STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Tuesday 9/20/07 1100 to 1200
Includes episodes 0740, 0741, 0742, 0743, 0744


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 07-40 / 1556th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 10/01/2007 through
Sunday 10/07/2007

"The Moon Visits An Exquisite Cosmic Trio This Weekend"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. And have we ever got a weekend for you because this Saturday and Sunday just before dawn three cosmic objects will make a lovely triangle and will be visited by an exquisite waning crescent Moon. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Saturday October 6th, one hour before sunrise facing east where you will see a crescent 25 day old Moon complete with earthshine which will look like a dark grayish black full Moon nestled within the crescent hovering above a triangle of three cosmic objects, two of which are in our solar system and one of which is in the great beyond. The brightest object in the triangle is the brightest cosmic object we can see other than the Sun and our Moon and is frequently mistaken for a UFO or a landing light on an airplane. It is the second closest cosmic object to our Earth other than the Moon and almost the same size as our planet Earth, 8,000 mile wide Venus. The second object in our triangle is likewise a planet although much bigger, 75,000 mile wide Saturn, which is everyone's favorite as seen through a small telescope. The third component of our triangle however, blows both Saturn and Venus away in size because it is a star. It's called Regulus and it marks the heart of the sphinx-like Leo the Lion. It is so huge in fact that it is four 1/2 times wider than our own local star the Sun, which is almost a million miles wide. Wow!

Don't miss this exquisite triangle with the Moon hovering up above it this Saturday please. But if you do, believe it or not, it actually gets better 24 hours later. Because on Sunday morning the 7th an even skinnier crescent Moon complete with earthshine will be parked right next to Saturn. And this is a sight you really don't want to miss! Four cosmic objects all clustered together before dawn. But remember appearances can be deceiving because even though these four objects look like they're huddled close together nothing could be farther from the truth. Now one of the most fascinating ways we can measure the distances to cosmic objects is by using the speed of light. Since light travels at a speed of 186,000 miles per second, this weekend the Moon will be only 245,000 miles away so it will take only 1 1/3 seconds for its light to reach us. Venus on the other hand is so much farther away that it will take its light nearly 4 1/2 minutes to reach us. And Saturn is so much farther away than either Venus or the Moon it will take its light one and a half hours to reach us this weekend.

Even so Saturn Venus and the Moon are cosmically speaking only a hop, skip and a jump away because Regulus is so incredibly far from Earth that it takes its light 78 years to reach us which means that when we look at Regulus this weekend we'll be seeing the light that left it in 1929, the year of the great stock market crash. So get thee out this Saturday to see the Moon approaching our cosmic triangle and on Sunday see it nestled within it. Is this gonna be a great weekend or what? Keep looking up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#07-40 M

10/01/2007 thru 10/07/2007

"The Moon Visits An Exquisite Cosmic Trio This Weekend"

Horkheimer: This weekend the Moon will visit an exquisite cosmic triangle. On Saturday the 6th an hour before sunrise face east and a lovely crescent Moon will be parked right above 8,000 mile wide Venus, 75,000 mile wide Saturn and Leo's 4 million mile wide heart star, Regulus. But 24 hours later it's even better because on Sunday an even skinnier crescent Moon will be parked right inside the triangle. The Moon is so close this weekend that it takes its light only 1 1/3 seconds to reach us, but it takes 78 years for light to reach us from Regulus which means we see the light that left it in 1929 the year of the great stock market crash. Happy Moon and triangle watching and keep looking up.

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Tuesday 9/20/07 1100 to 1200
Includes episodes 0740, 0741, 0742, 0743, 0744


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.




STAR GAZER

Episode #07-41 /1557th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 10/08/2007 through Sunday 10/14/2007

"The Moon Meets The King Of The Planets
And An Emperor Star"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. I'd like you to mark three nights on your calendar as the nights to watch the Moon as it visits the biggest planet and a super big star. Sunday October 14th, Monday the 15th and Tuesday the 16th.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Sunday evening just after dark facing southwest. And if you have a really clear unobstructed horizon you'll see an absolutely beautiful three day old crescent Moon complete with earthshine which will look like a dark blackish gray full Moon nestled within the crescent and which according to folk myth is often called "The Old Moon In The New Moon's Arms". Then if you draw an imaginary line up and to its left, along that line you'll see two bright objects which the Moon will visit the next two nights.

The first is a reddish light and it is one of the biggest stars we can see with the naked eye. And I suggest you see it now because it will soon disappear from evening skies for quite awhile. Its name is Antares and it marks the heart of Scorpius the Scorpion which is just getting ready to set below the southwest horizon. Directly above it and much, much brighter the biggest of our solar system's planets, Jupiter the king. Now although they'll be lined up in kind of a row this Sunday night, 24 hours later on Monday the Moon will have moved up and past Antares to its left and will be just a little bit fatter as a four day old Moon and will make a lovely triangle with Antares and Jupiter.

So if you're lousy at finding stars and planets use the Moon on Sunday as well as Monday to find Jupiter and Antares. Then 24 hours later the triangle will have opened up and be much wider and a five day old Moon only two days away from first quarter will be parked off to Jupiter's left and just to the right of the teapot shaped portion of stars of Sagittarius.

Once again, this Sunday a very skinny crescent Moon is below Antares and on a line with it and Jupiter, on Monday it is just past Antares and below Jupiter and makes an exquisite triangle with them and on Tuesday makes an even wider triangle when it is parked between Jupiter and Sagittarius' teapot. And now for the super mind blowing goodie part. Although the Moon looks like the biggest and brightest object this weekend, it is not. In fact it is only a 2,000 mile wide sphere and so close to us it takes its light only 1 1/3 seconds to reach us. Jupiter the second seemingly brightest object is 88,000 miles wide, so huge we could fit over 300 million of our Moons inside it. But it is so far away we see the light that left it 47 minutes ago. Antares however is the mind blower because it is 600 million miles wide, so huge we could fit 2 1/2 trillion Jupiters or 719 quadrillion Moons inside it. And it is so far away it takes its light 600 years to reach us. Wow!

So get thee outside to do some Moon, Jupiter and Antares watching, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday. Just keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#07-41 M

10/08/2007 thru 10/14/2007

"The Moon Meets The King Of The Planets
And An Emperor Star"

Horkheimer: For three nights you can watch the Moon visit the king of the planets and an emperor of a star. Sunday the 14th just after dark face southwest and you'll see a three day old crescent Moon. And on a line with it Antares, the heart star of the Scorpion and Jupiter. On Monday the Moon will form a triangle with Jupiter and Antares and on Tuesday a much bigger triangle. And think about this. While our Moon is only 2,000 miles wide, Jupiter is 88,000 miles wide so huge we could fit over 300 million Moons inside it. But Antares is a whopping 600 million miles wide, so huge we could fit 2 1/2 trillion Jupiters inside it. Wow! Sunday, Monday, Tuesday. Keep looking up!


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Tuesday 9/20/07 1100 to 1200
Includes episodes 0740, 0741, 0742, 0743, 0744


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 07-42 / 1558th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 10/15/2007 through Sunday 10/21/2007

"Next week's Hunter's Moon Is The Closest, Biggest And Brightest Full Moon Of The Year"

Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers. As you regular viewers know my two favorite full Moons of the year are usually the full Moon of September, the Harvest Moon and the full Moon of October, the Hunter's Moon because they always remind me of giant golden jack-o-lantern pumpkins as they rise and set. But this year's Hunter's Moon, which occurs next Thursday and Friday nights will be even bigger and brighter than usual because it will be the closest full Moon of the year. Plus a few days later you'll be able to use the waning Moon as a Mars finder. Let me show you.

Ok, we've got our sky set up for next Thursday evening, oct. 25th, just after dark facing east where just above the horizon you will see a big, just risen pumpkin colored full Moon. And although you frequently hear me say that the Moon is roughly speaking 240,000 miles away next Thursday night it will be much closer, less than 222,000 miles away which is 30,000 miles closer than the farthest full Moon of the year which occurred on April 2nd when it was over 252,000 miles away. And you can see the difference! In fact next week's full Moon will look almost 14% larger than April's full Moon and will be almost 40% brighter. Wow! And in case you miss it on Thursday night well it will still be almost as close when it rises just after sunset on Friday night, which really gives us two nights of the Hunter's Moon this year. Are we in luck or what!

But do you know why this full Moon is called the Hunter's Moon? Well traditionally this is the first full Moon after the Harvest Moon and since the fields were harvested one month earlier, hunters could ride out after sunset through the harvested fields by the light of this Moon and catch small animals that had come out to glean the fields. So don't miss next Thursday and Friday night's super close, super big, super colorful, super romantic Hunter's Moon.

And for a bonus if you go out Monday night October the 29th around 10 p.m. and look east you will see an exquisite 19 day old waning Moon right above a brilliant rouge gold light which is the planet that is racing towards us and getting brighter every week, and is in fact now one of the brightest objects in the sky, our good old friend Mars which during the 3rd week of December will be at its closest and brightest in two years and on Christmas Eve will reach opposition. So start watching Mars as it gets steadily brighter now. And find it by using the Moon as a finder Monday October 29th. If however it's clouded out on the 29th go out Tuesday night the 30th and an even skinnier 20 day old Moon will be parked right underneath Mars. So there you have it. You can use the waning Moon to find Mars on Monday the 29th and Tuesday the 30th. Plus on Thursday and Friday the 25th and 26th you' see the biggest full Moon of the entire year. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.

 


Star Gazer Minute

#07-42 M

10/15/2007 thru 10/21/2007

 

"Next Week's Hunter's Moon Is The Closest, Biggest And Brightest Full Moon Of The Year"

Horkheimer: Next week's Hunter's Moon will be the closest, biggest and brightest full Moon of the year. On Thursday the 25th just after dark face east and you will see the just risen pumpkin colored full Moon super close, super big and super bright. It will be only 222,000 miles away which is 30,000 miles closer than the farthest full Moon, which occurred on April 2nd. In fact it will look 14% larger and almost 40% brighter. It's called the Hunter's Moon because it is the first full Moon after the Harvest Moon when traditionally hunters would ride through the harvested fields and hunt small animals under the light of this full Moon. If you miss it on Thursday you can see it again on Friday. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Tuesday 9/20/07 1100 to 1200
Includes episodes 0740, 0741, 0742, 0743, 0744


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 07-43 / 1559th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 10/22/2007 through Sunday 10/28/2007

"Celebrate Halloween With The Seven Sinister Sisters"


Horkheimer: Greetings greetings, fellow star gazers. Because Halloween greeting cards often depict a witch riding a broom in front of a full Moon many people have the mistaken notion that there's a full Moon every year at Halloween when in fact we won't have a full Moon on Halloween again until 2020. But there is something you can see in the night sky every Halloween that is even niftier than the Moon to my way of thinking, the Seven Sinister Sisters. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for the witching hour of midnight, any Halloween facing south. And if you look up almost overhead you will see the tiny cluster of stars called The Pleiades, or the Seven Sisters. And to several cultures long ago, when the Seven Sisters reached their highest point at midnight, which happens every year at the end of October and beginning of November, this was a sort of cosmic signal telling people that now was the time of the year to honor the dead. Now astronomically speaking, whenever any object reaches its highest point in the heavens we say that it has culminated.

And whenever The Pleiades culminated at midnight many ancient cultures held great ceremonies in honor of the dead, which is basically where our Halloween comes from. There was also a popular belief that great natural catastrophes had occurred on some of the nights when The Pleiades culminated at midnight. In fact some legends claim that the Great Flood and the 10 Plagues of Egypt, even the legendary sinking of Atlantis, occurred when The Pleiades culminated at midnight. Indeed, this belief was so widespread that the ancient Aztec and Maya conducted spectacular ceremonies when The Pleiades culminated at midnight because they believed that the world had already been destroyed and recreated not once but 4 times when the Seven Sisters were overhead at midnight. Even the Pyramid of the Sun in Teotihuacan, Mexico was oriented to the setting of The Pleiades as were all of the city's west facing streets. And coincidentally many ancient Greek temples were also lined up with the setting or the rising of the Seven Sisters.

Now although The Pleiades no longer reach their highest point, that is culminate, exactly at midnight on the same nights as they did in ancient times, nevertheless, they are still almost at their highest every Halloween at midnight as a modern reminder that our ancestors were deeply moved and affected by the cosmos and used many cosmic coincidences to determine important religious and ceremonial events in their life. In fact some people still believe that the next time the world ends it will also happen on a Pleiades overhead at midnight night. But I wouldn't hold my breath if I were you.

Instead if you're out this Halloween or any Halloween at midnight look almost overhead for the beautiful cluster of stars some people have seen as the Seven Sinister Sisters and remind yourself that these same stars have been seen by thousands of generations who have gone before us. Now doesn't that make Halloween at midnight even better than a full Moon? Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#07-43 M

10/22/2007 thru 10/28/2007

"Celebrate Halloween With The Seven Sinister Sisters"

Horkheimer: Although we often associate Halloween with the full Moon many cultures celebrating a day of the dead at this time of year attached more importance to The Pleiades, the Seven Sisters, which are almost overhead at midnight every Halloween. Some legends claim that a great ancient cataclysm occurred when The Pleiades were overhead at midnight, such as the Great Flood and the sinking of Atlantis. And the Aztec and Maya believed that the world had been destroyed and created four times on such a night and would once again come to an end when The Pleiades were overhead at midnight. Which is where you'll find them this Halloween. So should we rename them the Seven Sinister Sisters? Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer



STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

One hour feed
Tuesday 9/20/07 1100 to 1200
Includes episodes 0740, 0741, 0742, 0743, 0744


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 07-44 / 1560th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 10/29/2007 through Sunday 11/04/2007

"The Moon Visits Three Morning Planets
And Two Lovely Stars"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Starting this weekend you can watch a beautiful waning Moon as it pays a visit to three morning planets and two stars just before Sunrise. So if you've ever had trouble finding stars and planets now is the time to use the Moon to find them. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Saturday November 3rd, one hour before Sunrise, and if you look east you will see an exquisite 24 day old crescent Moon complete with earthshine which will look like a blackish-grey, full Moon nestled within the crescent, parked right next to the bright star Regulus which marks the heart of Leo the Lion. And in fact in some places, particularly the southwest USA, the Moon will actually occult Regulus, that is it will pass over it and hide it briefly from view. So this Saturday you'll be able to find Regulus with no problem because the Moon will be visually practically slamming right into it.

Look just below the Moon and you'll see another bright light, which is planet #6 from the Sun, our old friend the ringed planet Saturn which just begs to be seen through a small telescope. Now since the Moon moves approximately 13 degrees every 24 hours and since one degree is the width of two full Moons this means that 24 hours later the Moon will have moved 26 full Moon widths closer to the horizon. And because the Moon is waning, that is shrinking, you'll be able to see a 25 day old Moon on Sunday almost the same distance below Saturn as it was above it on Saturday. So that's a pretty easy way to find Saturn.

Also on Sunday if you look below the Moon you will see planet #2, dazzling, breathtakingly brilliant, Venus also about 13 degrees below the Moon. And remember since the Moon moves approximately 13 degrees each day, this means that the Moon should be very close to Venus 24 hours later. Indeed on Monday November 5th a 26 day old Moon complete with earthshine will be parked very close to Venus. So on Saturday we saw the Moon parked next to Regulus and above Saturn and on Sunday parked below Saturn.

On Monday very close to Venus and continuing to get skinnier and skinnier every day. And now here's the tricky part. If you have a clear flat horizon you will be able to see two other objects, planet #1 out from the Sun, tiny Mercury and the brightest star of Virgo the Virgin, Spica. And 24 hours later a 27 day old Moon will be well past Venus and on its journey to visit Mercury and Spica. And if you can still see the slender sliver of the 28 day old Moon on Wednesday Nov. 7th it will be hovering just above the two. So there you have it an easy way to find stars and planets by using the Moon: Saturday, the Moon and Regulus; Sunday, the Moon just past Saturn; Monday, the Moon next to Venus; Tuesday, on its way to visit Mercury and Spica and, ta da!, on Wednesday, just above them. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#07-44 M

10/29/2007 thru 11/04/2007

"The Moon Visits Three Morning Planets
And Two Lovely Stars"

Horkheimer: You can use the Moon to find three morning planets and two stars. This Saturday one hour before sunrise look east and the waning Moon will be parked right next to Regulus the heart star of Leo the Lion. On Sunday the Moon will be just below ringed Saturn and on Monday right next to Venus the brightest planet. On Tuesday an even skinnier Moon is on its way to visit planet Mercury and the brightest star of Virgo, Spica. And with luck on Wednesday as skinny a Moon as you'll ever see will be parked right above them. Once again Saturday the Moon and Regulus, Sunday the Moon and Saturn , Monday the Moon and Venus and Wednesday the Moon above Mercury and Spica. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer

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