/20/06 1000 to 1100/512
Includes episodes 0640, 0641, 0642, 0643, 0644


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 06-43 / 1507th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 10/23/2006 through Sunday 10/29/2006

"The Biggest Planet Dazzles And
The Smallest Planet Takes A Journey
Across The Face Of The Sun"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. And as you may know October has not been a good month for planet hunters. In fact Mars and Venus are hidden in the glare of the Sun and Saturn doesn't rise until after midnight which leaves us with only two naked eye planets, Jupiter the largest and Mercury once again the smallest since Pluto got reclassified. But Jupiter's still dazzling just after sunset and Mercury is getting ready to put on a rare show, which you'll be able to see. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this week and next about half an hour after sunset facing southwest and if you've got a clear unobstructed horizon you'll be able to see Jupiter hovering above it. To the naked eye it will appear very bright and through even the smallest telescope you'll see several bands of its atmospheric storms and its four largest moons which will change position night after night as they constantly shuttle back and forth in orbit about the planet. Jupiter is eleven times wider than our 8,000 mile wide Earth, 88,000 miles wide which means we could line up 11 Earths side by side across its middle, so huge we could fit over 1300 Earths inside it! And for the next couple of weeks it will be approximately 900 million miles away from us.

Now directly below it even closer to the horizon you'll see the first planet out from the Sun which next week will be only 65 million miles away. But even though it's closer than Jupiter it's much dimmer because it's so much smaller, a mere 3,000 miles wide, which means we could line up almost 30 Mercurys across Jupiter's middle. Wow!

Now even though it pales in size and significance with Jupiter nevertheless it can do a trick that Jupiter can never do. In fact only the two planets closer to the Sun than our Earth, Mercury and Venus, can perform what we call a solar transit which simply means that they can pass directly across the face of the Sun as seen from Earth. Now the last time Mercury transited, that is passed across the face of the Sun so we could see it from Earth was May 7th , 2003. But ta da! Only two weeks from now on wed. Nov. 8th practically everyone in North and South America will be able to watch part or all of this Mercury/Sun-transit trek before sunset.

First use Jupiter to find Mercury over the next few nights and then go to our website, jackstargazer.com, for instructions on how to observe this event safely through special solar filters mounted on small telescopes because under no circumstances should you observe this event with the naked eye! You absolutely have to have protection to prevent blindness! But if you miss it because it's rained out or cloudy, don't worry, it will happen again on May 9th, 2016. Keep looking up!


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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#06-43 M

10/23/2006 thru 10/29/2006

"The Biggest Planet Dazzles And
The Smallest Planet Takes A Journey
Across The Face Of The Sun"

Horkheimer: The biggest planet is still dazzling and the smallest planet is getting ready to perform a trick. An hour after sunset face southwest and you'll see Jupiter, so huge we could line 11 earths up across its middle. Directly below it you'll see tiny Mercury, so small we could line 30 mercurys across jupiter's middle. On Nov. 8th Mercury will perform a solar transit, which simply means that it will pass directly across the face of the Sun amd you'll be able to see it. Go to our website for safety instructions because you must not watch this event without proper eye protection! Don't miss this because it won't happen again until 2016. So keep looking up!
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Reel # 609 One-hour feed
Wednesday 9/20/06 1000 to 1100/512
Includes episodes 0640, 0641, 0642, 0643, 0644


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 06-44 / 1508th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 10/30/2006 through Sunday 11/05/2006

"Looking Back In Time 30, 40 and
2 1/2 Million Years Ago"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow Star Gazers. You know everyone is fascinated with the concept of time travel. And although actually going back in time is only a thing of science fiction you can actually look back in time and see things as they existed long ago. So in this very special edition of Star Gazer let me show you how to see some things as they actually existed 30 years ago, 40 years ago and 2 1/2 million years ago and explain why I've chosen them.

Now most of you know that light is considered to be the fastest moving thing in the universe. In fact it travels 186,000 miles a second which means that whenever we look at the Moon we never see it as it exists at the moment but as it existed 1 1/3 seconds ago because it is about 240,000 miles away. When we look at the Sun we also never see it as it actually exists at the present moment but as it existed 8 1/3 minutes ago because it is 93 million miles away. And the closest star to the sun, Proxima Centauri, is so far away that we see it as it existed 4 1/4 years ago. Well believe it or not this Saturday November 4th marks the 30th anniversary of Star Gazer.

So to help celebrate I decided I'd like to find some visible star 30 light years away so we can look at something this week as it actually appeared when Star Gazer first went on the air. And happily our co-producer of 30 years Bill Dishong found one. It's to the right of Orion the Hunter in the constellation Eridanus the River. Its name is Rana and when we look at it this week we are seeing it as it actually existed when Star Gazer began telecasting. I also wanted to find a star that was 40 light years away because just by coincidence the base of my operations, the Space Transit Planetarium at the Miami Science Museum, opened its doors 40 years ago also this Saturday November 4th. So Bill went to work again and found a star 40 light years away, a star named Porrima in Virgo the Virgin. So when we look at Porrima this week we are seeing it as it actually existed when the Miami star factory opened 40 years ago.

All of which leads to a question. If whenever we look at the stars we are actually looking back in time depending upon how far away a star is, just how far back in time can we see with the naked eye? Well this is a good month to find out because if you go out any clear moonless night in November between 8 and 10 p.m. draw a line from the brightest star of Cassiopeia to the brightest star in the great square of Pegasus, and 2/3rds of the way up that line you'll see a tiny faint cloud which through telescopes reveals itself to be a gigantic family of billions of stars. It's called M-31, the Great Galaxy in Andromeda. And it is so far away it takes 2 1/2 million years for its light to reach us. So we see it now as it existed 2 1/2 million years ago. Wow!

So here's to you M-31, happy 40th, Miami Planetarium and thank you for inviting me into your homes these past three decades. Keep looking up!


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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#06-44 M

10/30/2006 thru 11/05/2006

"Looking Back In Time 30, 40 and
2 1/2 Million Years Ago"

Horkheimer: Whenever we look at the stars we never see them as they exist now but as they existed some time in the past depending on how far away they are. Since this Saturday November 4th is the 30th Anniversary of Star Gazer we decided to see if we could find a star whose light left it when Star Gazer began in 1976. We found one and to see it face south at midnight and to the right of Orion the Hunter in the faint constellation Eridanus is a star named Rana. And when we look at it this week we are actually seeing the light that left it when this show was first telecast 30 years ago. Thank you for letting me come into your home for the past 3 decades and may I remind you once again to keep looking up!


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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


[SmilinJack]Return to the [STAR GAZER Main Page]