STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION



STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half hour feed
Monday 8/20/07 1000 to 1030
Includes episodes 0736, 0737, 0738, 0739


Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE

Episode # 07-36 / 1552nd Show
To Be Aired : Monday 9/03/2007 through
Sunday 9/09/2007

"The Morning Star Reaches Its Greatest Brilliancy
And Pairs Up With The Moon This Weekend"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. What a beautiful weekend we're going to have because this Saturday and Sunday will be Moon and Morning Star weekend. Plus this month the Morning Star will reach its greatest brilliancy! Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this Saturday September 8th about 45 minutes before sunrise facing east where you will see an exquisite crescent Moon complete with Earthshine which will look like a dark full Moon nestled within the bright crescent. And down below it to its right a super dazzling light, which people often mistake for a UFO, the sensational so-called Morning Star, which you regular star gazer viewers know is not a star at all but a planet, the closest planet to Earth and the same size as Earth, 8,000 mile wide Venus named for the roman goddess of love and beauty. And beautiful it is and lovely to see. Venus not only masquerades as the Morning Star but also as the Evening Star, changing its place every few months from being seen before sunrise to being seen after sunset. And this appearance of Venus as the Morning Star is just about as good as it gets and teamed up with a crescent Moon this weekend will take your breath away. But if it's clouded out where you live this Saturday then simply go out this Sunday morning the 9th and an even skinnier crescent Moon complete with earthshine will be just down below Venus and to its left.

Plus as a bonus if you've got a really flat clear unobstructed horizon you will see two dimmer lights, the higher one being Regulus the star which marks the heart of Leo the Lion. And right beside it the 6th planet out from the sun Saturn which is always spectacular as seen through even a small inexpensive telescope. But just in case you miss the Moon and Morning Star show this weekend you can still see Venus for a long time because it will be at greatest brilliancy for over a month and each successive morning will be a little bit higher as will Regulus and Saturn. In fact if you look for Venus, Regulus and Saturn about an hour before sunrise every week you can watch Saturn and Regulus as they move closer and closer to Venus until the second week of October they'll be at their closest to each other and will make a magnificent triangle. Wow!

So start your Morning Star, Regulus and Saturn watch now! And please don't miss the Moon and Venus this Saturday and Sunday. But keep in mind that even though these objects appear close together they are in reality very far apart from each other. In fact this weekend it will take light moving at the speed of 186,000 miles per second only 1 1/3 seconds to travel from the Moon to Earth whereas Venus is so much farther away it will take 3 minutes for its light to reach us. Saturn is so much farther away it will take an hour and a half for its light to reach us. But Regulus is so humongously far away, the light we see this weekend started its journey 78 years ago! Have a cosmic weekend and keep looking up!

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Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

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"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#07-36 M

9/03/2007 thru 9/09/2007

"The Morning Star Reaches Its Greatest Brilliancy
And Pairs Up With The Moon This Weekend"

Horkheimer: This Saturday and Sunday celebrate the Moon meets the Morning Star weekend. This Saturday about 45 minutes before sunrise face east and you'll see an exquisite crescent Moon complete with earthshine which will look like a black full Moon nestled within the crescent, just above a super dazzling light often mistaken for a UFO, the so-called Morning Star which is really a planet the same size as our Earth, Venus, named for the Roman goddess of beauty and love. Go out Sunday and an even skinnier crescent will be down just below Venus. And as a bonus close to the horizon you'll see Regulus the star which marks the heart of Leo the Lion and planet #6 ringed Saturn. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

 

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.
This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer






STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION

STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station. You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half hour feed
Monday 8/20/07 1000 to 1030
Includes episodes 0736, 0737, 0738, 0739
Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.




STAR GAZER

Episode #07-37 /1553rd Show
To Be Aired : Monday 9/10/2007 through Sunday 9/16/2007

"An Alert To Drivers On Next Week's Autumnal Equinox"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Next week Sunday September 23rd at 5:51 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time, or your local equivalent, the autumnal equinox will occur. And every year I like to issue an alert to drivers who venture out at Sunrise or Sunset. Why? And just what is the autumnal equinox anyway? Let me show you.

O.K., the word equinox comes from the Latin equi which means equal and nox which means night, equal night. And there are only two days of the year when the hours of night and day are equal, the autumnal equinox, the first day of autumn and the vernal equinox, the first day of spring. You see these are the two days when the Sun on its yearly journey against the background of stars crosses an imaginary line we call the celestial equator. Thus on these two days of the year only will the Sun rise exactly due east and set exactly due west. Every other day of the year it will rise and set at a different point along the horizon. And you can see this for yourself.

In fact, on Sunday the 23rd you can see the Sun rise exactly due east and set due west. But on the next day Monday the 24th it will rise and set one Sun width to the south of where it rose and set on the 23rd. And each successive day it will keep rising a little farther south until the first day of winter, the winter solstice it will rise at its farthest point southeast after which it will slowly retrace its path journeying northward each day until once again it will rise due east on the other equinox, the vernal equinox, the first day of spring. After which it will rise a little bit more northeast each successive day until it reaches its farthest northeast point of rising on the first day of summer, the summer solstice, after which it will head southeast once again until the Sun rises exactly due east on the first day of autumn, the autumnal equinox; which is where the Sun will rise on Sunday the 23rd.

And I issue a driver's alert for this reason. You see if you're driving on a due east highway at sunrise on either the autumnal or vernal equinox the Sun will rise directly over the yellow line in the middle of the road and conversely if you're driving at sunset on a due west highway the Sun will set directly over the yellow line in the middle of the road. So to keep you from being blinded, I alert you to put your sun glasses on and your sun visors down on both equinoxes! And in case the Sun doesn't rise or set over the yellow line in the middle of your east / west highway, it simply means that your highway is not true due east / due west. So put those sun visors down and make sure you do not ever stare directly at the Sun on the equinoxes or any other day. Keep looking up!

How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#07-37 M

9/10/2007 thru 9/16/2007

"An Alert To Drivers On Next Week's Autumnal Equinox"

Horkheimer: Sunday the 23rd is the first day of fall, the autumnal equinox. On that day the Sun will sit smack dab on the celestial equator and the hours of night will be equal to the hours of day. But did you know that on the equinox the Sun rises directly due east and sets directly due west? You can see this yourself because if you're driving on a due east highway at sunrise the Sun will rise directly over the yellow line in the middle of the road. And if you're driving west on a due west highway at sunset the Sun will set directly over the yellow line in the middle of the road. So put your sun glasses on and your sun visors down on the 23rd! Happy equinox and keep looking up!


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)


For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




 


STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half hour feed
Monday 8/20/07 1000 to 1030
Includes episodes 0736, 0737, 0738, 0739

Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 07-38 / 1554th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 9/17/2007 through Sunday 9/23/2007

"The Harvest Moon And Two Fun Things You Can Do With It"

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. Next Wednesday September 26th is the night of the Harvest Moon. But what is a Harvest Moon anyway? According to the dictionary a harvest is simply the act of gathering in a crop or the harvested crop itself. And for centuries at this time of year across North America and Europe the fall harvest took place. So traditionally the full Moon closest to the first day of fall, the autumnal equinox, was called the Harvest Moon. And since the autumnal equinox occurs this Sunday the 23rd this means that the full Moon three nights later on the 26th will be the official night of the Harvest Moon 2007.

Now although traditionally we talk about the one night of the Harvest Moon, in reality the Harvest Moon includes the almost full Moon the night before and the almost full Moon the night after. You see normally the Moon rises approximately 50 minutes later each successive night except for the Harvest Moon which rises only 20 to 25 minutes later each successive night. The astronomical reason for this is that the path of the full Moon closest to the autumnal equinox makes a much smaller angle with the horizon than at any other time of the year. And before the invention of electric lights this was very important to farmers at harvest time because it meant that they could work after sunset for several evenings in a row gathering in their crops by the bright light of the Harvest Moon. Today with mechanized farming and artificial lighting harvesting goes on 24 hours a day so the Harvest Moon has lost its original agricultural significance although one thing it will never lose is its incredible beauty. Because for three nights we will see it rise shortly before or shortly after sunset. And all rising full Moons always look bigger and more colorful than when they are overhead.

The reason the full Moon looks more colorful, as it rises is because we see it through thicker and dustier layers of our Earth's atmosphere than when it's overhead. Plus a full Moon always looks bigger when it's at the horizon than overhead, even though this is just an illusion, one of the grandest illusions of nature. And you can prove it's an illusion yourself next week. All you have to do is take a dime and hold it out at arm's length when the Harvest Moon is close to the horizon and again when it's at its highest. And you will see that your dime covers exactly the same amount of the Moon. And if you want to see another really nifty Moon illusion simply bend over at the waist and look at the rising Harvest Moon upside down between your legs and bingo it will instantly look smaller than when you look at it right side up. But the reason for this illusion is still being discussed and argued by Moonwatchers. So don't miss next week's three nights of the Harvest Moon as it rises big and orangeish like a huge pumpkin over the horizon. It will be absolutely gorgeous and definitely more than a dime's worth of fun. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.

 


 

Star Gazer Minute

#07-38 M

9/17/2007 thru 9/23/2007

"The Harvest Moon And Two Fun Things You Can Do With It"

Horkheimer: Next Wednesday is the night of the Harvest Moon. Just after sunset look east and you'll see the huge pumpkin colored Harvest Moon rising. Now everyone knows when the Moon rises it always looks much bigger than when it's overhead. But this is just an illusion which you can prove to yourself. Simply take a dime, hold it at arm's length when the Moon is rising and again when it's at its highest and you will see that your dime covers exactly the same amount of the Moon. For Moon illusion number 2 bend over at the waist and look at the rising Moon upside down between your legs and bingo it will instantly look smaller than when you look at it right side up. Try it! Happy Harvest Moon and keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer




STAR GAZER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION


STAR GAZER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. There is a five minute and a one minute version available each week. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. Visit http://www.pbs.org/stationfinder/index.html for help in locating your local PBS station.

You may take STAR GAZER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc. without written permission.

Satellite feed info:

GE 3 - PBS Transponder 512 - Digital Only!

Half hour feed
Monday 8/20/07 1000 to 1030
Includes episodes 0736, 0737, 0738, 0739

Star Gazer is also available from NASA CORE. A videotape of the current month is available from NASA CORE for $16.00 plus $6.00 shipping (within the U.S). Please send a VISA, MasterCard, check, money order or an official school purchase order to the address below:

NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators

Lorain County JVS NASA CORE / 15181 Route 58 South / 440/775-1400 / FAX 440/775-1460 / nasaco@leeca.org / http://core.nasa.gov


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR GAZER.
Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR GAZER

Episode # 07-39 / 1555th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 9/24/2007 through Sunday 9/30/2007

"Mars Will Be At Its Closest And Brightest This Christmas!
So Start Your Mars Watch Now!"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers. And as I speak the red planet Mars is zipping towards us at a speed of almost 25,000 miles per hour and will get brighter and brighter every week until on Christmas Eve it will be at opposition and at its closest and brightest. And if you start watching Mars now you can see it dramatically brighten from now until Christmas.

O.K., if we could go way out in space and back in time one year ago to October 1st, 2006 the planet Mars was on the opposite side of the Sun and a whopping 243 million miles away. But since that time as both Mars and Earth have been whizzing around the Sun in their respective orbits, they have been coming closer and closer to each other, from 243 million miles apart on October 1st, 2006 to only 90 million miles apart this October 1st. Which means Mars and Earth are now 153 million miles closer. Plus Mars is now 6 times brighter! But you ain't seen nothing yet. The best is yet to come. Let me show you.

O.K., we've got our skies set up for this week and next about one hour before sunrise facing southeast where you'll see all the bright stars of our old friend Orion the hunter and to his left the constellation Gemini the twins with its two very bright stars. But right between Gemini and Orion and even brighter than any of Gemini or Orion's stars is the tiny 4,000 mile wide red planet Mars which doesn't really look red but looks kind of a brassy yellowish-gold. And even though it's very bright right now by Christmas Eve it will be four times brighter. In fact, even though Mars is only 90 million miles away this week by the third week of December it will be 35 million miles closer only 55 million miles away, and a whopping 23 times brighter than it was a year ago! Wow!

And if you want to see something really nifty next week the Moon will be journeying in the vicinity of Mars. In fact if you go out just before sunrise Tuesday October 2nd you'll see a beautiful almost last quarter Moon hovering just above Mars. And if you go out at the same time the next morning Wednesday October 3rd a slightly smaller moon will have passed it and will be down and to its left. And keep in mind that as week after week goes by Mars will rise earlier and earlier. This week and next it rises in the east around 11 p.m. but isn't really high enough for viewing until around 1 a.m. But by this Christmas Eve when Mars is at opposition it will rise in the northeast just as the Sun sets in the southwest and will be visible all night long. Ladies and gentlemen start your Mars watch engines now. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?


Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Star Gazer Minute

#07-39 M

9/24/2007 thru 9/30/2007

"Mars Will Be At Its Closest And Brightest This Christmas!
So Start Your Mars Watch Now!"

Horkheimer: This Christmas the red planet Mars will be at its closest and brightest and you can watch it get brighter every week. One year ago Mars was a whopping 243 million miles away but next week it will be only 90 million miles away, and at Christmas only 55 million miles away. Plus it will be a whopping 23 times brighter. So one hour before sunrise look southeast and you'll see it shining a bright yellowish-orange gold between the stars of Orion and Gemini. On Tuesday October 2nd the Moon will be just above it and on Wednesday the 3rd just below it. Ladies and gentlemen start your Mars watch engines now. Keep looking up!


How did you like this episode?
Please give us your comments. (Click Here)

For GRAPHICS for this script (Click) Here

"Jack Horkheimer : Star Gazer" is underwritten by a grant from
Noven Pharmaceuticals
Committed to expanding the universe of transdermal drug delivery for the benefit of patients and partners.


Don't miss the cartoon version of
'STAR GAZER' in each monthly issue of




 
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


Starry Night Deluxe was used to produce this episode of Star Gazer


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