STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

Reel # 608 30-minute feed
Friday 8/18/06 1030 to 1100/512
Includes episodes 0636, 0637, 0638, 0639


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 06-36 / 1500th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 9/04/2006 through
Sunday 9/10/2006

"The 1500th Episode Of Star Gazer And
The Return Of The False Dawn Of Omar Khayyam"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings, fellow star gazers. And would you believe this show marks the 1500th episode of Star Gazer. But more importantly it also marks the return of what the Persian poet Omar Khayyam called the mysterious 'false dawn', which can only be seen at a certain time of year. And although no one knew what this 'false dawn' was when Khayyam wrote his famous Rubaiyat almost 1000 years ago, we today know its true nature which is absolutely wonderful. Let me tell you all about it and show you how to find it.

O.K., if we could go way out in space and look down on our solar system with superhuman vision, we would notice a faint, almost imperceptible vast cloud extending outward from the Sun in the plane of the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth and slightly beyond, an enormous cloud of cosmic dust. And while one would expect it would be impossible to see this super faint cloud from earth, nevertheless in September when the plane of our Earth's orbit is almost vertical to the horizon, we can. And we now know it is the 'false dawn' Omar Khayyam wrote about.

Now although the best time to see this 'false dawn' is every September, to see it, you absolutely must be far away from city lights when there is no moonlight to hide its faint glow. If you can see the Milky Way from where you live, then you'll also have a good chance of seeing this rare phenomenon. Look for this 'false dawn' in the east 2 hours before sunrise, before the real dawn. It will look like a wedge or cone-shaped dim patch of light about the same brightness as the Milky Way and it will extend from the horizon almost half way up to the zenith about 40 degrees ... An ethereal faintly glowing rounded pyramid of light.

Now the scientific name of this phenomenon is the zodiacal light and it's caused by sunlight scattered off of all those trillions and trillions of dust particles in that great cosmic cloud, which extends from the sun to our Earth. Now the best time to see the 'false dawn', this year is when there is no Moonlight whatsoever in the hours before sunrise, which this year is the last week of September beginning at the time of the new Moon on the 22nd. So mark the last week of this month as the time to get far away from city lights to see the celestial phenomenon, which captured the imagination of an ancient poet. I admit that it is quite elusive and difficult to find in this 21st century because you have to get really far away from all city lights, which for urban dwellers frequently requires a long drive out in the country. But once you've found it I think you'll know why it appeared in poetry centuries before it appeared in scientific writings. And if you want to pay Omar Khayyam a bit of homage on your journey to find his false dawn you just might want to take along" a jug of wine, a loaf of bread and thou beside me singing in the wilderness." Keep Looking Up!

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings, fellow star gazers. And would you believe this show marks the 1500th episode of Star Gazer. But more importantly it also marks the return of what the Persian poet Omar Khayyam called the mysterious 'false dawn', which can only be seen at a certain time of year. And although no one knew what this 'false dawn' was when Khayyam wrote his famous Rubaiyat almost 1000 years ago, we today know its true nature which is absolutely wonderful. Let me tell you all about it and show you how to find it.

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#06-36 M

9/04/2006 thru 9/10/2006

 

"The 1500th Episode Of Star Gazer And
The Return Of The False Dawn Of Omar Khayyam"


Horkheimer: This show marks the 1500th episode of Star Gazer and the return of the mysterious false dawn which Omar Khayyam wrote about almost 1000 years ago. To find this false dawn look east about 2 hours before sunrise the last week of this month for a very dim cone shaped patch of light extending from the horizon almost half way to the zenith. This false dawn is caused by sunlight scattering off of trillions of dust particles in a cosmic cloud, which extends all the way from the Sun to our Earth. Astronomers call it the zodiacal light but you must be far from city lights to see this wonder, which inspired an ancient poet. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

Reel # 608 30-minute feed
Friday 8/18/06 1030 to 1100/512
Includes episodes 0636, 0637, 0638, 0639


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



 

NEW FOR STAR GAZER!
"Star Gazer" is now available for
Video Podcasting as well as RealPlayer streaming video.

 Click Here  Click Here

STAR GAZER

Episode #06-37 /1501st Show
To Be Aired : Monday 9/11/2006 through Sunday 9/17/2006

"Get Up With The Chickens And Use The Moon To
Find Two Planets And A Star"

 

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. At least once a month the Moon passes close enough to an important planet or a famous star so that you can use it as a planet and star finder. And such is the case next week when you'll be able to use the Moon four days in a row to find not just one planet but two of them plus a very famous bright star. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for next Monday September 18th about 40 minutes before Sunrise when it's starting to get light out facing due east. And if you have a clear flat horizon you'll see a super bright light which is planet #2, 8,000 mile wide Venus. Then if you draw an imaginary line up and leaning to the right it will pass very close to two medium bright lights. The first one is Regulus the star which marks the heart of the ancient constellation Leo the Lion. And directly above it planet #6 from the Sun, 75,000 mile wide ringed planet Saturn which we've been visiting for the past two years with the Cassini space craft, and which just a few weeks ago discovered a chain of about a dozen lakes ranging in size from 6 to 62 miles wide, but lakes filled not with water like on Earth but lakes containing a mixture of liquid methane and ethane. Wow! Now although Saturn and Titan are almost a billion miles away nevertheless you can actually see Titan through a small telescope because it is so huge. In fact it is over 400 miles wider than the planet Mercury. Double wow!

Next look directly above Saturn and you'll see an exquisite waning, which means shrinking, crescent Moon complete with earthshine, which looks like a black full Moon, nestled within the crescent. Which is one of my personal favorite kind of Moons. Now in case you're not sure you've found Saturn or Regulus, the next day on Tuesday the 19th an even skinnier crescent with earthshine will be parked directly between Saturn and Regulus which will make them super easy to find. Then 24 hours later on Wednesday the 20th an even skinnier crescent will be parked not quite half way between Regulus and Venus. But one of the niftiest days for viewing and most challenging to see will be on Thursday the 21st when a slim-as-it-ever-gets crescent Moon will be almost visually on top of Venus. To see it you'll have to have a super clear, super flat horizon and you should look about 30 to 35 minutes before Sunrise, not 40 minutes. So once again, using the Moon as a finder, on Monday the 18th the Moon is parked right above Saturn, on Tuesday the 19th it's parked between Saturn and Regulus. On Wednesday the 20th a much skinnier Moon is parked almost half way between Regulus and brilliant Venus and ta da! on Thursday the 21st Venus and the Moon make an exquisite duo that will take your breath away. And in fact if you have a pair of binoculars handy the two of them together will be absolutely magnificent! So next week get up with the chickens and find two wonderful planets and a lovely star. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


 

NEW FOR STAR GAZER!
"Star Gazer" is now available for
Video Podcasting as well as RealPlayer streaming video.

 Click Here  Click Here

Star Gazer Minute

#06-37 M

9/11/2006 thru 9/17/2006

"Get Up With The Chickens And Use The Moon To
Find Two Planets And A Star"


Horkheimer: Next week you can use the Moon to find two planets and a famous star. Monday just before sunrise face east and an exquisite crescent Moon will be right above Saturn. On Tuesday it will be parked between Saturn and Regulus the heart star of Leo the Lion. On Wednesday it will be almost halfway between Regulus and super bright Venus. And on Thursday Venus and the Moon will be so close they will take your breath away. Use a pair of binoculars to see the Moon and Venus. And aim a small telescope at Saturn and you'll see its moon Titan, on which we recently discovered a chain of lakes filled with liquid methane and ethane. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, keep looking up!

Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

Reel # 608 30-minute feed
Friday 8/18/06 1030 to 1100/512
Includes episodes 0636, 0637, 0638, 0639


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



NEW FOR STAR GAZER!
"Star Gazer" is now available for
Video Podcasting as well as RealPlayer streaming video.

 Click Here  Click Here

STAR GAZER

Episode # 06-38 / 1502nd Show

To Be Aired : Monday 9/18/2006 through Sunday 9/24/2006

"How To Find The Only Planet Visible In
Evening Skies Using The Crescent Moon"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Like that old cliché, feast or famine, right now instead of having a feast of planets in evening skies as we did a few months ago, it's now a famine because there is only one planet left for you to see in early evening. But it's a good one because it's the biggest and very bright. And next Monday and Tuesday an exquisite Moon will appear underneath it providing us with two evenings of a lovely celestial duo. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for next Monday September 25th about 45 minutes after sunset facing west and if you have a really clear flat horizon you will see an exquisite 3 day old waxing, which means growing, crescent Moon complete with Earthshine, which looks like a black full Moon nestled within the crescent. And just up and a little to the left of this slender sliver of a Moon will be the brilliant king of the planets itself, Jupiter. But in case it's cloudy on Monday or you don't have a clear flat horizon then go out 24 hours later on Tuesday the 26th and a slightly fatter crescent will be on the other side of Jupiter down to its left and will make an even more beautiful duo in my estimation. Once again Monday the 25th and Tuesday the 26th.

Now even though all you need to see this beautiful sight is just your naked eye you'll be amazed at what a pair of binoculars will show you. Even the Moon through the cheapest pair of binoculars is very dramatic especially when it's just a crescent. And Jupiter will take your breath away because you'll see some tiny pinpoints of light on either side of it which in reality are the four largest of Jupiter's 63 known moons. Plus if you go out night after night you will notice that these four moons constantly change their position relative to Jupiter and each other. And that's because they're in orbit about the king. These four largest moons, in order out from Jupiter, are Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. And Io, Ganymede and Callisto are each larger than our own Moon and Ganymede is actually larger than the planet Mercury.

Now through even the cheapest small telescope you'll be able to see a lot of features on Jupiter, many of which will look like bands, which encircle it. These bands are different zones of storms in Jupiter's atmosphere and with a really good telescope you'll be able to see the giant Red Spot, which is a humongous hurricane-like storm which we've seen on Jupiter for over 300 years and which is much larger than our planet Earth. In fact Earth is a mere 8,000 miles wide compared to Jupiter's 88,000 mile wide diameter. Which means we could line 11 Earths up side by side across its middle and we could fit over 1300 Earth's inside of it. Wow! So get thee out next Monday and Tuesday for two exquisite views of a waxing Moon and the king of the planets. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.

 


 

NEW FOR STAR GAZER!
"Star Gazer" is now available for
Video Podcasting as well as RealPlayer streaming video.

 Click Here  Click Here

Star Gazer Minute

#06-38 M

9/18/2006 thru 9/24/2006

"How To Find The Only Planet Visible In
Evening Skies Using The Crescent Moon"

Horkheimer:

Next Monday and Tuesday the king of the planets will pair up with an exquisite crescent Moon. Monday about 45 minutes after sunset face west and you'll see a slender sliver of a crescent Moon and just above it giant Jupiter. On Tuesday the Moon will be on the other side of Jupiter and will make yet another beautiful picture. And with just a pair of binoculars you can see tiny pinpoints of light, which are the four largest of Jupiter's 63 known moons. Three are larger than out own Moon and one is larger than the planet Mercury. 88,000 mile wide Jupiter is so big we could line 11 Earths up across its middle and fit 1300 Earths inside it. Wow! Keep Looking Up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

Reel # 608 30-minute feed
Friday 8/18/06 1030 to 1100/512
Includes episodes 0636, 0637, 0638, 0639


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov



Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



 

NEW FOR STAR GAZER!
"Star Gazer" is now available for
Video Podcasting as well as RealPlayer streaming video.

 Click Here  Click Here

STAR GAZER

Episode # 06-39 / 1503rd Show

To Be Aired : Monday 9/25/2006 through Sunday 10/01/2006

"Autumn's Great Cosmic Square Replaces
Summer's Great Cosmic Triangle"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and as I've often reminded you, when ever the seasons change on Earth, so too do the stars change overhead, thus the phrase "the stars of the season". Now that phrase 'stars of the season' usually refers to the major stars and star groups that reach their highest position above the horizon in mid-evening, so because autumn began last Saturday the 23rd we should already see a change in the stars overhead. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for any night during the first two weeks of October around 10 p.m. Daylight Time and if you look just west of overhead you will see the 3 bright stars which make up the points of the Summer Triangle, the brightest being Vega in the constellation Lyra the Harp, the second brightest, Altair in Aquila the Eagle, the third brightest, Deneb in Cygnus the Swan. Now during the first week of summer, at the end of June, the Summer Triangle was just rising in the east at 10 p.m. But if you went out at 10 p.m. each successive week all summer long you would have noticed that the Summer Triangle was a little bit higher in the sky each week and at the end of august was almost directly overhead at 10 p.m. But if you looked to the northeast at 10 p.m. at the end of August you would have also noticed that the autumn constellation Cassiopeia, a group of 5 stars which when connected by lines looks like the letter "m" or "w" on its side, was just rising.

And if you looked just above and east of Cassiopeia you would have also seen 4 dimmer stars which, if you draw lines between them, make up a great rectangle or square and which is called the Autumn Square or the Great Square of Pegasus, because it is part of the huge constellation Pegasus, the winged horse. Then if you went out each successive week in September at 10 p.m. you would have noticed that the Summer Triangle was slowly moving past overhead and beginning its descent toward the western horizon while the autumn Square of Pegasus was ascending higher and higher in the east, so that by the first two weeks of October it is almost overhead at 10 p.m.

And I think it is rather poetic that the 3 blazing hot stars that make up the Summer Triangle are replaced by the much dimmer and softer stars of the Autumn Square because autumn is after all the softest and gentlest season of the year. So some night this week and next go out and see for yourself how the heavens above have their own seasons just as our Earth has below. Look first for the Summer Triangle west of overhead and beginning its descent toward the western horizon, then look for autumn's Cassiopeia, in the northeast, and finally almost overhead, autumn's biggest and gentlest Great Square which the ancient Babylonians believed was the doorway to paradise. And if, indeed autumn is a visual paradise on Earth, how appropriate that this lovely portal to a cosmic paradise heralds in the new season. I'm Jack Horkheimer, keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


 

NEW FOR STAR GAZER!
"Star Gazer" is now available for
Video Podcasting as well as RealPlayer streaming video.

 Click Here  Click Here

Star Gazer Minute

#06-39 M

9/25/2006 thru 10/1/2006

"Autumn's Great Cosmic Square Replaces
Summer's Great Cosmic Triangle"


Horkheimer: Whenever the seasons change on Earth so too do the stars change overhead thus the phrase "the stars of the season", which refers to the stars highest above the horizon in mid evening. Since autumn has just begun we can already see that change. At 10 p.m. look west of overhead and you will see the three blazing hot stars of the Summer Triangle beginning their descent toward the horizon while replacing them almost overhead are the four much dimmer and softer stars which make up the Autumn Square, the Great Square of Pegasus the winged horse. How appropriate because autumn is the softest and gentlest season of the year. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

 

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


[SmilinJack]Return to the [STAR GAZER Main Page]